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January 17, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Goh Chok Tong bristled last week as he stood before his colleagues in Parliament and promoted a plan to change the electoral system here. "I don't think we are tinkering with the system," declared the first deputy prime minister. "We are making improvements . . . based on 22 years of working it. We are trying to remove a weakness." "Tinkering"--the word used by a government official to describe the reaction of some Singaporeans to the proposed change--carries a negative connotation, Goh, the No.
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NEWS
January 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong's party won all but two seats in the island nation's general election. The ruling People's Action Party, or PAP, won the election before the votes were cast when opposition parties decided to contest only 36 of Parliament's 83 seats. They had held four seats in the old assembly. Goh, who waged a fierce campaign focused on voters' pockets and sensitive racial issues, was jubilant. "This is a watershed election," he said.
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NEWS
September 4, 1988
Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew led his ruling party to its eighth straight election victory, winning 80 seats in the recently enlarged 81-member Parliament. There had been no doubt that the People's Action Party would win. When counting was completed early today, the party had won 69 of the 70 seats contested to combine with 11 seats in which its candidates were unopposed. Lee's party won 64.6% of the final vote, compared to 64.8% in the last election in 1984.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former Deputy Prime Minister Ong Teng Cheong became Singapore's first elected president Saturday despite a strong showing by a reluctant opponent who had barely campaigned. Backed by the ruling People's Action Party and the nation's labor unions, the 57-year-old Ong was heavily favored to win a six-year term in the newly strengthened post. He faced token opposition from Chua Kim Yeow, 67, a retired civil servant and banker who said he was urged to run in order to provide a contest.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | Reuters
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong easily won a special election Saturday and said he would use the results to reinvigorate his government. "You have given me your resounding endorsement for the policies of my government and leadership," Goh told supporters after the result. "I pledge on behalf of my colleagues and myself to safeguard the future of Singapore." Beaming, he told reporters Saturday night: "When I land a solid punch, I know it."
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong's party won all but two seats in the island nation's general election. The ruling People's Action Party, or PAP, won the election before the votes were cast when opposition parties decided to contest only 36 of Parliament's 83 seats. They had held four seats in the old assembly. Goh, who waged a fierce campaign focused on voters' pockets and sensitive racial issues, was jubilant. "This is a watershed election," he said.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In many countries, the last few days before a presidential election are filled with campaign rhetoric, political promises and a last gasp of hectic electioneering. But not here. This island nation of 3 million people is having its first-ever presidential election Saturday. But there are no rallies, no debates and no issues. In fact, one of the two candidates really doesn't want the job at all.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong, who has attempted to gradually relax Singapore's authoritarian system of rule, said Sunday that he is reviewing his style of government after what he considered to be an embarrassing decline in the ruling party's electoral popularity. By most standards, the People's Action Party scored a commanding victory by winning 77 of the 81 seats in the legislature in Saturday's elections. But the party's share of the vote fell to 61% from 63.2% in the last election in 1988.
NEWS
August 22, 1988
Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's ruling People's Action Party, preparing for Sept. 3 parliamentary elections, retired 14 veteran lawmakers, including several high-level ministers, in a major party shake-up. Goh Chok Tong, the party's assistant secretary general, said the shake-up, while "not a pleasant exercise . . . is part of a necessary self-renewal process."
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former Deputy Prime Minister Ong Teng Cheong became Singapore's first elected president Saturday despite a strong showing by a reluctant opponent who had barely campaigned. Backed by the ruling People's Action Party and the nation's labor unions, the 57-year-old Ong was heavily favored to win a six-year term in the newly strengthened post. He faced token opposition from Chua Kim Yeow, 67, a retired civil servant and banker who said he was urged to run in order to provide a contest.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Reuters
Ong Teng Cheong, who will be sworn in Wednesday as Singapore's first elected president, began his career as a private architect but eventually became the island nation's top labor leader and deputy prime minister. Ong was elected Saturday, taking 59% of the valid votes, a lower percentage than many expected in his race against former banker and onetime Accountant General Chua Kim Yeow. Ong, 57, joined the civil service as a town planner, but his first love has been trade unionism.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In many countries, the last few days before a presidential election are filled with campaign rhetoric, political promises and a last gasp of hectic electioneering. But not here. This island nation of 3 million people is having its first-ever presidential election Saturday. But there are no rallies, no debates and no issues. In fact, one of the two candidates really doesn't want the job at all.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | Reuters
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong easily won a special election Saturday and said he would use the results to reinvigorate his government. "You have given me your resounding endorsement for the policies of my government and leadership," Goh told supporters after the result. "I pledge on behalf of my colleagues and myself to safeguard the future of Singapore." Beaming, he told reporters Saturday night: "When I land a solid punch, I know it."
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong, who has attempted to gradually relax Singapore's authoritarian system of rule, said Sunday that he is reviewing his style of government after what he considered to be an embarrassing decline in the ruling party's electoral popularity. By most standards, the People's Action Party scored a commanding victory by winning 77 of the 81 seats in the legislature in Saturday's elections. But the party's share of the vote fell to 61% from 63.2% in the last election in 1988.
NEWS
September 4, 1988
Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew led his ruling party to its eighth straight election victory, winning 80 seats in the recently enlarged 81-member Parliament. There had been no doubt that the People's Action Party would win. When counting was completed early today, the party had won 69 of the 70 seats contested to combine with 11 seats in which its candidates were unopposed. Lee's party won 64.6% of the final vote, compared to 64.8% in the last election in 1984.
NEWS
August 22, 1988
Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew's ruling People's Action Party, preparing for Sept. 3 parliamentary elections, retired 14 veteran lawmakers, including several high-level ministers, in a major party shake-up. Goh Chok Tong, the party's assistant secretary general, said the shake-up, while "not a pleasant exercise . . . is part of a necessary self-renewal process."
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