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NEWS
December 20, 1992 | Reuters
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong easily won a special election Saturday and said he would use the results to reinvigorate his government. "You have given me your resounding endorsement for the policies of my government and leadership," Goh told supporters after the result. "I pledge on behalf of my colleagues and myself to safeguard the future of Singapore." Beaming, he told reporters Saturday night: "When I land a solid punch, I know it."
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NEWS
December 14, 1995 | From Associated Press
David Marshall, a major figure in Singapore's struggle for independence and early development, died Tuesday. He was 87. Marshall had been suffering from lung cancer, a family spokesman said. He was elected to lead British-ruled Singapore in 1955, when his Labor Front coalition won the first election that gave the island a measure of internal self-government. He resigned the next year when constitutional talks for greater self-rule broke down.
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NEWS
December 18, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the Singapore government's efforts to ensure a smooth transition to a younger generation of political leaders, illness has dramatically intervened and left the future shape of the government unclear. The uncertainty was reflected in the decision by Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong to resign his own seat in Parliament and call a local election for Saturday, which will become, in effect, a referendum on his handling of the top job.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Reuters
Ong Teng Cheong, who will be sworn in Wednesday as Singapore's first elected president, began his career as a private architect but eventually became the island nation's top labor leader and deputy prime minister. Ong was elected Saturday, taking 59% of the valid votes, a lower percentage than many expected in his race against former banker and onetime Accountant General Chua Kim Yeow. Ong, 57, joined the civil service as a town planner, but his first love has been trade unionism.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Reuters
Ong Teng Cheong, who will be sworn in Wednesday as Singapore's first elected president, began his career as a private architect but eventually became the island nation's top labor leader and deputy prime minister. Ong was elected Saturday, taking 59% of the valid votes, a lower percentage than many expected in his race against former banker and onetime Accountant General Chua Kim Yeow. Ong, 57, joined the civil service as a town planner, but his first love has been trade unionism.
NEWS
December 14, 1995 | From Associated Press
David Marshall, a major figure in Singapore's struggle for independence and early development, died Tuesday. He was 87. Marshall had been suffering from lung cancer, a family spokesman said. He was elected to lead British-ruled Singapore in 1955, when his Labor Front coalition won the first election that gave the island a measure of internal self-government. He resigned the next year when constitutional talks for greater self-rule broke down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1994
Your editorial "Onerous Price for Tidiness" (April 5) attacked Singapore as "a repressive place whose disgraceful standards of political participation, press freedom and criminal justice are unattractive by any modern gauge." If Singapore really is a repressive place, why do 6 million tourists visit every year? They move about freely without fear of being raped, mugged or murdered. It this possible in major U.S. cities? You alleged that Singapore "has the trappings of parliamentary democracy, but little of the reality," and that "the People's Action Party has exercised one-party control since independence in 1965."
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | EDWARD HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
SINGAPORE--Fifteen-year-old Kalliste Oh doesn't make her bed. She also doesn't clean her room, or iron her private-school uniforms or straighten her 50 pairs of shoes. That's what her family's three Filipino maids are for, she says. Oh says she can't perform basic domestic duties and has never held an after-school or summer job. "Whatever I need, I ask for," she says, whiling away a muggy afternoon inside one of Singapore's air-conditioned havens for teen consumers. "It's true, I can't do anything."
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | KEITH B. RICHBURG, THE WASHINGTON POST
After more than 25 years of ruling this prosperous island city-state with an iron hand, Lee Kuan Yew has announced that he will step down as prime minister later this year to make way for younger leaders who promise a more relaxed style of governing.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | Reuters
Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong easily won a special election Saturday and said he would use the results to reinvigorate his government. "You have given me your resounding endorsement for the policies of my government and leadership," Goh told supporters after the result. "I pledge on behalf of my colleagues and myself to safeguard the future of Singapore." Beaming, he told reporters Saturday night: "When I land a solid punch, I know it."
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the Singapore government's efforts to ensure a smooth transition to a younger generation of political leaders, illness has dramatically intervened and left the future shape of the government unclear. The uncertainty was reflected in the decision by Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong to resign his own seat in Parliament and call a local election for Saturday, which will become, in effect, a referendum on his handling of the top job.
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