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BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
NEWS
May 4, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Relations between press and government are chilled in Southeast Asia, with domestic and foreign publications alike facing restraints. A young generation of Asian reporters has been exposed, in theory at least, to Western press freedoms, and many are chafing under the controls. "I think that it is time we made a strong stand," Yazid Othman, a Malaysian and president of the Confederation of ASEAN Journalists, told a recent conference in Bangkok. He called on the member governments of the Assn.
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