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BUSINESS
May 7, 2003 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
The United States signed an agreement with Singapore on Tuesday that will lower barriers on $33 billion in two-way trade and provide tougher copyright protection for U.S. entertainment companies operating in the wealthy Asian city-state. The two countries also struck a compromise in the global culture wars. Under the pact, Singapore will maintain control over domestic television programming but give U.S.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 2003 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
The United States signed an agreement with Singapore on Tuesday that will lower barriers on $33 billion in two-way trade and provide tougher copyright protection for U.S. entertainment companies operating in the wealthy Asian city-state. The two countries also struck a compromise in the global culture wars. Under the pact, Singapore will maintain control over domestic television programming but give U.S.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 2002 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Some California technology firms will enjoy lower tariffs and streamlined customs processing under a wide-ranging free-trade agreement announced Tuesday between the U.S. and Singapore. The pact, the first for the United States in Asia, is expected to bolster U.S. efforts to create a free-trade zone across the southeast part of the continent, already the third-largest market for U.S. goods. Expanding U.S.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2002 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Some California technology firms will enjoy lower tariffs and streamlined customs processing under a wide-ranging free-trade agreement announced Tuesday between the U.S. and Singapore. The pact, the first for the United States in Asia, is expected to bolster U.S. efforts to create a free-trade zone across the southeast part of the continent, already the third-largest market for U.S. goods. Expanding U.S.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trade Totals Rise in April: Total trade grew 19.6% to $16.9 billion in April from $14.3 billion for that month last year, according to the Singapore Trade Development Board. Total trade volume grew 13% in April, based on a three-month moving average. Volume of imports rose 10.6%, and volume of exports rose 15.6%. Non-oil domestic exports--led by higher demand for computer chips, disk drives, microcomputers and other goods--grew 16.7% in volume. Re-exports grew 17.5%.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf crisis and downturns in major Western economies are taking a toll on Singapore, one of Asia's economic "tigers." The nation--one of the world's fastest-growing economies with near double-digit growth rates in recent years--on Tuesday forecast sharply lower growth in 1991 because of the Middle Eastern upheaval and economic slowdowns in the United States and other key trading partners.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, TIMES INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT
Like thunderbolts out of the South China Sea, the Chinese capitalists who transformed Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore into Southeast Asia's "Little Dragons" are rattling U.S., Canadian and Australian cities with jolts of investment and immigration. Even by Pacific Rim standards, the shifts of capital and people are dramatic. In effect, entrepreneurs are forming an ethnic Chinese rim around the Pacific Basin.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
"This war in Afghanistan is a terrible, terrible thing," declared the merchant of Oriental carpets, running his hand over the smooth weave of a dark red Turkoman hatchli. "Terrible--but a blessing in disguise." Around him, in a sales room here in Singapore, far from the conflicts on the plateaus of western Asia, stacks of carpets lay heaped on the floor.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1989 | From United Press International
With the flick of a switch, a pile driver crushed 4,300 bottles of fake perfume while devotees of genuine scents cheered. The "destruction ceremony" at a posh shopping area was specially arranged by Yves Saint Laurent after a 16-month investigation uncovered a massive international counterfeit perfume operation. "This has been a major breakthrough," said Yann Kerlau, the French firm's general counsel. "However, this is not the end."
BUSINESS
September 25, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exports Surge in August: The Trade Development Board said non-oil domestic exports expanded 19.2% from a year earlier, led by microcomputers, disk drives, integrated circuits, videocassette recorders and other electronic equipment. The August figure compares with an annual export growth of 13.1% in July, revised up from a previously reported 12.6%, and with 9% in June. The figures are adjusted for inflation.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ride on a cable-car to the tiny islet of Sentosa reveals a sight that's hard to imagine from the spotless streets and sterile buildings on shore: Stretched out below is a vast container port, and crowding Keppel Harbor are too many ships to be counted. The commercial armada stretches to the horizon beyond Sentosa, lying at anchor in silent parking-lot formation, waiting to refill their holds and set sail.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf crisis and downturns in major Western economies are taking a toll on Singapore, one of Asia's economic "tigers." The nation--one of the world's fastest-growing economies with near double-digit growth rates in recent years--on Tuesday forecast sharply lower growth in 1991 because of the Middle Eastern upheaval and economic slowdowns in the United States and other key trading partners.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, TIMES INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT
Like thunderbolts out of the South China Sea, the Chinese capitalists who transformed Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore into Southeast Asia's "Little Dragons" are rattling U.S., Canadian and Australian cities with jolts of investment and immigration. Even by Pacific Rim standards, the shifts of capital and people are dramatic. In effect, entrepreneurs are forming an ethnic Chinese rim around the Pacific Basin.
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