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HEALTH
February 5, 2007
Add variety to your exercise routine by incorporating movements that require many different muscles to work at the same time. Here's a fun new move that strengthens your legs, butt, arms, shoulders and abs. You can easily hold a medicine ball instead of a dumbbell. --- 1 Stand with your feet shoulder width apart while grasping the ends of a 5- to 8-pound dumbbell in front of your chest. Squat down, keeping your weight over your heels. Bend your elbows with the dumbbell in front of your chest.
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FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
Cooking and eating more sustainably doesn't require that you rethink your entire life. Here are some simple things you can do to get started. Start canning some of your own pickles and jams when fruits and vegetables are at the peak of season. It will be cheaper than buying store-bought, and likely the quality will be better as well. Grow your own - either plant vegetables in raised beds in the yard or even just put some herbs in pots on a sunny kitchen windowsill. Eat lower on the food chain - take advantage of the whole animal by using off-cuts of meat that others might pass up, such as beef shanks or lamb's necks, and try cooking the less popular small, oily fish, such as mackerel and sardines that don't extract such an environmental cost compared with high-end fish such as salmon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2001
Perhaps, if the planners who created the "point-to-point" system for OCTA were transit dependent, they would have designed it differently. Perhaps, if they had listened to the comments they received, they would not have imposed the system on their customers. Many of us have been seriously inconvenienced by a system designed by those who never intend to use it and, to borrow from Director Sarah Catz, "acted as if they were the only people who knew about the system." It has taken actual ridership figures to legitimize the customer input, namely, that a system that has its only basis in theory, which is soundly contradicted by the underlying geography and is almost unilaterally opposed by those to whom they need to sell it, simply put, would not work.
HEALTH
December 13, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Placing a yoga block under your feet in this simple move is an excellent way to isolate and train your abdominal muscles. It helps you to relax your hip flexors so you can feel a stronger workout just in your abdominals. Lie on your back on a padded surface or mat. Bend your knees, bringing the soles of your feet together. Rest the outer edges of your feet on the top of a yoga block. Allow your knees to fall out to the sides. Place your fingertips behind your head with your elbows pointed out to the sides.
HEALTH
January 5, 2004 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight can be reached at kvoightla@aol.com.
Using exercise tubing with this simple move gives you a portable way to firm and strengthen your upper and middle back along with targeting the smaller muscles in your arms and shoulders. You don't have to go to the gym to do it, and it's a handy exercise to remember when traveling. * 1 Sit on the floor and grasp the handles of the exercise tubing with your palms turned up. Hook the middle of the tubing around the arches of both feet.
HEALTH
May 24, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Strengthen your entire back with this one simple move. The first variation, in which your legs are on the floor, targets the upper and mid-back muscles. The second variation kicks up the intensity by also training your buttocks and legs. Lie face down on a level, padded surface. Straighten your legs behind you with your toes down and your inner ankles facing each other. Place the palms of your hands flat on the floor near your rib cage, elbows bent and tucked in close to your body.
HEALTH
May 17, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
One of the keys to good posture is core balance. With this simple move, you can improve your muscular balance so you'll stand taller, with your weight evenly distributed over both legs. Start on all fours with your hands below your shoulders and your knees directly under your hips. Pull your ribcage and navel in toward the spine as you use your abdominals to "brace" the spine. Slowly shift your weight onto your right leg as you straighten and lift your left leg behind you. Reach out through your left heel, keeping your shoulders, hips and knee facing the floor.
HEALTH
December 13, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Placing a yoga block under your feet in this simple move is an excellent way to isolate and train your abdominal muscles. It helps you to relax your hip flexors so you can feel a stronger workout just in your abdominals. Lie on your back on a padded surface or mat. Bend your knees, bringing the soles of your feet together. Rest the outer edges of your feet on the top of a yoga block. Allow your knees to fall out to the sides. Place your fingertips behind your head with your elbows pointed out to the sides.
HEALTH
September 27, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Overtraining your legs or heavy strength training for your thighs can lead to tight quadriceps and hip flexor muscles. It's important to keep these muscles flexible with a simple move, which you can do at a wall for added stability. When you feel comfortable, move away from the wall and practice holding your balance while practicing this pose. Face a flat wall and stand an arms-length away. Shift your weight over your right leg, bend your left knee and grasp your left hand around the arch of your left foot.
HEALTH
September 21, 2009 | Karen Voight
Update this popular abdominal exercise by performing it on a foam roller. You'll train multiple core muscles at the same time with one simple move. -- Karen Voight 1 Lie face up on a full-length, round foam roller with your head and hips supported on the roller. Place your hands on the floor with your palms down. Start with your knees bent above your hips at a 90-degree angle. Focus on keeping your abdominal muscles pulled in toward your spine. Straighten your right leg out in front of you. Pause for two seconds.
HEALTH
September 27, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Overtraining your legs or heavy strength training for your thighs can lead to tight quadriceps and hip flexor muscles. It's important to keep these muscles flexible with a simple move, which you can do at a wall for added stability. When you feel comfortable, move away from the wall and practice holding your balance while practicing this pose. Face a flat wall and stand an arms-length away. Shift your weight over your right leg, bend your left knee and grasp your left hand around the arch of your left foot.
HEALTH
May 24, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Strengthen your entire back with this one simple move. The first variation, in which your legs are on the floor, targets the upper and mid-back muscles. The second variation kicks up the intensity by also training your buttocks and legs. Lie face down on a level, padded surface. Straighten your legs behind you with your toes down and your inner ankles facing each other. Place the palms of your hands flat on the floor near your rib cage, elbows bent and tucked in close to your body.
HEALTH
May 17, 2010 | Karen Voight, Good Form
One of the keys to good posture is core balance. With this simple move, you can improve your muscular balance so you'll stand taller, with your weight evenly distributed over both legs. Start on all fours with your hands below your shoulders and your knees directly under your hips. Pull your ribcage and navel in toward the spine as you use your abdominals to "brace" the spine. Slowly shift your weight onto your right leg as you straighten and lift your left leg behind you. Reach out through your left heel, keeping your shoulders, hips and knee facing the floor.
HEALTH
November 2, 2009 | Karen Voight
To strengthen the muscles in your upper back and rear delts (those muscles in the back of your shoulders), try this simple move. It's ideal after hours of sitting in front of a computer or driving. Pulling your elbows behind you engages your upper back, which helps relieve tension in your chest, neck and upper trapezius muscles. -- Karen Voight 1Place the center of a resistance band or stretch tubing under your right foot. Grasp the ends of the band in each hand.
HEALTH
September 21, 2009 | Karen Voight
Update this popular abdominal exercise by performing it on a foam roller. You'll train multiple core muscles at the same time with one simple move. -- Karen Voight 1 Lie face up on a full-length, round foam roller with your head and hips supported on the roller. Place your hands on the floor with your palms down. Start with your knees bent above your hips at a 90-degree angle. Focus on keeping your abdominal muscles pulled in toward your spine. Straighten your right leg out in front of you. Pause for two seconds.
HEALTH
March 31, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Back pain is the bane of millions, but some simple exercises may help prevent and alleviate those aches and twinges. These maneuvers don't just target the muscles surrounding the spine -- they hit the abdominal and oblique muscles on the sides of the trunk, as well.
HEALTH
November 2, 2009 | Karen Voight
To strengthen the muscles in your upper back and rear delts (those muscles in the back of your shoulders), try this simple move. It's ideal after hours of sitting in front of a computer or driving. Pulling your elbows behind you engages your upper back, which helps relieve tension in your chest, neck and upper trapezius muscles. -- Karen Voight 1Place the center of a resistance band or stretch tubing under your right foot. Grasp the ends of the band in each hand.
HEALTH
May 12, 2003 | Karen Voight
This exercise will help to strengthen the muscles in your upper and middle back. It can be difficult to train this area of your body from a standing position. The use of a stability ball will provide a better angle and make this move especially effective. 1 Position yourself on a large stability ball so that your upper back and neck are supported by the ball. Walk your feet forward until your ankles are directly below your knees; keep your hips at knee level.
HEALTH
February 5, 2007
Add variety to your exercise routine by incorporating movements that require many different muscles to work at the same time. Here's a fun new move that strengthens your legs, butt, arms, shoulders and abs. You can easily hold a medicine ball instead of a dumbbell. --- 1 Stand with your feet shoulder width apart while grasping the ends of a 5- to 8-pound dumbbell in front of your chest. Squat down, keeping your weight over your heels. Bend your elbows with the dumbbell in front of your chest.
HEALTH
January 5, 2004 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight can be reached at kvoightla@aol.com.
Using exercise tubing with this simple move gives you a portable way to firm and strengthen your upper and middle back along with targeting the smaller muscles in your arms and shoulders. You don't have to go to the gym to do it, and it's a handy exercise to remember when traveling. * 1 Sit on the floor and grasp the handles of the exercise tubing with your palms turned up. Hook the middle of the tubing around the arches of both feet.
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