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BUSINESS
September 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Kaiman
BEIJING - If Nicole Zhou reflects how the Chinese feel about Apple Inc.'s latest iPhones, the technology giant may have a huge struggle on its hands winning consumers over in the world's biggest smartphone market. One day after the Cupertino, Calif., company unveiled two new iPhone models - the 5s, with an upgraded processor and fingerprint security system, and the slightly cheaper 5c, with a colorful plastic back - 30-year-old Zhou, an employee at a state-owned enterprise, bought herself a Samsung Galaxy S4 instead.
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BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By David Pierson
BEIJING -- For years, China's net nannies turned the other cheek to a loophole in their vast online censorship apparatus. Anyone who wanted access to blocked overseas websites such as Twitter, Facebook, and more recently, the New York Times, need only download foreign software called a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent the Great Firewall. But in recent weeks, even these tools have begun to falter, frustrating tech-savvy Chinese and foreign businesspeople who now struggle to access Internet sites as innocuous as gmail.com and imdb.com.
OPINION
September 6, 2011 | By David Wise
A Chinese spy story with a reverse twist surfaced in Beijing last week, providing further evidence that China's rulers are having trouble maintaining their tight control over the Internet. Maj. Gen. Jin Yinan of the People's Liberation Army, in what he apparently thought was an internal briefing, revealed half a dozen cases of Chinese officials who had spied for Britain, the United States and other countries. Somehow, the video of his sensational disclosures leaked out . Clips of his hours-long talk appeared on at least two Chinese websites, Youku.com and Tudou.com, but were quickly removed by government censors.
WORLD
February 23, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
When Guo Sicheng looks at American basketball sensation Jeremy Lin, he can almost see himself. Like Lin, Guo — a 21-year-old college student in Beijing — is athletic, intelligent and ethnically Chinese. He says he hopes that "in the future, Chinese basketball can produce someone like Lin. " But while the California-born Lin's ethnicity has triggered a fan frenzy in China, the 23-year-old New York Knicks point guard's inspirational story presents an awkward challenge for Chinese authorities.
OPINION
February 16, 2012 | By Timothy Garton Ash
Individuals make history. If the last leader of the Soviet Union had not been Mikhail Gorbachev, the world would be a different place. So the character and views ofChina's leader-designate, Xi Jinping, who is visiting the United States, do matter. After spending several years failing to answer the question "Who's Hu?" we must now ask "Who's Xi?" The best thumbnail summary that I have read comes in a forthcoming book by Jonathan Fenby called "Tiger Head, Snake Tails. " (The title refers to modern China, not Xi.)
WORLD
July 22, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - With public sympathy mounting for a disabled man who allegedly set off a homemade explosive at Beijing's international airport, Chinese authorities say they will reexamine his complaints about being inadequately compensated after low-level municipal code enforcers allegedly beat him to the point of paralysis. Ji Zhongxing, 33, has been identified by authorities as the man who detonated a gunpowder-like substance Saturday evening at the arrival hall of the airport's Terminal 3, which handles international flights.
WORLD
May 3, 2012 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A diplomatic crisis over the fate of a Chinese activist took a confusing new turn Thursday as Chen Guangcheng signaled during a dramatic phone call to a congressional commission in Washington that he may want to live permanently in China rather than flee to the United States, as he had declared hours earlier. Speaking from a hospital in China where he was being treated for a leg injury, Chen told the congressional panel through an interpreter that he wanted to come to the U.S. only "to rest.
WORLD
September 29, 2012 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - With the Mid-Autumn Festival fast approaching, Yang Haijuan dropped by the posh China World Hotel to pick up three deluxe sets of mooncakes, gifts for her friends. She'd chosen the eight-cake "Autumn Elegance" boxes, covered in golden fabric and embroidered flowers, at a cost of $63. Each came in a thick, sparkly, gold and red shopping bag with rope-like handles. "I'm buying more this year and spending more than last year," said Yang, a human resources specialist. But she'll get even more boxes of pastries than she'll give: Yang expects to receive up to 20 boxes, from colleagues, friends and family members as gifts for the festival, which is Sunday.
SPORTS
June 20, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
At least seven people were injured in China on Thursday after soccer fans stormed through a gate and a line formed by police and security guards to catch a glimpse of international soccer star David Beckham. Nearly 1,000 fans gathered at the Shanghai Tongji University stadium to see Beckham make an appearance with the school's soccer team in an event that ended up being canceled because of the stampede, the state-run news site Xinmin Net said. Among the injured were three police officers, two university security guards and two students, police said.
TRAVEL
November 2, 2013 | By Jen Leo
This app lets you create your own Instagram-like travel journal. Name: Spottly Available for: iPhone and iPad What it does: Uses your smartphone and desktop photos and your own notes to make personal travel bucket lists. Lazy? You can use photos from the Internet or re-post other people's notes. Cost: Free What's hot: I loved browsing the "Featured" section and found restaurant after restaurant that I wanted to try in foreign destinations whose names I couldn't pronounce, much less read (Asian characters are in play here)
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