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BUSINESS
July 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Wins Singapore Contract: The Calabasas-based defense firm said it will sell 18 F-16 jet fighters to the government in a deal worth up to $1 billion. The sale will boost Lockheed's F-16 production backlog at its Ft. Worth plant to more than 550 planes, a spokesman said. Its plane was chosen over McDonnell Douglas' F-18.
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WORLD
May 31, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
SINGAPORE - Chuck Hagel emerged from combat in the Vietnam War with two Purple Hearts and "a sense of how important it would be for America to engage wisely in Asia," as he put it to top defense officials gathered here. Now, more than a year after President Obama pledged to refocus America's security strategy toward Asia, Hagel is using his first visit to the region as Defense chief to reassure allies that the so-called pivot won't be derailed by Pentagon budget cuts or competing demands from the civil war in Syria, the nuclear stalemate with Iran and other high-priority issues.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singapore Wants to Purchase Lockheed F-16s: The U.S. Defense Department said Singapore wants to buy up to 18 of the fighter jets for $890 million. The sale--which would also include spare engines, air-to-air missiles and personnel training--will become official by year's end if Congress does not object. Lockheed, based in Calabasas, builds the F-16 in Ft. Worth, Tex. The company currently has an F-16 backlog of about 700 aircraft.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Wins Singapore Contract: The Calabasas-based defense firm said it will sell 18 F-16 jet fighters to the government in a deal worth up to $1 billion. The sale will boost Lockheed's F-16 production backlog at its Ft. Worth plant to more than 550 planes, a spokesman said. Its plane was chosen over McDonnell Douglas' F-18.
WORLD
May 31, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
SINGAPORE - Chuck Hagel emerged from combat in the Vietnam War with two Purple Hearts and "a sense of how important it would be for America to engage wisely in Asia," as he put it to top defense officials gathered here. Now, more than a year after President Obama pledged to refocus America's security strategy toward Asia, Hagel is using his first visit to the region as Defense chief to reassure allies that the so-called pivot won't be derailed by Pentagon budget cuts or competing demands from the civil war in Syria, the nuclear stalemate with Iran and other high-priority issues.
NEWS
October 9, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like so many Americans, Steve Hill was appalled when he saw newspaper reprints of two World Trade Center terrorists as they passed through airport security the morning of Sept. 11. The sight of Mohamed Atta and Waleed M. Alshehri as captured on a video camera in Portland, Maine, was shocking enough. But Hill had another, deeply visceral reaction. "Professional pride," he explained. "I saw these rotten-looking images in the newspaper, and thought, 'We can do better.'
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is preparing to sign a defense agreement with Singapore that will enable the United States to position warplanes and ships there, a move aimed at reducing American reliance on bases in the Philippines, U.S. officials say.
NEWS
May 12, 1986 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Rudyard Kipling described this dusty frontier capital near the Khyber Pass as a "city of evil countenances." Other cities lived, Peshawar lurked. Even the shadows here had shadows. In his 19th-Century stories and ballads, Kipling painted Peshawar as a place peopled by tribal warriors, smugglers, soldiers of fortune, spies--the playground for the great game of espionage between imperial Russia and its enemies. Peshawar (pronounced pesh-AH-wur) has not changed.
WORLD
May 8, 2003 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
At Singapore Changi Airport, passengers walk past a thermal-imaging scanner that instantly shows whether any of them has a fever. All over the city, taxi drivers, government workers, waitresses, bank tellers and bellboys take their temperatures at least once a day. So do visitors to government buildings, reporters going to news conferences and women arriving at the beauty parlor. Many residents proudly wear the country's new badge of honor: a sticker showing they are fever-free.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom has the Asia-Pacific region appeared as pacific as now. In a single year, the Soviet threat has disappeared. Hopes for peace in Indochina have emerged. Ever-hostile North and South Korea are talking reconciliation. And America is preparing to make up with Vietnam. Spots of tension remain. But in a sweep down the coast of the Asian continent and around Southeast Asia, nowhere can a powder keg be found before arriving at India and Pakistan and their potential for nuclear war.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singapore Wants to Purchase Lockheed F-16s: The U.S. Defense Department said Singapore wants to buy up to 18 of the fighter jets for $890 million. The sale--which would also include spare engines, air-to-air missiles and personnel training--will become official by year's end if Congress does not object. Lockheed, based in Calabasas, builds the F-16 in Ft. Worth, Tex. The company currently has an F-16 backlog of about 700 aircraft.
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