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BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
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NEWS
September 30, 2001 | REGAN MORRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When news anchor Zahara Abdul Lateef got furious with her 19-year-old Indonesian maid, she poured a jug of boiling water on her. It burned Tutik Rinawati's chest and back and landed Lateef in prison for two months earlier this year. Indonesians were outraged by the case, which highlighted the plight of female servants in this wealthy Southeast Asian city-state. Women from across Asia flock to Singapore to escape poverty but often wind up overworked and with no personal freedom.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | EVELYN RICHARDS, THE WASHINGTON POST
They arrive by foot and by bus, 3,000 at a time, and pour into a sparkling white plant the size of five football fields. There, they suit up in crisp pastel smocks, file into rows of immaculate workbenches and begin the arduous task of screwing, fastening and bending thin wires under the small lens of a microscope. Eight hours later, they are relieved by 3,000 fresh pairs of eyes and hands.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | EVELYN RICHARDS, THE WASHINGTON POST
They arrive by foot and by bus, 3,000 at a time, and pour into a sparkling white plant the size of five football fields. There, they suit up in crisp pastel smocks, file into rows of immaculate workbenches and begin the arduous task of screwing, fastening and bending thin wires under the small lens of a microscope. Eight hours later, they are relieved by 3,000 fresh pairs of eyes and hands.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Singapore, now seeking to encourage a baby boom after years of proclaiming that "two is enough," faces a long-term threat to its economy because of a labor shortage, a government report says. A labor shortage, rather than a lack of export markets, will curb growth in this small island republic in the years ahead, the Trade and Industry Ministry's Economic Survey for the third quarter of 1987 says.
NEWS
September 30, 2001 | REGAN MORRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When news anchor Zahara Abdul Lateef got furious with her 19-year-old Indonesian maid, she poured a jug of boiling water on her. It burned Tutik Rinawati's chest and back and landed Lateef in prison for two months earlier this year. Indonesians were outraged by the case, which highlighted the plight of female servants in this wealthy Southeast Asian city-state. Women from across Asia flock to Singapore to escape poverty but often wind up overworked and with no personal freedom.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | DAVID CHEW, PACIFIC RIM NEWS SERVICE
In an affluent society like Singapore with nearly full employment, being jobless is not much of a worry for most people. But it is for older workers--especially those with college educations. * Appearances are no reliable criteria for defining older workers, since there are young people who look rather "old" and old people exuding "youthfulness."
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Micropolis Corp. disclosed last week that for the first time in more than three years its quarterly earnings would be lower than year-earlier results. The reason: It's having trouble cutting manufacturing costs, and it faces increased competition. The announcement signals quite a change in the fortunes of the Chatsworth maker of computer disk drive data storage equipment.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, Times Staff Writer
Seizing what it views as a golden recruitment opportunity in the aftermath of China's military crackdown in June, the government of Singapore is eyeing the highly skilled pool of Chinese students in the United States. Singapore faces a shortage of engineers needed by international companies, and officials are hoping some of the students may welcome the chance to work in Singapore, rather than going home when their student visas expire.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Singapore, now seeking to encourage a baby boom after years of proclaiming that "two is enough," faces a long-term threat to its economy because of a labor shortage, a government report says. A labor shortage, rather than a lack of export markets, will curb growth in this small island republic in the years ahead, the Trade and Industry Ministry's Economic Survey for the third quarter of 1987 says.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Compared with some of Europe's basket-case economies, Denmark is doing fairly well right now. But that's little consolation to Ole Ladefoged. Ladefoged, who looks younger than his 37 years, was laid off from his job taking care of children in a day-care center two years ago and hasn't been able to find work since. With Denmark's unemployment rate at 12.3% and rising, competition for jobs is growing fiercer and fiercer.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1985 | Associated Press
Ask a dozen experts why the United States has so much trouble selling products in Japan and here's what they'll say: - It's not so much tariffs on foreign products, although Japan has some. - It's not so much quotas or other restrictions, although Japan has some of those too. - And it's not that there's a Japanese xenophobia; in fact, they love some familiar American names--Coca-Cola, McDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Schick, Gillette, even Disneyland.
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