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NEWS
June 20, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
A delegation from the World Press Freedom Committee failed Friday to persuade Singapore to lift restrictions it imposed on Time magazine and the Asian Wall Street Journal after disputes over what the government considered to be anti-Singapore articles. "We are not encouraged that change will take place," said the delegation's chairman, Washington attorney Leonard Marks, a former director of the U.S. Information Agency. Secretary of State George P.
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TRAVEL
December 30, 2012 | Andrew Bender
Think back, if you can, to 1965. The Gateway Arch in St. Louis was the year's architectural marvel, the world mourned Winston Churchill, and Pampers disposable diapers made their debut. Meanwhile, at the tip of the Malay Peninsula, the republic of Singapore declared its independence from Malaysia. Today, the Gateway Arch still inspires, Churchill's iconic status is unfettered, and what's a cloth diaper? But the Singapore of 1965? Barely recognizable. Except in one place: the island of Pulau Ubin, in the Johore Strait, which separates the city-state from Malaysia to the north.
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NEWS
May 19, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Asia ready for Western-style democracy? No, and it probably never will be, according to Lee Kuan Yew, the former prime minister of Singapore. In Lee's view, rugged individualism just doesn't fit in Asia's complex tapestry of cultural bonds.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
Thirteen people signed up Monday to be the first Singaporeans allowed to speak publicly without a license, police said. The 13 had come forward by late Monday, the first day of registration for those wanting to vent their opinions at a new "Speakers Corner" opening in Singapore on Sept. 1, said Chee Wing Cheong, an officer at the Kreta Ayer police post. For years, residents of this city-state wanting to speak out in public have had to wait for authorities to issue special licenses.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trade With Vietnam to Be Discussed: The Singapore government is planning negotiations designed to promote economic trade and cooperation with Vietnam. The countries decided to strengthen economic ties when Vu Khoan, Vietnamese deputy foreign minister, visited Singapore earlier this month. The two countries agreed to negotiate agreements on aviation, trade tariffs, investment and tourism.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Singapore government accused a U.S. diplomat Saturday of interfering in this Southeast Asian nation's domestic politics and asked that he be withdrawn. The Reagan Administration agreed to recall the envoy but defended him against the allegations. A Singapore government statement accused E. Mason Hendrickson, first secretary at the U.S. Embassy, of trying to persuade lawyers opposed to the government to run for public office and had suggested that campaign financing would not be a problem.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health care industry observers expressed surprise at Abbey Healthcare Group Inc.'s announcement Friday that the government of Singapore has bought a 5.56% stake in the Costa Mesa-based provider of home health care services. "It strikes me as really weird," said Jim McCamant, editor of the Berkeley-based Medical Technology Stock Letter. "You hear about (foreign) governments investing in their own companies but not in companies in other countries."
NEWS
August 18, 1988
Singapore's government dissolved Parliament and called general elections for next month, 15 months ahead of schedule. Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew advised President Wee Kim Wee to dissolve the 81-seat Parliament, a government statement said, and elections were scheduled for Sept. 3. The elections come amid mounting pressure on the government from the opposition, whose leaders accuse Lee of quashing dissent by throwing opponents in jail.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
Michael P. Fay, the American teen-ager who became the focus of a worldwide debate about crime and punishment when he was sentenced to be caned for vandalism, is being released from prison today. Fay is being turned loose early from his four-month prison sentence because of good behavior. In March, he was sentenced to jail, six strokes with a rattan cane and a $2,230 fine after pleading guilty to spray-painting cars and other acts of mischief.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case likely to strain U.S. relations with a longtime ally on the sensitive issue of human rights, a judge here Thursday sentenced an American teen-ager to be flogged six times with a rattan cane and to spend four months in prison for spray-painting cars and other acts of mischief. Michael P. Fay, 18, of Dayton, Ohio, was also ordered to pay a $2,230 fine after pleading guilty to two counts of vandalism, two counts of mischief and one count of receiving stolen property.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2000 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Singapore banned a recent television episode of "Ally McBeal" in which she contemplated a homosexual dalliance, the message seemed clear: The government remains firmly in charge of what its people see and hear. But this strong-willed government--known for controlling everything from bubble gum consumption to political dissent--has quietly given up its efforts to control the Internet.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two quarters of negative economic growth, Singapore is technically in recession. So what's the response of this city-state that is hardly larger than Zion National Park? Well, you could start with Singapore Airlines, ranked in many polls of business travelers as the world's best carrier. Singapore is spending $300 million to refurbish the fleet's cabins. Then there's the Internet.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This prosperous city-state is built on a mountain of insecurity. Surrounded by larger, occasionally hostile neighbors and devoid of natural resources, the Singapore government muzzled political dissent, armed itself with the best weapons money could buy and created a sophisticated trade entrepot backed by $60 billion in foreign reserves.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you want to find out what Singapore is all about and why it's not rattled by the Asian economic crisis, you might start at the old colonial convent on North Bridge Street that houses the Mass Rapid Transit offices. Inside the dim, ultramodern control room, half a dozen men sit at computers, loading in timetables and commands. A few feet away, a huge digital board tracks 80 rush-hour trains that are speeding under and over Singapore, each relentlessly on schedule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996
Countries that feel it's in their best interests to censor the Internet may find that in the process they are crippling their national growth in many ways, especially in the highly competitive area of international trade ("Cyber-Censorship Grows in East Asia" by Joshua Gordon, Commentary, Sept. 27). Today, there is no worldwide source of information except the Internet that can keep pace with the geometric progression of change. Yes, there is much "chaff" on the Internet. But, at the same time, it's the source of, among other things, hundreds of thousands of pages of scientific research and data.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
The collapse of Barings bank was precipitated by trader Nicholas Leeson, but "institutional incompetence" was ultimately to blame, the Singapore government said Tuesday. Citing the results of its inquiry into the collapse, the Finance Ministry said Barings showed a general lack of understanding of the futures trading business. The ministry said its inquiry, conducted by Price Waterhouse accountants, also found that Barings did not have enough internal controls. Barings collapsed Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996
Countries that feel it's in their best interests to censor the Internet may find that in the process they are crippling their national growth in many ways, especially in the highly competitive area of international trade ("Cyber-Censorship Grows in East Asia" by Joshua Gordon, Commentary, Sept. 27). Today, there is no worldwide source of information except the Internet that can keep pace with the geometric progression of change. Yes, there is much "chaff" on the Internet. But, at the same time, it's the source of, among other things, hundreds of thousands of pages of scientific research and data.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Singapore government on Monday began an unusual criminal case against an American university lecturer and a U.S.-owned newspaper for publishing commentary that argued that some regimes in Asia use their judiciary to bankrupt political opponents. The academic, Christopher Lingle, has refused to return to Singapore from his home in Atlanta to answer the charges against him and has submitted no defense in writing.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1994 | From Reuters
Singapore's push to be Asia's hub on the information superhighway is led by a 40-year-old air force reserve brigadier-general who believes new technology and conservative Asian values can thrive together. George Yong-Boon Yeo, minister for information and the arts, says Singapore could become Asia's broadcast and program production center despite the city-state's tough censorship laws. "We want to be everyone's favorite oasis on the information superhighway," Yeo told Reuters in an interview.
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