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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997
"Why Tiny Singapore Is at Top of the Class" (Feb. 23), on the educational system of Singapore, makes American educators and parents think. Everything starts with discipline. Discipline starts with uniforms. Family is the first place to teach kids discipline. Today kids are allowed some unnecessary freedom at home and at school. Globalization is underway. America might miss the train. HOANG HA THANH
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NEWS
November 4, 2001 | HEATHER PATERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Men outnumber women two to one at Singapore's only medical school thanks to a government quota system that gives preference to lower-scoring males over brighter females. National University of Singapore limits female enrollment because, officials argue, women leave the profession to have babies and this city-state cannot afford to subsidize expensive educations for those who don't make medicine a lifetime career. Dr.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The Internet is everywhere in Singapore--on billboards, television, in the newspapers, in the mouths and minds of government officials and businesspeople, even in ads on taxis and buses. This country is betting its future on the Internet. Its ambitious plans, and its formidable capabilities, are likely to soon make it the world's most wired nation. Indeed, Singapore is poised to become the world's first true "digital nation."
BUSINESS
February 22, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The Internet is everywhere in Singapore--on billboards, television, in the newspapers, in the mouths and minds of government officials and businesspeople, even in ads on taxis and buses. This country is betting its future on the Internet. Its ambitious plans, and its formidable capabilities, are likely to soon make it the world's most wired nation. Indeed, Singapore is poised to become the world's first true "digital nation."
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Slouching as only adolescents can, the 1,000 students of Damai Secondary School hang out in ragged rows, awaiting the ritual that starts every day. "Keep still," Principal James Ong urges them over a loudspeaker as they assemble in front of the school. "Hurry up!" On the dot of 7:25 a.m., one student shouts, "Attention!" and they snap to. Straight-backed, hands on hearts, they sing the national anthem as the red-and-white flag of Singapore is raised.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colas to Be Banned at Schools: The government, which tries to promote proper habits among citizens in the name of health and prosperity, is turning its eye toward sugar-laden soft drinks. Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola will be banned from sale in schools beginning in June, the Straits Times newspaper said. The aim is to promote a healthy lifestyle and reduce student obesity, an Education Ministry spokesman said.
NEWS
November 4, 2001 | HEATHER PATERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Men outnumber women two to one at Singapore's only medical school thanks to a government quota system that gives preference to lower-scoring males over brighter females. National University of Singapore limits female enrollment because, officials argue, women leave the profession to have babies and this city-state cannot afford to subsidize expensive educations for those who don't make medicine a lifetime career. Dr.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2000 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Singapore banned a recent television episode of "Ally McBeal" in which she contemplated a homosexual dalliance, the message seemed clear: The government remains firmly in charge of what its people see and hear. But this strong-willed government--known for controlling everything from bubble gum consumption to political dissent--has quietly given up its efforts to control the Internet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997
"Why Tiny Singapore Is at Top of the Class" (Feb. 23), on the educational system of Singapore, makes American educators and parents think. Everything starts with discipline. Discipline starts with uniforms. Family is the first place to teach kids discipline. Today kids are allowed some unnecessary freedom at home and at school. Globalization is underway. America might miss the train. HOANG HA THANH
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Slouching as only adolescents can, the 1,000 students of Damai Secondary School hang out in ragged rows, awaiting the ritual that starts every day. "Keep still," Principal James Ong urges them over a loudspeaker as they assemble in front of the school. "Hurry up!" On the dot of 7:25 a.m., one student shouts, "Attention!" and they snap to. Straight-backed, hands on hearts, they sing the national anthem as the red-and-white flag of Singapore is raised.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colas to Be Banned at Schools: The government, which tries to promote proper habits among citizens in the name of health and prosperity, is turning its eye toward sugar-laden soft drinks. Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola will be banned from sale in schools beginning in June, the Straits Times newspaper said. The aim is to promote a healthy lifestyle and reduce student obesity, an Education Ministry spokesman said.
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