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Sinead O Connor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
God bless Sinead O'Connor, the prickly Irish rock singer who once ripped a photograph of the pope on live TV to protest the Catholic Church's child sex abuse scandal, for trying to school Miley Cyrus on the pitfalls of female sexual exploitation in the music business. It's not going to work. You simply can't tell a 20-year-old music phenomenon to stop doing the very thing that has brought her even more fame and fortune than she already earned as a tween TV star.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The unlikely beef between Miley Cyrus and Sinead O'Connor has reached its natural 21st century conclusion: a mash-up has united the pair in musical matrimony. The two singers caused some hubbub on the Internet last week after O'Connor wrote an open letter to the former Hannah Montana suggesting she rein it in a bit. Cyrus seemed uninterested in the advice, to say the least; she replied by tweeting some mean jabs at O'Connor and her recent struggles with depression. Needless to say, the artistic beef prompted much blogging and tweeting, as fans of the two artists quickly and vociferously defended their heroes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
We should apologize for yet another Miley Cyrus headline this week, but a beef between musicians will always be incredibly too irresistible to ignore. For the dozen or so of our readers who have miraculously avoided the latest in all things Cyrus-related, the provocative former teen queen has been in a digital war of sorts with Irish singer-songwriter Sinéad O'Connor. Quick recap: Cyrus told Rolling Stone her “Wrecking Ball” video was inspired by O'Connor, O'Connor wasn't flattered and issued an open letter advising Cyrus to stop “pimping” herself and rely on her talent.  PHOTOS: Miley Cyrus before and after Disney Cyrus didn't care for O'Connor's harsh, but arguably sage advice and she's responded by throwing a heavy dosage of shade on Twitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
We should apologize for yet another Miley Cyrus headline this week, but a beef between musicians will always be incredibly too irresistible to ignore. For the dozen or so of our readers who have miraculously avoided the latest in all things Cyrus-related, the provocative former teen queen has been in a digital war of sorts with Irish singer-songwriter Sinéad O'Connor. Quick recap: Cyrus told Rolling Stone her “Wrecking Ball” video was inspired by O'Connor, O'Connor wasn't flattered and issued an open letter advising Cyrus to stop “pimping” herself and rely on her talent.  PHOTOS: Miley Cyrus before and after Disney Cyrus didn't care for O'Connor's harsh, but arguably sage advice and she's responded by throwing a heavy dosage of shade on Twitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Attention all polarizing twentysomething pop stars: When you name-drop your inspirations, don't always expect them to respond with a thank you. Irish singer-songwriter Sinéad O'Connor, who is no stranger to controversy herself, wasn't quite on board with Miley Cyrus name-dropping her in a recent interview. During an interview for her recent Rolling Stone cover story, Cyrus said she drew inspiration from O'Connor's iconic video for “Nothing Compares 2 U” for her latest single “Wrecking Ball.” Now the two clips bare a few similarities.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Surely if Sinead O'Connor wanted to write a letter to Miley Cyrus, she could have done that. She's got the connections to obtain Cyrus' address. There has been justifiable admiration for O'Connor's letter, despite its less than pristine language, admonishing Cyrus that she is allowing others to diminish her talent by hiding it under raunchy antics. In the short term, for all the anguish about Cyrus' awkward attempt at twerking, her move was a smart one. Far from being dismayed by the huge pile of criticism, she almost certainly wanted it. The point wasn't to be admired; it was to get huge piles of publicity, and this was the easiest way to get it. She might someday reach the point where she thinks more about her legacy than the number of headlines, when she cares what the headlines say, not just that they exist aplenty.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012 | By John Payne, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Sinead O'Connor of yore may have scoffed at the passive title of her new album, "How About I Be Me (And You Be You)?" After all, the stormy Irish singer did anything but go with the flow during her reign in the early 1990s. She shaved her head to defy old-school rules about women, incurred the wrath of Madonna by tearing up a photo of the pope on "Saturday Night Live" and refused to perform at a New Jersey venue if the American national anthem was played. Along the way she won a Grammy in 1991 but boycotted the awards show, proclaimed herself a lesbian (then decided she wasn't)
WORLD
March 24, 2010 | By Henry Chu
She shot to fame 20 years ago with her shaved head, chiseled cheeks and haunting rendition of the song "Nothing Compares 2 U." Then she gained notoriety when she tore up a photo of Pope John Paul II on American TV, calling him "the enemy" and urging people to fight child abuse. Sinead O'Connor is still singing. And she's still speaking out against abuse -- only now her 1992 stunt on "Saturday Night Live" almost seems prescient as the Roman Catholic Church faces a growing catalog of complaints about child sexual and physical assault by priests in her Irish homeland and across Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991
This beautiful young lady is apparently too astute to allow her soul to be sold for a heap of passing glory. I am grateful to her, someone from another shore, for waking us to our culture's illusions about "stardom." EDWIN P. SCANLAN Ojai
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Surely if Sinead O'Connor wanted to write a letter to Miley Cyrus, she could have done that. She's got the connections to obtain Cyrus' address. There has been justifiable admiration for O'Connor's letter, despite its less than pristine language, admonishing Cyrus that she is allowing others to diminish her talent by hiding it under raunchy antics. In the short term, for all the anguish about Cyrus' awkward attempt at twerking, her move was a smart one. Far from being dismayed by the huge pile of criticism, she almost certainly wanted it. The point wasn't to be admired; it was to get huge piles of publicity, and this was the easiest way to get it. She might someday reach the point where she thinks more about her legacy than the number of headlines, when she cares what the headlines say, not just that they exist aplenty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
God bless Sinead O'Connor, the prickly Irish rock singer who once ripped a photograph of the pope on live TV to protest the Catholic Church's child sex abuse scandal, for trying to school Miley Cyrus on the pitfalls of female sexual exploitation in the music business. It's not going to work. You simply can't tell a 20-year-old music phenomenon to stop doing the very thing that has brought her even more fame and fortune than she already earned as a tween TV star.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Attention all polarizing twentysomething pop stars: When you name-drop your inspirations, don't always expect them to respond with a thank you. Irish singer-songwriter Sinéad O'Connor, who is no stranger to controversy herself, wasn't quite on board with Miley Cyrus name-dropping her in a recent interview. During an interview for her recent Rolling Stone cover story, Cyrus said she drew inspiration from O'Connor's iconic video for “Nothing Compares 2 U” for her latest single “Wrecking Ball.” Now the two clips bare a few similarities.
NEWS
February 25, 2012
Sinead O'Connor: In the Feb. 21 Calendar section, an article about Sinead O'Connor quoted the singer as saying that the songs on her new album, "How About I Be Me (And You Be You)," are "pretty much" about the man who is the father of her youngest child. The article identified that man as John Reynolds. Reynolds is the father of her oldest child. The man to whom O'Connor was referring is Frank Bonadio. "CQ/CX": In the Feb. 24 Calendar section, the caption for a photo accompanying an article about the play "CQ/CX," which is based on a reporting scandal at the New York Times, identified the actor on the left as Dave Rosen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012 | By John Payne, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Sinead O'Connor of yore may have scoffed at the passive title of her new album, "How About I Be Me (And You Be You)?" After all, the stormy Irish singer did anything but go with the flow during her reign in the early 1990s. She shaved her head to defy old-school rules about women, incurred the wrath of Madonna by tearing up a photo of the pope on "Saturday Night Live" and refused to perform at a New Jersey venue if the American national anthem was played. Along the way she won a Grammy in 1991 but boycotted the awards show, proclaimed herself a lesbian (then decided she wasn't)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2011
A roundup of entertainment headlines for Tuesday. Van Halen is planning a new tour. And in case you're worried, yes, David Lee Roth is back with the group. ( Los Angeles Times ) Tom Cruise still has it: "Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol" was the big movie over the Christmas weekend. ( Los Angeles Times ) Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver spent Christmas together with their kids. Whaaaaa? ( CNN ) A fake People magazine cover touting Taylor Lautner's coming out of the closet fooled a lot of people, including Russell Simmons.
WORLD
March 24, 2010 | By Henry Chu
She shot to fame 20 years ago with her shaved head, chiseled cheeks and haunting rendition of the song "Nothing Compares 2 U." Then she gained notoriety when she tore up a photo of Pope John Paul II on American TV, calling him "the enemy" and urging people to fight child abuse. Sinead O'Connor is still singing. And she's still speaking out against abuse -- only now her 1992 stunt on "Saturday Night Live" almost seems prescient as the Roman Catholic Church faces a growing catalog of complaints about child sexual and physical assault by priests in her Irish homeland and across Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2007 | Ann Powers, Times Staff Writer
EVERY serious music buff has a secret love. The unmanageable kind, as expressed in Doris Day's hit of that name: a passion that lives in the heart of you and grows impatient to be free but awaits those moments when the whole unfurling won't be too darn embarrassing. Maybe you're a metalhead who listens to Diana Krall in your bedroom late at night, or the only person in your group who's still really into the Black Crowes.
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