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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Is the Bible a work of fiction or nonfiction? The question spawns genuine confusion. One thing is certain: Calling the Bible a work of fiction is a sure-fire way to rile up believers, particularly as we head into the “war on Christmas” season, when conservative Christians are on the lookout for anything that smacks of religious disrespect. Last week in Simi Valley, a social-media savvy pastor, Caleb Kaltenbach of Discovery Church, was in Costco, looking for a gift for his wife.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
The image of bandit Jesus Malverde turns up as a kind of venerated saint inside " Quitapesares (Solace)," a makeshift chapel by artist Maria Romero erected near the end of a large new exhibition at the UCLA Fowler Museum. On May 3, 1909, the outlaw was hanged from a tree in the town of Culiacán, capital of Sinaloa near the country's northwest coast, by the federal government of Mexican dictator Porfirio Diaz. He was left to rot in the sun. At least, that's what people say. Historians have found no evidence that the story is true.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1987
Now that Jim and Tammy Bakker have discovered and latched onto the "976" telephonic-tape gold mine with an estimated possible daily take of up to $100,000 it may be necessary to revise the Biblical observation that "the wages of sin is $$$$$." NORM HASS Los Angeles
SPORTS
April 17, 2014 | Chris Erskine
Bad TV deals are becoming a ruinous force, the Time Warner Cable deal the latest example, with Dodgers fans held hostage in yet another standoff. Welcome to America, 2014. It used to be copious bundles of advertising cash were once enough to keep TV and ballclubs afloat, now copious amounts of cable cash are required. Stop this train. I want to get off. Why isn't Bud Selig helping solve this fiasco? Where's L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti? We also have a couple of U.S. senators I haven't seen in maybe three years, and they are AWOL too. Feeling used or abandoned, Dodgers fans?
OPINION
December 29, 2013
Re "It's no sin to be rich," Opinion, Dec. 27 Richard Riordan and Eli Broad are notable for their business acumen and philanthropic efforts, but their idea that we should rely on philanthropy to fulfill many societal needs is problematic. They decry "onerous" taxes. Onerous? We are taxed at historically low federal rates, and income inequality continues to widen. When an extraordinarily wealthy candidate for president pays an effective federal income tax rate of about 14%, would a few-percentage-point increase stop him from amassing more wealth?
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By Richard Riordan and Eli Broad
Is it a sin to be rich? Not if your resources are used to help others and create jobs. If you listen to most of the discussions of income inequality, it certainly seems like affluence itself is a crime. We hear increasing calls for higher taxes on the wealthy and other policies designed to redistribute income. President Obama summed up that position when he said, "Our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. " The assumption behind these proposals is that a minority of Americans has become rich by making a majority of our people poorer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Although no one knows if former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping did say "To get rich is glorious," that sentiment has certainly taken hold in China. But what happens to a society when an unregulated drive for personal wealth upends traditional norms? What happens to the less fortunate when people who have money come to believe that nothing else matters? "A Touch of Sin," the powerful if uneven new film by highly regarded Chinese director Jia Zhangke, is a corrosive depiction of the New China, an everything-for-sale society still figuring out how to cope with the dehumanizing effects of unbridled capitalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke's "A Touch of Sin," which debuted at the Cannes Film Festival last week, will be coming to U.S. screens in late fall or early winter. The New York-based company Kino Lorber announced Tuesday that it had picked up the U.S. rights to the movie. The film is Jia's fourth to play at the festival and is divided into four stories. L.A. Times critic Kenneth Turan called the film "a corrosive depiction of the New China, an everything-for-sale society still figuring out how to cope with the dehumanizing effects of unbridled capitalism.
NEWS
May 18, 1986
Re "A Quiet Triumph of Hate" by Al Martinez (Times, May 8): This is the most meaningful, serious and important article that Martinez has ever written . . . a prize winner. I hope the racist hate-mongers get the message. The most disgraceful and frightening thing is that the Police Department, the FBI and the postal inspector refused to become involved. It brings to mind the Holocaust, when the (people of the) whole world closed their eyes, while 6 million men, women and children lost their lives, and proves again that SILENCE is the most unforgivable sin in the world when there is a principle involved.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | Michael Wilmington
If recreational sex these days is a battlefield, then Rebecca DeMornay and Don Johnson, the stars of this 1993 movie, come off as a couple of erotic samurai. She is a hotshot defense attorney and he is her randy client, an accused wife-killer. The two use sexiness as a weapon: thrusting with an innuendo, parrying with a smile. Directed by Sidney Lumet in his coolest, smoothest style, this is an erotic thriller of some accomplishment and some flaws, but it's also funny.
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
LAS VEGAS - Last year, boxing promoter Bob Arum took a Manny Pacquiao fight to China and its rich casinos. Wednesday, he lashed out at the go-to boxing site in Las Vegas, the MGM Grand and its massive Garden Arena, with such vitriol that you might assume Top Rank Promotions and its large stable of name fighters won't be back there. Arum, furious that the bulk of the signage in the MGM Grand was not for his Saturday night headliner between Pacquiao and Timothy Bradley, but for the May 3 battle between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Marco Maidana, was asked if this was it for him and the MGM. “Never say never,” he said.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Jay Jones
TV personality and model Holly Madison recently helped welcome Sprinkles, the Beverly Hills-based cupcake bakery, to Las Vegas. Sporting a new, reddish-brown hair color--she used to be a blonde-- Holly Madison  made the first withdrawal from Sprinkles ' unique ATM. It dispenses cupcakes instead of cash. Madison first tried a cupcake in vanilla, her favorite flavor. She later ordered more items to take home: mini-cupcakes for her daughter, Rainbow, as well as dog-friendly cupcakes for the family pets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Out to prove that the comic-book movie needn't be mega-financed behemoths, the scrappy superhero-noir indie "Sparks" busks its 1940s saga of dark redemption with considerable visual energy, if not always coherence or competence. Starting with wounded, wanted vigilante Ian Sparks (Chase Williamson) barging into a newspaper to report his own murder, the movie flashbacks - and flashbacks - to unravel a convoluted story stemming from a superpower-bestowing meteorite crash, Sparks' teaming with masked crime fighter Heavenly Lady (Ashley Bell)
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Two downtown Las Vegas casinos -- the D Las Vegas Casino Hotel and the Golden Gate Hotel & Casino -- will begin accepting bitcoin on Wednesday. The co-owned properties will welcome the digital currency at their hotel and gift shops but not for gambling, an announcement Tuesday said. The recently upgraded Golden Gate , Vegas' oldest hotel which opened in 1906, and the newish D represent part of the rise of the city's downtown area. Derek Stevens, chief executive of both casinos, acted after being approached by several customers who floated the idea of paying with bitcoin , he said in a statement.
OPINION
December 29, 2013
Re "It's no sin to be rich," Opinion, Dec. 27 Richard Riordan and Eli Broad are notable for their business acumen and philanthropic efforts, but their idea that we should rely on philanthropy to fulfill many societal needs is problematic. They decry "onerous" taxes. Onerous? We are taxed at historically low federal rates, and income inequality continues to widen. When an extraordinarily wealthy candidate for president pays an effective federal income tax rate of about 14%, would a few-percentage-point increase stop him from amassing more wealth?
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By Richard Riordan and Eli Broad
Is it a sin to be rich? Not if your resources are used to help others and create jobs. If you listen to most of the discussions of income inequality, it certainly seems like affluence itself is a crime. We hear increasing calls for higher taxes on the wealthy and other policies designed to redistribute income. President Obama summed up that position when he said, "Our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. " The assumption behind these proposals is that a minority of Americans has become rich by making a majority of our people poorer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
It's no wonder that Luis Buñuel wanted to turn "The Monk" into a movie. Once banned, now merely cherished, the 1796 novel is a lurid amalgam of religious devotion and sin, earthly temptations and supernatural doings. Buñuel never made his movie, but there have been numerous adaptations. The latest, from French director Dominik Moll, is a work whose elegant atmospherics ultimately overwhelm the story, even with the terrific Vincent Cassel in the title role. Moll's version, arriving stateside almost two years after it opened in France, is a decided change of pace for the director of "With a Friend Like Harry" and new territory as well for Cassel.
OPINION
December 7, 2013
Re "A path to upheaval," Dec. 1, and "Into the light," Dec. 2 As a survivor of child sexual abuse by a Roman Catholic priest in Los Angeles, I have mixed feelings about the articles on Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, the retired archbishop of Los Angeles who went to great lengths to prevent priests accused of assault from being turned over to police. On the one hand, I'm grateful that you are revealing Mahony's shameful acts. On the other, I, like other victims, am re-victimized every time these articles appear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Is the Bible a work of fiction or nonfiction? The question spawns genuine confusion. One thing is certain: Calling the Bible a work of fiction is a sure-fire way to rile up believers, particularly as we head into the “war on Christmas” season, when conservative Christians are on the lookout for anything that smacks of religious disrespect. Last week in Simi Valley, a social-media savvy pastor, Caleb Kaltenbach of Discovery Church, was in Costco, looking for a gift for his wife.
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