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NEWS
January 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is success spoiling Singapore? In 25 years since independence, this island nation has grown from a swampy backwater getting much of its income as a base for Britain's imperial fleet to one of the economic powerhouses of Asia. Per capita income is more than $8,000 a year, ahead of Spain and on a par with New Zealand. Singapore's 2.6 million people also enjoy some of the best amenities in Asia, including a $2.
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NEWS
January 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is success spoiling Singapore? In 25 years since independence, this island nation has grown from a swampy backwater getting much of its income as a base for Britain's imperial fleet to one of the economic powerhouses of Asia. Per capita income is more than $8,000 a year, ahead of Spain and on a par with New Zealand. Singapore's 2.6 million people also enjoy some of the best amenities in Asia, including a $2.
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NEWS
January 29, 1987 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew hopes Singaporeans will produce plenty of babies in the new Chinese Year of the Rabbit starting today. In a message to mark the year end, he said only 26,000 ethnic Chinese babies were born in the outgoing Year of the Tiger in Singapore, 15,000 short of the 41,000 needed to maintain the population. "I hope we can do better this Year of the Rabbit," he said.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Singapore, now seeking to encourage a baby boom after years of proclaiming that "two is enough," faces a long-term threat to its economy because of a labor shortage, a government report says. A labor shortage, rather than a lack of export markets, will curb growth in this small island republic in the years ahead, the Trade and Industry Ministry's Economic Survey for the third quarter of 1987 says.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Singapore, now seeking to encourage a baby boom after years of proclaiming that "two is enough," faces a long-term threat to its economy because of a labor shortage, a government report says. A labor shortage, rather than a lack of export markets, will curb growth in this small island republic in the years ahead, the Trade and Industry Ministry's Economic Survey for the third quarter of 1987 says.
NEWS
September 6, 1985 | From Reuters
A census showed Singapore's population was 2,556,000 at the end of June, the government reported.
OPINION
January 24, 1993 | EDWARD LIU, Edward Liu is an attorney and activist in Asian-American issues in San Francisco.
I cringe when the mainstream media laud President Clinton's diversity theme in the choice and selection of his Cabinet and staff. Unless Clinton is using an expurgated Southern edition of the American dictionary, his definition of diversity and mine simply do not jibe. In this country of increasingly disparate ethnic and cultural groups, diversity can no longer be viewed under the obsolete paradigm of black/white relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1990
His legacy to Asia is indisputable. His vision for his tiny island nation unwavering. But can he let go? Lee Kuan Yew, the brilliant architect and leader of modern Singapore, is stepping down Wednesday after 31 years as prime minister. But he will remain a power broker, looming large over Singapore's second generation of leaders. That's not all to the good.
NEWS
March 24, 1985 | KENNETH L. WHITING, Associated Press
In a world of cities crushed by population and crumbling in poverty, the prosperous city-state of Singapore qualifies as an urban success story--by almost any measure. Where slums once spread over the landscape, new high-rise apartments now house 80% of the population of 2.5 million. Superhighways thread through the tiny island, a new subway system is being built, the air is clean, crime infrequent and the garbage is picked up every day.
NEWS
November 16, 1993
The vast Pacific Ocean touches the shorelines of at least 40 independent countries, including the western flank of Central and Latin America and the tiny island-nations scattered across the South Pacific. Ten other Asian nations are either landlocked or border the Indian Ocean. Levels of economic and social development vary widely across the region, challenging efforts to define common interests.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew hopes Singaporeans will produce plenty of babies in the new Chinese Year of the Rabbit starting today. In a message to mark the year end, he said only 26,000 ethnic Chinese babies were born in the outgoing Year of the Tiger in Singapore, 15,000 short of the 41,000 needed to maintain the population. "I hope we can do better this Year of the Rabbit," he said.
OPINION
February 28, 1993 | Elizabeth Lu, Elizabeth Lu writes about the Pacific Rim.
A popular T-shirt seen around Singapore says it all: No importing chewing gum, $10,000. No spitting, $1,000. No urinating in lifts, $500. The question, some joked, is wheth er one day wearing the T-shirt will be added to the list of prohibited activities subject to fines. In Singapore, domestic and international publications are tightly controlled, films are censored, the political opposition remains small and closely monitored and a plethora of rules and regulations dictates the lives of Singaporeans.
NEWS
May 21, 1991
Australia Population: 16.9 million Population growth rate: 1.3% Land area: 2.96 million sq. miles GNP (per capita): $14,300 (1989 est.) Literacy rate: 98.5% People per doctor: 438 Infant mortality: 8 per 1,000 live births Life expectancy: 73 male, 80 female Form of government: Federal parliamentary democracy * China Population: 1.1 billion Population growth rate: 1.4 Land area: 3.
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