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NEWS
July 2, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene at the local Hard Rock Cafe was jumping on a Saturday night. Elvis was blaring out of the sound system, and the staff could barely keep up with the demand for burgers and beer. That's when the American woman lit a cigarette. The music seemed to choke in mid-croon. The American's table was surrounded by a wall of waiters. The offending butt was plucked from the startled woman's hand and whisked out of the restaurant.
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NEWS
July 2, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene at the local Hard Rock Cafe was jumping on a Saturday night. Elvis was blaring out of the sound system, and the staff could barely keep up with the demand for burgers and beer. That's when the American woman lit a cigarette. The music seemed to choke in mid-croon. The American's table was surrounded by a wall of waiters. The offending butt was plucked from the startled woman's hand and whisked out of the restaurant.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Bausch & Lomb Inc. failed to formally report nearly three dozen foreign cases of fungal eye infections later linked to one of its contact lens solutions, according to a federal warning letter. Bausch & Lomb didn't submit the 35 serious injury reports by April 7, as required by law, after Singapore health officials had alerted the Rochester, N.Y., company, the Food and Drug Administration said in the letter.
WORLD
September 24, 2003 | From Reuters
Investigators led by the World Health Organization said Tuesday that the world's first SARS case in three months was the result of an accident at a government-run laboratory in Singapore that was researching the disease. A 27-year-old Singaporean medical student tested positive Sept. 9 for severe acute respiratory syndrome, initially baffling the government after the WHO declared the world's SARS outbreak over in July. A panel of 11 experts from Singapore, the WHO and the U.S.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade-old medical mystery that has confounded investigators in the United States and Southeast Asia by killing young, apparently healthy Asian men in their sleep has taken a new turn with the deaths in a single day of two Thai construction workers in the island republic of Singapore. The two men, Wichit Khamwaen, 45, and Sitthi Sataisong, 27, apparently died in their sleep before dawn Monday.
WORLD
April 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
A team of international scientists landed Thursday in this city just west of Hong Kong and set to work hunting for clues to the origins of a fatal flu-like illness as the world death toll rose. Figures given to the World Health Organization team by officials in Guangdong province on China's southern coast indicate that fewer people in the hard-hit region are getting sick from severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, team spokesman Chris Powell said.
WORLD
December 18, 2003 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong implemented measures Wednesday to head off a recurrence of the springtime SARS outbreak after officials in Taipei confirmed that a 44-year-old scientist in the Taiwanese capital had contracted the pneumonia-like illness.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Bausch & Lomb Inc. voluntarily suspended shipment of a contact lens solution after federal health officials linked it Monday to a fungal eye infection that can cause temporary blindness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating 109 reports of Fusarium keratitis in patients in 17 states since June 2005. Federal and state health officials have interviewed just 30 of those patients.
NEWS
April 7, 1996 | PETER ENG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In Beijing, young cyclists race in the blue and white colors of Kent cigarettes, cheered on by fans wearing sun visors emblazoned with "Kent." In Bangkok, children play with toy racing cars bearing the logo of Japan's Mild Seven tobacco company. Philip Morris hands out fine arts prizes to young competitors in several Southeast Asian capitals.
WORLD
May 8, 2003 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
At Singapore Changi Airport, passengers walk past a thermal-imaging scanner that instantly shows whether any of them has a fever. All over the city, taxi drivers, government workers, waitresses, bank tellers and bellboys take their temperatures at least once a day. So do visitors to government buildings, reporters going to news conferences and women arriving at the beauty parlor. Many residents proudly wear the country's new badge of honor: a sticker showing they are fever-free.
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