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BUSINESS
August 27, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Under pressure from the government to squelch the spread of Internet rumors, China's leading microblogging service, Sina Weibo, warned its users Friday to ignore what it termed "false reports. " The move comes four days after Beijing's Communist Party chief visited Sina Corp.'s headquarters and called for Internet companies to stop the spread of information that could threaten the government's control. Sina, which operates more than 200 million Twitter-like microblogs, sent at least two alerts Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Kaiman
BEIJING - If Nicole Zhou reflects how the Chinese feel about Apple Inc.'s latest iPhones, the technology giant may have a huge struggle on its hands winning consumers over in the world's biggest smartphone market. One day after the Cupertino, Calif., company unveiled two new iPhone models - the 5s, with an upgraded processor and fingerprint security system, and the slightly cheaper 5c, with a colorful plastic back - 30-year-old Zhou, an employee at a state-owned enterprise, bought herself a Samsung Galaxy S4 instead.
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WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Spreading rumors on the Internet could get you three years in prison in China, with the penalties rising if the rumor is reposted more than 500 times or viewed by more than 5,000 people. So says a judicial interpretation issued Monday by China's Supreme People's Court and Procuratorate, the first nationwide ruling of its kind. The Chinese Communist Party has waged campaigns against rumors for years, but this is the first time existing laws against defamation and instigating instability have been formally extended to the Internet.
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Spreading rumors on the Internet could get you three years in prison in China, with the penalties rising if the rumor is reposted more than 500 times or viewed by more than 5,000 people. So says a judicial interpretation issued Monday by China's Supreme People's Court and Procuratorate, the first nationwide ruling of its kind. The Chinese Communist Party has waged campaigns against rumors for years, but this is the first time existing laws against defamation and instigating instability have been formally extended to the Internet.
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- On Friday morning, a lone angry man walked up to an elementary school and attacked the most vulnerable people he could find, children ages of 6 to 11. It was almost the same scenario as in Newtown, Conn., except this was in Henan Province, China, and the attacker was armed only with a knife, not a gun. He injured 22 children, but nobody was killed. Comparisons between the Dec. 14 school attacks 7,000 miles apart are inevitable and provoking much comment on both sides of the Pacific.
WORLD
February 5, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - Xi Jinping has a secret admirer and Chinese are yearning to find out who he (or she) is. Since Xi was named Communist Party general secretary in November, a mysterious blogger has been chronicling his every move. There are photographs of Xi on his computer, Xi at a vegetable market, Xi serving meals to the poor, Xi napping on a bus. Not the most scintillating coverage, but it is remarkable in China, where the movements of the leadership are choreographed down to the last handshake and released only to the tightly controlled state media.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - For years, China's net censors turned a blind eye to a major loophole. Anyone who wanted access to blocked overseas websites like Twitter, Facebook, and more recently, the New York Times, only needed to download foreign software called a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent the Great Firewall. But in recent weeks, even these tools have begun to falter, frustrating tech-savvy Chinese and foreign businesspeople who now struggle to access Internet sites as innocuous as gmail.com and imdb.com.
OPINION
September 6, 2011 | By David Wise
A Chinese spy story with a reverse twist surfaced in Beijing last week, providing further evidence that China's rulers are having trouble maintaining their tight control over the Internet. Maj. Gen. Jin Yinan of the People's Liberation Army, in what he apparently thought was an internal briefing, revealed half a dozen cases of Chinese officials who had spied for Britain, the United States and other countries. Somehow, the video of his sensational disclosures leaked out . Clips of his hours-long talk appeared on at least two Chinese websites, Youku.com and Tudou.com, but were quickly removed by government censors.
WORLD
September 29, 2012 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - With the Mid-Autumn Festival fast approaching, Yang Haijuan dropped by the posh China World Hotel to pick up three deluxe sets of mooncakes, gifts for her friends. She'd chosen the eight-cake "Autumn Elegance" boxes, covered in golden fabric and embroidered flowers, at a cost of $63. Each came in a thick, sparkly, gold and red shopping bag with rope-like handles. "I'm buying more this year and spending more than last year," said Yang, a human resources specialist. But she'll get even more boxes of pastries than she'll give: Yang expects to receive up to 20 boxes, from colleagues, friends and family members as gifts for the festival, which is Sunday.
OPINION
April 26, 2012 | By Timothy Garton Ash
BEIJING - What is happening in China? The officially acknowledged or credibly confirmed facts of the Bo Xilai affair are worthy of a blockbuster political thriller. Its deeper causes, however, go to the heart of the weird, unprecedented system of Leninist capitalism that has emerged in China over the last 30 years. Its possible consequences for change in that system could do more to shape the 21st century world than anything happening in Washington, New Delhi or Brussels. Behind the walls of the Communist Party leadership compound, next to the old Forbidden City, the ghost of Hegel has somehow got mixed up with Robert Ludlum.
WORLD
July 22, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - With public sympathy mounting for a disabled man who allegedly set off a homemade explosive at Beijing's international airport, Chinese authorities say they will reexamine his complaints about being inadequately compensated after low-level municipal code enforcers allegedly beat him to the point of paralysis. Ji Zhongxing, 33, has been identified by authorities as the man who detonated a gunpowder-like substance Saturday evening at the arrival hall of the airport's Terminal 3, which handles international flights.
WORLD
May 10, 2013 | By Don Lee
BEIJING - She was a promising student at Beijing's prestigious Tsinghua University, a talented musician who loved to swim and dreamed of studying German and computer science. But in her sophomore year, Zhu Ling began suffering acute stomach pains and hair loss, eventually becoming severely disabled. Lab tests showed she had been poisoned with thallium, a toxic metal used in rat poisons, but police made no arrests and quietly closed the investigation. Today, 19 years after Zhu first fell ill, she remains paralyzed, nearly blind and has the mental capacity of a child.
WORLD
February 5, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - Xi Jinping has a secret admirer and Chinese are yearning to find out who he (or she) is. Since Xi was named Communist Party general secretary in November, a mysterious blogger has been chronicling his every move. There are photographs of Xi on his computer, Xi at a vegetable market, Xi serving meals to the poor, Xi napping on a bus. Not the most scintillating coverage, but it is remarkable in China, where the movements of the leadership are choreographed down to the last handshake and released only to the tightly controlled state media.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - For years, China's net censors turned a blind eye to a major loophole. Anyone who wanted access to blocked overseas websites like Twitter, Facebook, and more recently, the New York Times, only needed to download foreign software called a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent the Great Firewall. But in recent weeks, even these tools have begun to falter, frustrating tech-savvy Chinese and foreign businesspeople who now struggle to access Internet sites as innocuous as gmail.com and imdb.com.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By David Pierson
BEIJING -- For years, China's net nannies turned the other cheek to a loophole in their vast online censorship apparatus. Anyone who wanted access to blocked overseas websites such as Twitter, Facebook, and more recently, the New York Times, need only download foreign software called a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent the Great Firewall. But in recent weeks, even these tools have begun to falter, frustrating tech-savvy Chinese and foreign businesspeople who now struggle to access Internet sites as innocuous as gmail.com and imdb.com.
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- On Friday morning, a lone angry man walked up to an elementary school and attacked the most vulnerable people he could find, children ages of 6 to 11. It was almost the same scenario as in Newtown, Conn., except this was in Henan Province, China, and the attacker was armed only with a knife, not a gun. He injured 22 children, but nobody was killed. Comparisons between the Dec. 14 school attacks 7,000 miles apart are inevitable and provoking much comment on both sides of the Pacific.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2012 | By David Pierson
BEIJING -- China's army of builders can seemingly raise buildings and cities overnight . But deadly rains in the nation's capital have revived questions about how much of their handiwork was well-deployed, let alone made to last. The deluge, which started July 21 and killed 77 people, exposed cracks in Beijing's infrastructure after the city's antiquated drainage network became quickly overwhelmed. Some motorists died trapped inside their vehicles submerged on modern highways.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Kaiman
BEIJING - If Nicole Zhou reflects how the Chinese feel about Apple Inc.'s latest iPhones, the technology giant may have a huge struggle on its hands winning consumers over in the world's biggest smartphone market. One day after the Cupertino, Calif., company unveiled two new iPhone models - the 5s, with an upgraded processor and fingerprint security system, and the slightly cheaper 5c, with a colorful plastic back - 30-year-old Zhou, an employee at a state-owned enterprise, bought herself a Samsung Galaxy S4 instead.
WORLD
September 29, 2012 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - With the Mid-Autumn Festival fast approaching, Yang Haijuan dropped by the posh China World Hotel to pick up three deluxe sets of mooncakes, gifts for her friends. She'd chosen the eight-cake "Autumn Elegance" boxes, covered in golden fabric and embroidered flowers, at a cost of $63. Each came in a thick, sparkly, gold and red shopping bag with rope-like handles. "I'm buying more this year and spending more than last year," said Yang, a human resources specialist. But she'll get even more boxes of pastries than she'll give: Yang expects to receive up to 20 boxes, from colleagues, friends and family members as gifts for the festival, which is Sunday.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In a small office in Hollywood, three USC students scan social media sites to see what's trending. They're looking not at Facebook or Twitter, but at Chinese websites such as Sina Weibo, Youku, Renren and Qzone. The hot topics: soccer star Didier Drogba's move from London's Chelsea club to Shanghai's Shenhua and the latest news on "Iron Man 3," the upcoming U.S.-China co-production starring Robert Downey Jr. "People love Iron Man in China very much," Cecilia Wu, a 20-year-old native of China and student at USC's Marshall School of Business.
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