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NEWS
November 9, 1987 | Associated Press
The world's newest subway opened for business over the weekend, with thousands of Singaporeans swarming into the sleek, silver-gray, Japanese-built cars. Sliding glass doors are mounted along the edges of all the system's underground platforms to prevent cooled air from escaping into the tunnel. All trains and underground stations are air-conditioned. The $2.
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NEWS
February 3, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As anyone who has traveled to Asia recently knows only too well, the downside of the region's economic boom is traffic. Newly enriched middle classes from Jakarta to Bangkok have rushed out and bought cars. Now gridlock--and its collateral woes, such as air pollution--menaces Hong Kong, Taipei, Kuala Lumpur, Manila and even Ho Chi Minh City.
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NEWS
April 3, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Some of the gentlemen at the Cricket Club, surveying the pitch over pink gins, insist that the drainage hasn't been right since the tunnel borer passed by. Taxi drivers worry about the competition. But that's just a ripple of dissent in the wave of initial enthusiasm for Singapore's new rapid transit rail system, which began operating last November. The key downtown link was opened a little later, and the people of Singapore are sold on the system's speed.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the time-honored tradition of car salesmen everywhere, James Chua powered up a 10-megawatt smile as soon as the customer set foot in his Toyota showroom. But just when you expected the hard sell, Chua began to apologize profusely. "These prices are so crazy," Chua lamented to a visitor. "We gotta feel sorry for the car buyer." Talk about sticker shock.
NEWS
February 3, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As anyone who has traveled to Asia recently knows only too well, the downside of the region's economic boom is traffic. Newly enriched middle classes from Jakarta to Bangkok have rushed out and bought cars. Now gridlock--and its collateral woes, such as air pollution--menaces Hong Kong, Taipei, Kuala Lumpur, Manila and even Ho Chi Minh City.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the time-honored tradition of car salesmen everywhere, James Chua powered up a 10-megawatt smile as soon as the customer set foot in his Toyota showroom. But just when you expected the hard sell, Chua began to apologize profusely. "These prices are so crazy," Chua lamented to a visitor. "We gotta feel sorry for the car buyer." Talk about sticker shock.
OPINION
April 17, 2005 | Jonathan Richmond, Jonathan Richmond, a visiting fellow at the Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand, is the author of "Transport of Delight -- The Mythical Conception of Rail Transit in Los Angeles."
To defeat gridlock, Southern Californians must elect better-educated politicians and together accept sometimes-painful solutions. Like a beautifully wrapped toy train at Christmas, shiny new light-rail projects offer an excuse to cut ribbons. But this symbolic mode of transportation will lead Los Angeles nowhere. L.A.
TRAVEL
February 9, 1986 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
To the uninitiated, a first look at Singapore might lead one to believe that it is nothing but a clean concrete machine, distinctly lacking in character, up-tight and obsessed with rules. To be sure, Singapore is one of the cleanest places I have ever visited (the fine for littering ranges from stiff to intolerable). It is also notorious for being the only venue in a David Bowie worldwide tour where the concert promoter lost money due to a lack of ticket sales.
TRAVEL
January 15, 1989 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
It seems that few people were happier to ring in the new year than most major U.S. airlines. The arrival of 1989 meant that the airlines could, for the moment at least, call an end to many of their frequent-flier mileage promotions, limit new mileage awards and severely restrict others. First to go in 1989: triple mileage. It began, you might remember, with a joint promotion hatched by Delta Airlines and American Express.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2003 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Importers are bracing for potentially costly delays at crowded ports in Asia this weekend when the U.S. begins enforcing a tough regulation aimed at preventing terrorists from turning cargo containers into deadly weapons. Firms that do not provide U.S. Customs with an accurate list of cargo 24 hours before departure will not be allowed to load their containers onto ships bound for the U.S. By pre-screening cargo, the agency hopes to catch suspicious shipments before they leave foreign ports.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Some of the gentlemen at the Cricket Club, surveying the pitch over pink gins, insist that the drainage hasn't been right since the tunnel borer passed by. Taxi drivers worry about the competition. But that's just a ripple of dissent in the wave of initial enthusiasm for Singapore's new rapid transit rail system, which began operating last November. The key downtown link was opened a little later, and the people of Singapore are sold on the system's speed.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | Associated Press
The world's newest subway opened for business over the weekend, with thousands of Singaporeans swarming into the sleek, silver-gray, Japanese-built cars. Sliding glass doors are mounted along the edges of all the system's underground platforms to prevent cooled air from escaping into the tunnel. All trains and underground stations are air-conditioned. The $2.
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