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BUSINESS
March 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Corporate, Income Taxes Lowered: Singapore Finance Minister Richard Hu unveiled budget-cutting corporate and income taxes as well as offering incentives to companies. Presenting the government budget in Parliament for the fiscal year April 1, 1993, to March 31, 1994, Hu announced a three-percentage-point reduction in corporate and income taxes, both to become effective this year.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singapore Budget Expected to Include Tax Cut: The government's fiscal 1994 spending plan is likely to contain a corporate tax cut of about 2%, but not the kind of extra perks that could spark the listless stock market, analysts said. This year's biggest change in the government's tax policy is already on its way in the form of a 3% goods and services tax, which goes into effect in April.
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NEWS
May 14, 1989 | RUTH YOUNGBLOOD, United Press International
Wong Siew Hoon figured she would do her patriotic best to comply with the government's exhortations to juggle a job and a large family. With the help of a full-time maid, Wong planned a third child while maintaining her position as personnel assistant in a production firm. But a sudden crackdown on foreign workers has left Wong bewildered. Smacked with a $100-a-month levy on her Filipino maid starting in July, Wong and other working mothers say naive officials are sabotaging a baby boom and intensifying the acute labor shortage by turning essential household help into a luxury.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | RUTH YOUNGBLOOD, United Press International
Wong Siew Hoon figured she would do her patriotic best to comply with the government's exhortations to juggle a job and a large family. With the help of a full-time maid, Wong planned a third child while maintaining her position as personnel assistant in a production firm. But a sudden crackdown on foreign workers has left Wong bewildered. Smacked with a $100-a-month levy on her Filipino maid starting in July, Wong and other working mothers say naive officials are sabotaging a baby boom and intensifying the acute labor shortage by turning essential household help into a luxury.
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