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BUSINESS
February 22, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The Internet is everywhere in Singapore--on billboards, television, in the newspapers, in the mouths and minds of government officials and businesspeople, even in ads on taxis and buses. This country is betting its future on the Internet. Its ambitious plans, and its formidable capabilities, are likely to soon make it the world's most wired nation. Indeed, Singapore is poised to become the world's first true "digital nation."
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BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Western Digital Corp., the world's third-largest computer disk-drive maker, may move 70% of its manufacturing operations from Singapore to neighboring Malaysia by September, dealing a blow to the island state's electronics industry, Singapore's Business Times reported. The Irvine-based company's factory in eastern Singapore is expected to retain the production of high-end drives, which made up less than 5% of the 5.1 million drives it made in the March quarter.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Western Digital Corp., the world's third-largest computer disk-drive maker, may move 70% of its manufacturing operations from Singapore to neighboring Malaysia by September, dealing a blow to the island state's electronics industry, Singapore's Business Times reported. The Irvine-based company's factory in eastern Singapore is expected to retain the production of high-end drives, which made up less than 5% of the 5.1 million drives it made in the March quarter.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The Internet is everywhere in Singapore--on billboards, television, in the newspapers, in the mouths and minds of government officials and businesspeople, even in ads on taxis and buses. This country is betting its future on the Internet. Its ambitious plans, and its formidable capabilities, are likely to soon make it the world's most wired nation. Indeed, Singapore is poised to become the world's first true "digital nation."
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | JOE McDONALD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In other big Asian cities, growing wealth has unleashed a flood of cars, trucks and buses that foul the air with exhaust and snarl the streets with traffic jams that can stretch for miles. But even as Singapore has matched their growth, it has escaped the curse of traffic congestion. Its air is clean. A cab ride to the airport from downtown takes 15 minutes. This happy situation is no accident.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1985 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The President Jackson came alongside a wharf here at 7 a.m., inbound from Semarang, Indonesia. By 3 p.m., it had discharged its cargo, picked up another and was under way for Cochin, India. "When a ship isn't moving, it's losing money," shipping agents say. The port of Singapore, one of the world's busiest, moves them out. On any day, about 600 ships are in port here, moored in the anchorages or tied up alongside the more than nine miles of berths.
WORLD
May 8, 2003 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
At Singapore Changi Airport, passengers walk past a thermal-imaging scanner that instantly shows whether any of them has a fever. All over the city, taxi drivers, government workers, waitresses, bank tellers and bellboys take their temperatures at least once a day. So do visitors to government buildings, reporters going to news conferences and women arriving at the beauty parlor. Many residents proudly wear the country's new badge of honor: a sticker showing they are fever-free.
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