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Sinclair Lewis

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NEWS
November 21, 1993
In "Around The Town" on Nov. 11 ("Where Everybody Knows It All--And Your Name Too") Beverly Beyette writes that American author Sinclair Lewis refused the Nobel Prize for literature. It was the Pulitzer Prize in 1926 he refused (for "Arrowsmith"). In 1930, he received the Nobel Prize, the first American writer to receive the honor. Nobel Prize winners in literature who declined the honor were Jean Paul Sartre in 1964 and Boris Pasternak in 1958. JOHN S. JENSEN Downey Editor's note: The Soviet government forced Pasternak to decline the Nobel Prize.
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BOOKS
June 18, 2006 | Richard Rayner, Richard Rayner is the author of several books, most recently "The Devil's Wind," a novel.
UPTON SINCLAIR lived a life of almost cartoonish excitements. He was born in Baltimore in 1878, the frail son of parents whose wealth was fading. In 1888, the family headed to New York and, as Anthony Arthur relates in his fine new biography, "Radical Innocent," the Sinclairs lived hand to mouth, "sliding steadily downwards through a series of boarding houses that catered to displaced southerners like themselves."
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BOOKS
March 31, 2002 | KEITH TAYLOR, Keith Taylor is the author of five chapbooks of poetry and one collection of short stories.
Literary history is usually not kind, but occasionally it is not even just. Sinclair Lewis is a case in point. Even though we think of the 1920s as the decade that saw the ascendancy of the great modernists--of Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Faulkner--Sinclair Lewis, a prolific Midwesterner from Sauk Centre, Minn., was the American writer who dominated the decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2005
I enjoyed Mimi Avins' article on retirement ["For Men, Aging's a Type-A War Zone," Oct. 30]. Let me offer another option, with which I've had great success. I've gone back to graduate school -- the University of Bob -- to get my degree in Mature Wisdom, which is the wisdom that comes when the pressures and influences of youth no longer afflict and warp you. I've created a variety of intriguing courses using the myriad books I've collected over the years but didn't have the time to read, digest and reflect upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1988
Joseph Bissin's letter (April 19) includes a too-common error of confusing Upton Sinclair and Sinclair Lewis--both notable American authors. Upton Sinclair, not Sinclair Lewis, wrote "The Jungle." They were good friends, and I believe both would want the mistake corrected. HUBERT MOREHEAD Rancho Palos Verdes
BOOKS
August 9, 1992
In his article on Pearl Buck (July 12), James C. Thomson Jr. implies a sexist slant from the "cultural establishment" on the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Buck in 1938: "How could this upstart China missionary wife have won something overdue to Theodore Dreiser and other acclaimed male authors?" Because just eight years before they had awarded the Nobel Prize to another American male novelist, Sinclair Lewis (the next American to win the award would be William Faulkner in 1949)
NEWS
May 30, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
Sauk Centre, Minn., is ready to let bygones be bygones. Leaders of the town whose "incredible dullness" bored Sinclair Lewis into writing "Main Street" say they are ready to capitalize on Lewis' fame and develop historic and other attractions. Some people in the town of 3,700, about 95 miles northwest of Minneapolis, think it's about time. Al Tingley, owner of the Palmer House Hotel, said he has tried repeatedly to "get this town to wake up and realize Sinclair Lewis gives them the greatest cottage industry in the world."
BOOKS
February 15, 1987
I wish to express my gratitude to a great Chinese author who died in Shanghai 50 years ago last October. Just as every American will recognize the names of Hemingway or Faulkner, so everyone familiar with 20th-Century Chinese culture will recognize the name of Lu Hsun (Lu Xun). In so much of his writing, there are those sparks of enlightenment that will delight any thinking mind, sometimes with laughter and sometimes with the shock of reality. When George Bernard Shaw visited China, Lu Hsun was one of those who met him. I do not wish to wrongly suggest that these two writers were alike in temperament or style, but they did share that spirit of wonder and a rich wit that keeps their writing alive to this day. While both could be called leftists, they each were such strong individualists that neither could be "party" men. Just as in a famous work, Sinclair Lewis gave our language the word "Babbitt," describing a type of character met with in our society, so Lu Hsun gave to the Chinese language the name "Ah Q" as a character type he described in his famous short story.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2005
I enjoyed Mimi Avins' article on retirement ["For Men, Aging's a Type-A War Zone," Oct. 30]. Let me offer another option, with which I've had great success. I've gone back to graduate school -- the University of Bob -- to get my degree in Mature Wisdom, which is the wisdom that comes when the pressures and influences of youth no longer afflict and warp you. I've created a variety of intriguing courses using the myriad books I've collected over the years but didn't have the time to read, digest and reflect upon.
BOOKS
March 31, 2002 | KEITH TAYLOR, Keith Taylor is the author of five chapbooks of poetry and one collection of short stories.
Literary history is usually not kind, but occasionally it is not even just. Sinclair Lewis is a case in point. Even though we think of the 1920s as the decade that saw the ascendancy of the great modernists--of Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Faulkner--Sinclair Lewis, a prolific Midwesterner from Sauk Centre, Minn., was the American writer who dominated the decade.
NEWS
November 21, 1993
In "Around The Town" on Nov. 11 ("Where Everybody Knows It All--And Your Name Too") Beverly Beyette writes that American author Sinclair Lewis refused the Nobel Prize for literature. It was the Pulitzer Prize in 1926 he refused (for "Arrowsmith"). In 1930, he received the Nobel Prize, the first American writer to receive the honor. Nobel Prize winners in literature who declined the honor were Jean Paul Sartre in 1964 and Boris Pasternak in 1958. JOHN S. JENSEN Downey Editor's note: The Soviet government forced Pasternak to decline the Nobel Prize.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | RHONDA HILLBERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This small prairie town has always felt ambivalent about being home to the quintessential Main Street. After all, Sauk Centre is the model for the town that native son Sinclair Lewis so unflatteringly wrote about in "Main Street." To Carol Kennicott, the novel's young bride, Gopher Prairie "was unprotected and unprotecting; there was no dignity in it nor any hope of greatness." In his 1920 novel, Lewis unleashed a blistering attack on small town ignorance, pettiness and small-mindedness.
BOOKS
August 9, 1992
In his article on Pearl Buck (July 12), James C. Thomson Jr. implies a sexist slant from the "cultural establishment" on the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Buck in 1938: "How could this upstart China missionary wife have won something overdue to Theodore Dreiser and other acclaimed male authors?" Because just eight years before they had awarded the Nobel Prize to another American male novelist, Sinclair Lewis (the next American to win the award would be William Faulkner in 1949)
NEWS
May 30, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
Sauk Centre, Minn., is ready to let bygones be bygones. Leaders of the town whose "incredible dullness" bored Sinclair Lewis into writing "Main Street" say they are ready to capitalize on Lewis' fame and develop historic and other attractions. Some people in the town of 3,700, about 95 miles northwest of Minneapolis, think it's about time. Al Tingley, owner of the Palmer House Hotel, said he has tried repeatedly to "get this town to wake up and realize Sinclair Lewis gives them the greatest cottage industry in the world."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Who would have thought that one of the highlights of the theater year would be a radio show? But there it is, on KCRW (89.9 FM) all day today: the L.A. Classic Theatre Works' production of "Babbitt." We had a stage version of Sinclair Lewis' novel at the Mark Taper Forum earlier this season. But the radio production is the whole book, 14 1/2 hours of it, read by an all-star cast headed by the wonderful Ed Asner as George F. ("Homes for Folks") Babbitt.
BOOKS
June 18, 2006 | Richard Rayner, Richard Rayner is the author of several books, most recently "The Devil's Wind," a novel.
UPTON SINCLAIR lived a life of almost cartoonish excitements. He was born in Baltimore in 1878, the frail son of parents whose wealth was fading. In 1888, the family headed to New York and, as Anthony Arthur relates in his fine new biography, "Radical Innocent," the Sinclairs lived hand to mouth, "sliding steadily downwards through a series of boarding houses that catered to displaced southerners like themselves."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1988
Joseph Bissin's letter (April 19) includes a too-common error of confusing Upton Sinclair and Sinclair Lewis--both notable American authors. Upton Sinclair, not Sinclair Lewis, wrote "The Jungle." They were good friends, and I believe both would want the mistake corrected. HUBERT MOREHEAD Rancho Palos Verdes
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Who would have thought that one of the highlights of the theater year would be a radio show? But there it is, on KCRW (89.9 FM) all day today: the L.A. Classic Theatre Works' production of "Babbitt." We had a stage version of Sinclair Lewis' novel at the Mark Taper Forum earlier this season. But the radio production is the whole book, 14 1/2 hours of it, read by an all-star cast headed by the wonderful Ed Asner as George F. ("Homes for Folks") Babbitt.
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