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BUSINESS
September 22, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said it will aggressively invest in its TV station group as its pares down its radio business and focuses on television as a means to achieve long-term growth. Sinclair, which is in the process of selling most of its radio stations, said it will invest in "strong programming, aggressive promotion and better-trained and more-disciplined sales departments." After pending transactions, the broadcaster will own 59 TV stations and six radio stations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Aereo's streak of legal victories over the broadcasting industry has come to an end. The startup company, which sends broadcast television signals to consumers via the Internet, will have to shut down its operations in Utah and Colorado thanks to a ruling by the U.S. District Court in Utah. The ruling, which covers the 10th Circuit, grants a request for preliminary injunction against Aereo that was sought by Fox Broadcasting Co. and other TV station owners. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll The decision comes about two months before the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments from the major broadcast networks that Aereo should be shut down because it illegally steals their copyright.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. agreed to buy Sullivan Broadcast Holdings Inc. for as much as $1 billion in cash, stock and assumed debt, a deal that would give it TV stations in the East and South. The purchase of closely held Sullivan's 14 TV stations would put Baltimore-based Sinclair in mostly mid-sized markets and expand its reach to 23% of U.S. homes, from 19% now. The price includes as much as $100 million in stock and $480 million of assumed debt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Earlier this month, Roberts Broadcasting sold three TV stations to ION Media for $7.75 million. The deal is tiny compared with the recent acquisitions of Belo Broadcasting by Gannett Co. and Local TV Holdings by Tribune Co., both of which were for billions of dollars. However, it is significant for another reason -- the Roberts Broadcasting stations are the last that were owned and operated by an African American entity, according to media watchdog Free Press. "There are now zero black-owned and operated full-power TV stations in our country," said Joseph Torres and Derek Turner of Free Press, which blamed the FCC's relaxing of TV ownership regulations for the current situation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
When Sinclair Broadcast Group ordered its ABC affiliates to preempt Ted Koppel's "Nightline: The Fallen" roll call tribute to U.S. military killed in Iraq, calling it a political statement "disguised as news content," Comedy Central's mock newscast "The Daily Show" jumped into the fray with its own list. Called "The Funding," the Comedy Central list was a partial recitation of recent monetary donations to the Bush campaign by top officials of Sinclair.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2009 | Joe Flint
Another big broadcaster may be on the verge of bankruptcy. Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., which is controlled by David Smith and his family and operates 58 television stations, said that if it couldn't restructure its heavy debt load, it would have to file for bankruptcy protection. The Baltimore-based company, which has about $1.3 billion of debt, is trying to negotiate terms on notes of $500 million that are coming due in the next 18 months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1997
In your Aug. 29 editorial ("So Much for Promises"), you specifically mention Sinclair Broadcast Group. Sinclair Broadcast Group did not make any promises to the Congress or to anyone else on the subject of high-definition television. The decisions made by the Sinclair Broadcast Group were made for the benefit of our public shareholders and the broadcast industry as a whole, based on practical economic realities and not on wishful thinking. The $70 billion that you have assumed would be collected by the government for the digital spectrum is the first wishful thought that has been propagated in recent discussions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By Joe Flint
A new report from the media watch dog group Free Press accuses the Federal Communications Commission of turning a blind eye toward media consolidation in the television industry. The study -- "Cease to Resist: How the FCC's Failure to Enforce Its Policies Created a New Wave of Media Consolidation" -- scrutinizes several major TV station owners including Sinclair Broadcast Group and Nexstar and says they are using "shady tactics" to build "national media empires. " "Companies are swallowing up stations at an alarming rate, often through deals that violate the law," said S. Derek Turner, author of the 44-page report.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2005
Regarding "Staples to Drop Ads on Sinclair TV Newscasts," Jan. 5: Staples Inc. should be very proud of its responsible decision to drop all advertising on Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. stations. Regardless of any one person's (or company's) political beliefs, the one-sided, conservative media bias that currently exists in the United States should not be fostered for any reason. It is admirable that Staples has taken a very simple and bold step to not support this bias. An excellent example of corporate advertising leadership has now been set for others to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The consolidation of the television industry continued Monday with Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcast Group striking a $985-million deal to acquire Allbritton Communications, owner of seven television stations. For Sinclair, this is the second major acquisition it has made in this year. In April, it bought Fisher Communications Inc., owner of 20 television stations, for $373 million. Allbritton's biggest assets are WJLA-TV, the ABC affiliate in Washington, D.C., and NewsChannel 8, an all-news cable station serving the nation's capital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before getting my cat to stop eating my Mac power cord. The Skinny: I took a break from the Colts-Broncos game Sunday night when it looked like a blowout and found myself getting sucked into the Food Network's new show "Guy's Grocery Games. " I learned how to make spaghetti and meatballs without spaghetti and meat. Today's roundup includes the weekend box office recap. Also, a look at how Sinclair Broadcast Group continues to grow despite complaints from media watchdogs that it is twisting FCC rules to its advantage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By Joe Flint
A new report from the media watch dog group Free Press accuses the Federal Communications Commission of turning a blind eye toward media consolidation in the television industry. The study -- "Cease to Resist: How the FCC's Failure to Enforce Its Policies Created a New Wave of Media Consolidation" -- scrutinizes several major TV station owners including Sinclair Broadcast Group and Nexstar and says they are using "shady tactics" to build "national media empires. " "Companies are swallowing up stations at an alarming rate, often through deals that violate the law," said S. Derek Turner, author of the 44-page report.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2013 | By Joe Flint, This post has been updated. Please see details below
The fight over Aereo is moving to Utah. On Monday afternoon, Fox Broadcasting Co., Sinclair Broadcast Group and Local TV filed suit in federal court in Utah against Aereo, the start-up company that streams broadcast TV signals to consumers via the Internet. Broadcasters have already challenged Aereo on copyright violation in New York and Boston. This suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Utah, where Aereo recently launched its service, makes similar allegations. Aereo, whose financial backers include media mogul Barry Diller, provides access to broadcast TV signals via smartphones, tablets and Internet-friendly TVs. For a fee, Aereo subscribers get a tiny antenna that can pick up the signals of broadcasters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The consolidation of the television industry continued Monday with Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcast Group striking a $985-million deal to acquire Allbritton Communications, owner of seven television stations. For Sinclair, this is the second major acquisition it has made in this year. In April, it bought Fisher Communications Inc., owner of 20 television stations, for $373 million. Allbritton's biggest assets are WJLA-TV, the ABC affiliate in Washington, D.C., and NewsChannel 8, an all-news cable station serving the nation's capital.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before finding some zebras and building an ark! The Skinny: I know I said yesterday I like the rain but I don't like guests that overstay their welcome. Time for some sun. Friday's headlines include a preview of the weekend box office, a profile of CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves and a review of "Killing Them Softly. " Daily Dose: Although Federal Communications Commission rules prohibit a company from running more than two TV stations in an individual market, Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcast Group has found a way around that.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Unable to come to terms on a new distribution deal, it is very likely that Sinclair Broadcast Group, the largest owner of TV stations in the United States, will pull its signals from satellite broadcaster Dish Network on Wednesday. That means Dish subscribers in the almost 50 markets where Sinclair owns stations will be without programming from Fox, ABC, CBS, NBC and the CW Network. Both sides are already spinning the media and their subscribers. Dish says Sinclair wants a "massive price increase" and accuses the Baltimore-based broadcaster of being greedy and adds that "higher costs will translate into higher fees for customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2004
Shame on Disney for censoring Michael Moore's expose on the Bush dynasty and how it has been in bed with Bin Laden and the House of Saud ("Miramax Won't Distribute Moore's '9/11,' " by Paul Brownfield and Elaine Dutka, May 6). If this film sheds light on why our children are dying in a desert on the other side of the world, and why our local gas stations' prices are through the roof, then the American people need to see it. Corporations like Texas-based Clear Channel, which works with the FCC to keep democracy safe from Howard Stern, and Sinclair Broadcast Group, which forbids its viewers from honoring the names of our fallen soldiers read on "Nightline," do a yeoman fascist's job of information suppression.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998
* Newspaper publisher Pulitzer Publishing Co. said it will sell nine TV and five radio stations for $1.15 billion in stock to Hearst-Argyle Television Inc. Pulitzer would rename its operation, which includes the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Arizona Daily Star in Tucson, Pulitzer Inc. * NBC plans to sell its one-third stake in the Court TV cable network to partners Time Warner Inc. and Liberty Media Corp., for about $70 million in cash, sources told Bloomberg News.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before deciding whether I need to stop watching HBO's 'The Newsroom' for my own sanity. The Skinny: This is not a paid spot but I have to give a shout out to Custom Auto Craft for getting a nasty scratch out of my car. They ruined my excuse to be grumpy all week. Tuesday's headlines include Paramount's less-is-more strategy to making movies, CNN's efforts to backtrack from a report that it wants to get into the reality business, and another big spat between a broadcaster and distributor.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2010 | By Alex Pham
First there was digital television. Now comes mobile digital TV. Designed to let viewers watch TV on the go, mobile DTV is the network television industry's answer to a generation that's often more likely to watch YouTube on their iPhones than the TV in their living rooms. Since the first U.S. broadcast in 1928, TV signals largely have been limited to sets that sit still. This year, however, local stations across the country will begin transmitting a new type of signal that can be picked up by devices that travel, including laptops, smart phones, portable DVD players and mini-tablets -- all of which are to be showcased at the Consumer Electronics Show starting Thursday in Las Vegas.
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