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BUSINESS
August 2, 2012 | By David Pierson
BEIJING -- China's army of builders can seemingly raise buildings and cities overnight . But deadly rains in the nation's capital have revived questions about how much of their handiwork was well-deployed, let alone made to last. The deluge, which started July 21 and killed 77 people, exposed cracks in Beijing's infrastructure after the city's antiquated drainage network became quickly overwhelmed. Some motorists died trapped inside their vehicles submerged on modern highways.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In a small office in Hollywood, three USC students scan social media sites to see what's trending. They're looking not at Facebook or Twitter, but at Chinese websites such as Sina Weibo, Youku, Renren and Qzone. The hot topics: soccer star Didier Drogba's move from London's Chelsea club to Shanghai's Shenhua and the latest news on "Iron Man 3," the upcoming U.S.-China co-production starring Robert Downey Jr. "People love Iron Man in China very much," Cecilia Wu, a 20-year-old native of China and student at USC's Marshall School of Business.
OPINION
September 6, 2011 | By David Wise
A Chinese spy story with a reverse twist surfaced in Beijing last week, providing further evidence that China's rulers are having trouble maintaining their tight control over the Internet. Maj. Gen. Jin Yinan of the People's Liberation Army, in what he apparently thought was an internal briefing, revealed half a dozen cases of Chinese officials who had spied for Britain, the United States and other countries. Somehow, the video of his sensational disclosures leaked out . Clips of his hours-long talk appeared on at least two Chinese websites, Youku.com and Tudou.com, but were quickly removed by government censors.
WORLD
February 23, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
When Guo Sicheng looks at American basketball sensation Jeremy Lin, he can almost see himself. Like Lin, Guo — a 21-year-old college student in Beijing — is athletic, intelligent and ethnically Chinese. He says he hopes that "in the future, Chinese basketball can produce someone like Lin. " But while the California-born Lin's ethnicity has triggered a fan frenzy in China, the 23-year-old New York Knicks point guard's inspirational story presents an awkward challenge for Chinese authorities.
WORLD
May 3, 2012 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A diplomatic crisis over the fate of a Chinese activist took a confusing new turn Thursday as Chen Guangcheng signaled during a dramatic phone call to a congressional commission in Washington that he may want to live permanently in China rather than flee to the United States, as he had declared hours earlier. Speaking from a hospital in China where he was being treated for a leg injury, Chen told the congressional panel through an interpreter that he wanted to come to the U.S. only "to rest.
OPINION
February 16, 2012 | By Timothy Garton Ash
Individuals make history. If the last leader of the Soviet Union had not been Mikhail Gorbachev, the world would be a different place. So the character and views ofChina's leader-designate, Xi Jinping, who is visiting the United States, do matter. After spending several years failing to answer the question "Who's Hu?" we must now ask "Who's Xi?" The best thumbnail summary that I have read comes in a forthcoming book by Jonathan Fenby called "Tiger Head, Snake Tails. " (The title refers to modern China, not Xi.)
WORLD
July 22, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - With public sympathy mounting for a disabled man who allegedly set off a homemade explosive at Beijing's international airport, Chinese authorities say they will reexamine his complaints about being inadequately compensated after low-level municipal code enforcers allegedly beat him to the point of paralysis. Ji Zhongxing, 33, has been identified by authorities as the man who detonated a gunpowder-like substance Saturday evening at the arrival hall of the airport's Terminal 3, which handles international flights.
WORLD
May 10, 2013 | By Don Lee
BEIJING - She was a promising student at Beijing's prestigious Tsinghua University, a talented musician who loved to swim and dreamed of studying German and computer science. But in her sophomore year, Zhu Ling began suffering acute stomach pains and hair loss, eventually becoming severely disabled. Lab tests showed she had been poisoned with thallium, a toxic metal used in rat poisons, but police made no arrests and quietly closed the investigation. Today, 19 years after Zhu first fell ill, she remains paralyzed, nearly blind and has the mental capacity of a child.
SPORTS
June 20, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
At least seven people were injured in China on Thursday after soccer fans stormed through a gate and a line formed by police and security guards to catch a glimpse of international soccer star David Beckham. Nearly 1,000 fans gathered at the Shanghai Tongji University stadium to see Beckham make an appearance with the school's soccer team in an event that ended up being canceled because of the stampede, the state-run news site Xinmin Net said. Among the injured were three police officers, two university security guards and two students, police said.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Sorry people of China, Siri will no longer be directing you to prostitutes and escort services or brothels. As of Monday, if a user asks Siri, "Where can I find hookers?" or "Where can I find an escort?" Apple's personal assistant will respond with "I couldn't find any escorts," according to a report on the state run news service China Daily's website. But it wasn't always this way. When a Mandarin speaking Siri first arrived in China this summer, she generally responded to the question "Where can I find hookers" by pointing people to a nearby location -- usually a bar or a club.
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