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Simplesse Product

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August 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
FDA Approves New Simplesse: The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new version of Simplesse, meaning the fat substitute can now be used in everything from mayonnaise to pastries, product developer NutraSweet Co. said. The new, non-frozen version of Simplesse is made from a whey protein found in milk, NutraSweet said. The company, a subsidiary of Monsanto Co., said low-fat products made with the substitute will have the same taste and texture as those with high levels of fat.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
FDA Approves New Simplesse: The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new version of Simplesse, meaning the fat substitute can now be used in everything from mayonnaise to pastries, product developer NutraSweet Co. said. The new, non-frozen version of Simplesse is made from a whey protein found in milk, NutraSweet said. The company, a subsidiary of Monsanto Co., said low-fat products made with the substitute will have the same taste and texture as those with high levels of fat.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Staley Manufacturing Corp. introduced a low-calorie ingredient that can replace as much as 100% of the fat in a wide range of foods, including baked goods. Stellar is the first major rival for Simplesse, introduced in February, 1990, by Monsanto Co.'s NutraSweet subsidiary. The patented fat replacement is expected to be used in margarine, salad dressings, sour cream, ice cream, dairy and cheese products, meat products, soups, gravies and sauces.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Staley Manufacturing Corp. introduced a low-calorie ingredient that can replace as much as 100% of the fat in a wide range of foods, including baked goods. Stellar is the first major rival for Simplesse, introduced in February, 1990, by Monsanto Co.'s NutraSweet subsidiary. The patented fat replacement is expected to be used in margarine, salad dressings, sour cream, ice cream, dairy and cheese products, meat products, soups, gravies and sauces.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1991 | C. GAIL GREENWALD, C. GAIL GREENWALD is a director in the food industries section of Arthur D. Little, the international management and technology consulting firm headquartered in Cambridge, Mass.
A year ago, when the Food and Drug Administration announced approval of NutraSweet's cholesterol-free substance, Simplesse, food industry observers labeled the product a "blockbuster," the first in a new generation of highly profitable, low-calorie fat substitutes. In a single day, Monsanto, NutraSweet's parent company, watched its stock jump $4.38. But Simplesse's name and the excitement caused by its introduction belie how difficult and risky the development of new food ingredients can be.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees at Procter & Gamble's headquarters in Cincinnati frequently sample french-fried potatoes, deep-fried in a low-calorie, fake fat that the company calls Olestra. Those who have munched the fries say the taste differs not a bit from that of any greasy potato stick scooped from the deep-fat cooker at the corner fast-food joint. That makes Olestra a food product that a diet-conscious world has been awaiting, these folks claim.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is expected to be a boon for diet-conscious ice cream lovers and people worried about cholesterol, the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved the first low-calorie fat substitute for the U.S. market. Simplesse, a combination of milk and egg-white proteins, was cleared only for use in frozen desserts.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arco Chemical Co. will weigh in with a new nondigestible fat substitute, joining the ranks of companies developing such products to satisfy health-conscious consumers. The company has already patented a formula for EPG--esterified propoxylated glycerol, a chemical compound with properties similar to those of natural fats or oils but that is not absorbed by the body, said Thomas Beck, the Arco Chemical executive in charge of EPG's development.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1991 | C. GAIL GREENWALD, C. GAIL GREENWALD is a director in the food industries section of Arthur D. Little, the international management and technology consulting firm headquartered in Cambridge, Mass.
A year ago, when the Food and Drug Administration announced approval of NutraSweet's cholesterol-free substance, Simplesse, food industry observers labeled the product a "blockbuster," the first in a new generation of highly profitable, low-calorie fat substitutes. In a single day, Monsanto, NutraSweet's parent company, watched its stock jump $4.38. But Simplesse's name and the excitement caused by its introduction belie how difficult and risky the development of new food ingredients can be.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arco Chemical Co. will weigh in with a new nondigestible fat substitute, joining the ranks of companies developing such products to satisfy health-conscious consumers. The company has already patented a formula for EPG--esterified propoxylated glycerol, a chemical compound with properties similar to those of natural fats or oils but that is not absorbed by the body, said Thomas Beck, the Arco Chemical executive in charge of EPG's development.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees at Procter & Gamble's headquarters in Cincinnati frequently sample french-fried potatoes, deep-fried in a low-calorie, fake fat that the company calls Olestra. Those who have munched the fries say the taste differs not a bit from that of any greasy potato stick scooped from the deep-fat cooker at the corner fast-food joint. That makes Olestra a food product that a diet-conscious world has been awaiting, these folks claim.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is expected to be a boon for diet-conscious ice cream lovers and people worried about cholesterol, the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved the first low-calorie fat substitute for the U.S. market. Simplesse, a combination of milk and egg-white proteins, was cleared only for use in frozen desserts.
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