Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSimple Truth
IN THE NEWS

Simple Truth

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
She enters an empty apartment, sees a note and picks it up. Softly, she begins to sing, her voice hollow as she acknowledges the end of her marriage. Mid-song, her soon-to-be-ex-husband enters the scene. He's in another place and time, however, and when she has finished singing, he lets out a whoop and launches into a giddy song about the girl he's just met.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2008 | Sarah Ruhl, Special to The Times
If SOMEONE were to ask me why I wrote this strange play "Dead Man's Cell Phone," I might be silent, I might be evasive, or I might outright lie. But imagine that I said that I was interested in the culture of cellphones, in how they have completely altered our emotional, psychic and body states to the point where culture (and perhaps not even evolution) has caught up.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1993
I wholeheartedly agree with and applaud the Marotta article on taxation. Its message is exactly what we Republicans have been saying for years. It is best summed up by the last sentence, "Government cannot create real prosperity and real jobs." How come 43% of the electorate in 1992 failed to understand this rather simple truth? ROBERT L. FRANZ Placentia
MAGAZINE
September 16, 2007 | Dan Neil
The come-on is always the same: "10 Super Sexy Secrets to a Hot Date Night," screams the cover blurb. "The Sexy Move He Wants You to Try." Here's one from the cover of September's Glamour: "Your Top 10 Sex Questions, Answered at Last." Finally, a publication has the courage to speak the forbidden truth. Now, thanks to Conde Nast, I can rank my top five touch-me zones.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1986
Bank of America's problems are not all due to bad loans in real estate, agriculture and the Third World. Basic in-house management must be questioned. Let me give one obvious example. The ratio of employees per branch for Bank of America is an incredible 71, while the same ratio for First Interstate Bank is a more reasonable 35, based on data in The Times. It is a simple truth that in any bureaucratic organization, excess employees exist by creating excess work for each other. Bank of America's overstaffing serves neither the needs of the customer nor the stockholder.
MAGAZINE
June 5, 1988
Joshua Hammer called me to dig for dirt: There is no dirt! The article portrayed my ex-husband as "freewheeling" and irreverent toward authority! That's ridiculous! Kevin Anderson is a homebody and a hard worker, a warm, caring, talented man. Kevin takes pride in his work. It's his nature to serve. Kevin was overly devoted to the people he worked for at Magnuson Computers. Contrary to implications, Kevin was the last of the company founders to leave. He paid incredible taxes on worthless stock.
NEWS
August 25, 1991
Good for Steven Gourley for speaking out and saying it like it is--the plain and simple truth! I think Mr. Gourley deserves accolades for addressing this critical problem. I admire his straightforward comments and he has my support. Finally there is someone with integrity who doesn't talk out of both sides of his/her mouth, someone who will address what is even if he receives some flak, someone who will take a stand! Mr. Gourley, read my lips--thank you! JUDY SUMMER WINICK Beverly Hills
OPINION
May 13, 2006
"Draft Hollywood," Andrew Klavan's bellicose article (Current, May 7), cites the need for wisdom yet immediately lurches to find the "simple truth." In his simplicity, Klavan melds together the military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, conveniently ignoring the substantial difference. One (Afghanistan) was a legitimate response to an attack; the other (Iraq) was a fabricated war of choice and aggression. Moreover, in his war fever, he seems to be recklessly gung-ho to attack Iran without regard to cost and consequence.
MAGAZINE
September 16, 2007 | Dan Neil
The come-on is always the same: "10 Super Sexy Secrets to a Hot Date Night," screams the cover blurb. "The Sexy Move He Wants You to Try." Here's one from the cover of September's Glamour: "Your Top 10 Sex Questions, Answered at Last." Finally, a publication has the courage to speak the forbidden truth. Now, thanks to Conde Nast, I can rank my top five touch-me zones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1998 | DANA PARSONS
It's a little after 9 in the morning on Christmas Eve. Samuel Bostwick is up and about, which is more than can be said for some of his fellow homeless comrades, racked out on the sidewalk at the county's Rescue Mission in Santa Ana. If they know Christmas is around the corner, they don't seem to care. So much of Christmas is wrapped around home and family, you wonder how Christmas looks to someone who has neither.
OPINION
May 13, 2006
"Draft Hollywood," Andrew Klavan's bellicose article (Current, May 7), cites the need for wisdom yet immediately lurches to find the "simple truth." In his simplicity, Klavan melds together the military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, conveniently ignoring the substantial difference. One (Afghanistan) was a legitimate response to an attack; the other (Iraq) was a fabricated war of choice and aggression. Moreover, in his war fever, he seems to be recklessly gung-ho to attack Iran without regard to cost and consequence.
MAGAZINE
October 17, 2004 | Bob Welch, Bob Welch is the author of "American Nightingale: The Story of Frances Slanger, Forgotten Heroine of Normandy" (Atria Books, 2004).
Frances Slanger was not remembered amid the hoopla that D-day and the new World War II Memorial triggered last spring, nor during ceremonies for American soldiers dying in Iraq. But Thursday marks the 60-year anniversary of someone whose life and wartime death, a New York radio show host once said, "surpassed anything Hollywood has ever dreamed of."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
She enters an empty apartment, sees a note and picks it up. Softly, she begins to sing, her voice hollow as she acknowledges the end of her marriage. Mid-song, her soon-to-be-ex-husband enters the scene. He's in another place and time, however, and when she has finished singing, he lets out a whoop and launches into a giddy song about the girl he's just met.
MAGAZINE
July 21, 2002 | ERIC PAPE
Look into the face of Virgilio Pablo Paz Romero. Do you see a terrorist? Sitting in Versailles, a sprawling Cuban restaurant in the heart of Miami's Little Havana, the only thing that seems to separate Paz from the middle-aged, Cuban-born fathers eating with their kids is the distinctive cleft in his chin. There is no trace of the hardened gaze of his youth three decades ago. Then he speaks, explaining intensely that he didn't realize how American he had become until Sept. 11.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
The presidency, Al Gore now likes to say, "is the only position in our country that is filled by an individual who is assigned the responsibility of fighting not just for one district or one state, not for one group . . . [but] for all our people." That's a noble sentiment. It's only too bad that Gore, and all of his leading rivals for the presidency, are having so much trouble living up to it in this campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1998 | DANA PARSONS
It's a little after 9 in the morning on Christmas Eve. Samuel Bostwick is up and about, which is more than can be said for some of his fellow homeless comrades, racked out on the sidewalk at the county's Rescue Mission in Santa Ana. If they know Christmas is around the corner, they don't seem to care. So much of Christmas is wrapped around home and family, you wonder how Christmas looks to someone who has neither.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN and JOHN LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Today is gone, today was fun. Tomorrow is another one. Every day, from here to there, Funny things are everywhere. --"One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" Generations of Theodor Geisel's readers revisited Who-ville and the Kingdom of Didd on Wednesday, as the death of a man who became part of childhood set off journeys of nostalgia for anyone who had ever cursed the Grinch who stole Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Even in sunny Los Angeles, it's probably fair to say that everybody loves a snowflake. But beyond the sheer pleasure of catching one on the tip of one's tongue, snowflakes teach lessons about truth and beauty--two of the strangest bedfellows ever to share a bunk in the house of science. What does truth have to do with beauty, and how can snowflakes enlighten their relationship? Snowflakes are beautiful because they embody just the right amount of symmetry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Even in sunny Los Angeles, it's probably fair to say that everybody loves a snowflake. But beyond the sheer pleasure of catching one on the tip of one's tongue, snowflakes teach lessons about truth and beauty--two of the strangest bedfellows ever to share a bunk in the house of science. What does truth have to do with beauty, and how can snowflakes enlighten their relationship? Snowflakes are beautiful because they embody just the right amount of symmetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996 | Christopher Knight, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
In the 1950s and 1960s, when stylistic innovation was perhaps the most valuable artistic currency to be spent in the contemporary art world, John McLaughlin's paintings were utterly bankrupt. Built on the precedent of the Dutch artist Piet Mondrian and the Russian Kasimir Malevich, McLaughlin's stripped-down style added nothing to the established repertoire of flat, uninflected, rectilinear color-shapes painted on easel-size canvases. Stylistically, they were unimaginative.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|