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Simpson Timber Co

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NEWS
September 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
This tiny Northern California coastal town has been sold, though exactly who now owns the town remains a mystery. Seattle-based Simpson Timber Co. announced Monday that it had reached an agreement with the buyer after a sealed-bid auction. Simpson attracted dozens of potential buyers with its asking price of at least $1.75 million for one of the last company towns in the West.
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NEWS
September 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
This tiny Northern California coastal town has been sold, though exactly who now owns the town remains a mystery. Seattle-based Simpson Timber Co. announced Monday that it had reached an agreement with the buyer after a sealed-bid auction. Simpson attracted dozens of potential buyers with its asking price of at least $1.75 million for one of the last company towns in the West.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hard for the Simpson Timber Co. to give the keys to its Klamath River forests to the Yurok Indians, knowing that the tribe has always regarded the property as part of its ancestral homeland. It was even harder for the Yurok to accept them. For as long as the Yurok and Simpson officials can remember, they have lived in uneasy proximity, viewing each other with mutual suspicion.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For years the Simpson Timber Co. has conducted tours of its Sacramento Valley eucalyptus plantation, showing off the 12,000-acre tree farm to schoolchildren, civic groups, University of California forestry faculty and federal environmental experts. So it came as a shock when agents from the U.S.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hard for the Simpson Timber Co. to give the keys to its Klamath River forests to the Yurok Indians, knowing that the tribe has always regarded the property as part of its ancestral homeland. It was even harder for the Yurok to accept them. For as long as the Yurok and Simpson officials can remember, they have lived in uneasy proximity, viewing each other with mutual suspicion.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two wealthy couples who anonymously bought a tiny Northern California coastal town have revealed their identities and described their plans to restore it. Lane DeVries, chief executive of Sun Valley Floral Farms in Arcata, his wife, Kathryn, local builder Dan Johnson and his wife, Kendra, kept their identities quiet until finalizing the deal last week with Seattle-based Simpson Timber Co., the former owner. They plan to preserve the historic character of the community of 300.
NEWS
June 30, 1988
A strike by thousands of workers against northwest timber companies spread to California, but members of one union, threatened with replacement, returned to work in Bend, Ore. Members of the International Woodworkers of America widened their strike against Simpson Timber Co. to plants in Tacoma, Wash., and Arcata and Korbell, Calif., union officials said. The new walkouts, involving 700 workers, brought to 8,000 the number of lumber mill employees refusing to work in five Western states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They started in test tubes. Now, 11 years later, an unusual grove on the UC Irvine campus is a monument to a professor's landmark research in tree cloning. The stately trees are coast redwoods-- Sequoia sempervirens . The professor, now retired and living in Santa Cruz, is Ernest A. Ball, 83. And the notable research was Ball's development of a commercially viable way to reproduce Northern California's redwood trees by test-tube cloning, rather than through seeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They started in test tubes. Now, 11 years later, an unusual grove on the UC Irvine campus is a monument to a professor's landmark research in tree cloning. * The stately trees are coast redwoods-- Sequoia sempervirens . The professor, now retired and living in Santa Cruz, is Ernest A. Ball, 83. And the notable research was Ball's development of a commercially viable way to reproduce Northern California's redwood trees by test-tube cloning, rather than through seeds.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For years the Simpson Timber Co. has conducted tours of its Sacramento Valley eucalyptus plantation, showing off the 12,000-acre tree farm to schoolchildren, civic groups, University of California forestry faculty and federal environmental experts. So it came as a shock when agents from the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1997 | Associated Press
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service expects 18 million acres of fish and wildlife habitat to be protected on private lands by the end of the year under habitat-conservation plans. A look at the 20 largest plans, their location and species affected: 1. State of Washington, 1.6 million acres specified in management plan for state's 2.1 million acres of forestry lands; northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, salmon, steelhead, trout. 2.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six weeks after vetoing a Democrat-sponsored forest protection measure, Gov. Pete Wilson unveiled a new compromise plan Tuesday to restrict logging on private timberland that drew substantial support from most lumber interests.
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