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November 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a U.S. naval task force led by the carrier Midway steamed into Singapore's harbor last month on its way to the Middle East, it was an indication of the close military relationship that Washington enjoys with this tiny island nation. But the visit of several thousand U.S.
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NEWS
November 19, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Singaporean government announced Friday that it is bringing contempt of court charges against an American academic and a U.S.-owned newspaper for publishing an opinion article critical of the human rights records of Asian regimes.
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NEWS
April 1, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A court here Thursday rejected an American teen-ager's appeal against a sentence of flogging for spray-painting cars, saying he had pursued a "calculated course of criminal conduct." Without a trace of emotion, Michael Fay, 18, of Dayton, Ohio, was led from the high court by police to begin serving a four-month jail term in the case, which has attracted worldwide attention because of the flogging. Marco Chan, Fay's stepfather, left the court without comment.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the furor over the flogging of American teen-ager Michael Fay had begun to fade, the government here has confronted the Clinton Administration with a new controversy: A 51-year-old American businessman has been prevented from leaving this country after being charged with various offenses, from using abusive language to assault.
NEWS
April 2, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Singapore is one of the safest countries in the world," wrote Keith Kimball of Vallejo, Calif., in a letter to Secretary of State Warren Christopher. "We should have those tough kinds of punishment in America." A Singapore court's decision to sentence an American teen-ager to a flogging for spray-painting cars has produced a predictable nod of approval from many Singaporeans, long accustomed to their government's firm hand.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A war of words between the United States and Singapore over the sentencing of an American teen-ager to a flogging for vandalism heightened Tuesday with the government here disputing President Clinton's comments on the case. The teen-ager, Michael P. Fay of Dayton, Ohio, was sentenced last week to six strokes of a rattan cane and four months in prison after pleading guilty to two charges of spray-painting cars, two counts of mischief and possessing stolen property. He was also fined $2,230.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singapore Gum Ban Protested: Warner-Lambert Co. plans to appeal a new law in Singapore that bans the import and sale of chewing gum. The company, which produces gum under the Chicklets label, said it wants an extension that would allow it time to sell remaining supplies in that country. Singapore last week outlawed the manufacture, sale and importation of chewing gum. The government said "spent chewing gum has caused (subway) train disruptions as they prevent the train doors from closing.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government on Saturday defended its controversial policy of flogging vandals and said it is absurd for critics from countries with high crime rates to question Singapore's approach. The defense of the justice system was made by Home Affairs Minister Wong Kan Seng after nearly a month of increasingly vitriolic exchanges between Singapore and the United States over the decision to sentence an 18-year-old American, Michael P. Fay, to six strokes of a rattan cane for spray-painting cars.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the furor over the flogging of American teen-ager Michael Fay had begun to fade, the government here has confronted the Clinton Administration with a new controversy: A 51-year-old American businessman has been prevented from leaving this country after being charged with various offenses, from using abusive language to assault.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | Reuters
The government has banned imports of fighting dogs, including American pit bull terriers and Japanese Tosas and Akitas, the government said Monday.
TRAVEL
May 22, 1994 | EDWARD WRIGHT, Wright is a former assistant foreign editor at The Times. His column appears monthly
In the wake of the controversial caning of 18-year-old Michael Fay, the American convicted of spray painting cars, the U.S. State Department is reminding travelers of Singapore's strict penalties for a variety of offenses that might be considered minor in the United States, including jaywalking, littering and spitting, as well as the importation and sale of chewing gum. In addition, Singapore has a mandatory death penalty for many narcotics offenses.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singapore's government said early today that it had reprimanded two U.S. diplomats because of what it termed "false reports" about how much American teen-ager Michael P. Fay suffered during a flogging for vandalism. The two-month controversy about the Fay case, which has strained relations between the United States and one of its longtime allies, blossomed into a full-fledged war of words over news reports that the youth had been "bloodied" by the punishment.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government said today that there is no reason to grant clemency to an American teen-ager sentenced to a flogging for spray-painting cars, but it announced that the punishment of six strokes of the rattan cane has been reduced to four as a "gesture" to President Clinton. A government statement said the Cabinet had reviewed the clemency appeal filed by lawyers for Michael P. Fay, 18, and "found no special circumstances which justify commuting the sentence of caning."
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An American teen-ager sentenced to be flogged for vandalism ended his first month in jail without word on whether the government will accept or reject his plea for mercy. An official who requested anonymity said the case of Michael Fay, 18, was discussed at a Cabinet meeting, but no decision had been reached on the clemency plea. Fay was charged with spray-painting cars and other acts of vandalism in October.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government on Saturday defended its controversial policy of flogging vandals and said it is absurd for critics from countries with high crime rates to question Singapore's approach. The defense of the justice system was made by Home Affairs Minister Wong Kan Seng after nearly a month of increasingly vitriolic exchanges between Singapore and the United States over the decision to sentence an 18-year-old American, Michael P. Fay, to six strokes of a rattan cane for spray-painting cars.
NEWS
April 2, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Singapore is one of the safest countries in the world," wrote Keith Kimball of Vallejo, Calif., in a letter to Secretary of State Warren Christopher. "We should have those tough kinds of punishment in America." A Singapore court's decision to sentence an American teen-ager to a flogging for spray-painting cars has produced a predictable nod of approval from many Singaporeans, long accustomed to their government's firm hand.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Singapore's government said early today that it had reprimanded two U.S. diplomats because of what it termed "false reports" about how much American teen-ager Michael P. Fay suffered during a flogging for vandalism. The two-month controversy about the Fay case, which has strained relations between the United States and one of its longtime allies, blossomed into a full-fledged war of words over news reports that the youth had been "bloodied" by the punishment.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A court here Thursday rejected an American teen-ager's appeal against a sentence of flogging for spray-painting cars, saying he had pursued a "calculated course of criminal conduct." Without a trace of emotion, Michael Fay, 18, of Dayton, Ohio, was led from the high court by police to begin serving a four-month jail term in the case, which has attracted worldwide attention because of the flogging. Marco Chan, Fay's stepfather, left the court without comment.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A war of words between the United States and Singapore over the sentencing of an American teen-ager to a flogging for vandalism heightened Tuesday with the government here disputing President Clinton's comments on the case. The teen-ager, Michael P. Fay of Dayton, Ohio, was sentenced last week to six strokes of a rattan cane and four months in prison after pleading guilty to two charges of spray-painting cars, two counts of mischief and possessing stolen property. He was also fined $2,230.
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