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Singers Contracts

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NEWS
March 21, 1991 | ALAN CITRON and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a thriller of a deal, pop icon Michael Jackson has signed a long-term contract with Sony Corp. that guarantees him an unprecedented share of the profits from his next six albums, his own record label, a role in developing video software products and a shot at movie stardom. The contract, the biggest ever awarded an entertainer, is expected to return hundreds of millions of dollars to Jackson.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 2001 | Chuck Philips
In an apparent first-round victory for music conglomerates, a Los Angeles judge denied most of the arguments presented in rock star Courtney Love's attempt to break her contract with Vivendi Universal. Superior Court Judge Fumiko Wasserman denied 11 of 15 causes of action listed in Love's lawsuit, including her challenge to a provision in California's seven-year-statute that could have paved the way for recording artists to become free agents.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | (Marla Matzer)
Singer Toni Braxton filed suit against La Face Records and its parent company, Arista Records, seeking to terminate her recording contract. The case, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, invokes a 50-year-old California law designed to protect movie actors from long-term studio deals. The so-called seven-year rule bars employers from enforcing personal-service contracts for more than seven years. By this measurement, the suit claims Braxton's contract should have expired in August 1996.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | ANN O'NEILL
Some people go online for the smut. We sign on for the dirt. And nothing the Internet has to offer quite matches our favorite guilty pleasure, thesmokinggun.com. While other gossip sites deliver rumor and spin, the Smoking Gun serves up documents. Most recently, the Gun has been pointed at the backstage demands of some of the music world's most popular acts, with deliciously dishy results. It's even educational.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | ANN O'NEILL
Some people go online for the smut. We sign on for the dirt. And nothing the Internet has to offer quite matches our favorite guilty pleasure, thesmokinggun.com. While other gossip sites deliver rumor and spin, the Smoking Gun serves up documents. Most recently, the Gun has been pointed at the backstage demands of some of the music world's most popular acts, with deliciously dishy results. It's even educational.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2001 | Chuck Philips
In an apparent first-round victory for music conglomerates, a Los Angeles judge denied most of the arguments presented in rock star Courtney Love's attempt to break her contract with Vivendi Universal. Superior Court Judge Fumiko Wasserman denied 11 of 15 causes of action listed in Love's lawsuit, including her challenge to a provision in California's seven-year-statute that could have paved the way for recording artists to become free agents.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pop star George Michael's career rests on his next performance. One year after the singer filed suit to sever his contract with Sony Music Entertainment Ltd., his case comes to trial here Monday, with Michael as the first witness. While any superstar case attracts publicity, Michael's case against the United Kingdom unit of Sony Corp. is garnering particular attention because of the broader ramifications for the record business.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Pop singer Toni Braxton has filed for bankruptcy protection in Los Angeles. Three companies owned by the Grammy-winning R & B artist also filed for Chapter 7 under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The move comes just eight weeks after Braxton filed a lawsuit against La Face Records and its parent company, Arista Records, seeking to terminate her recording contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Martha Wash, the singer who says that hers is the real voice behind the pop groups Black Box, Seduction and C&C Music Factory, has signed an eight-year, eight-album contract with RCA. The contract was part of a settlement agreement between Wash and RCA, whom the singer sued after learning that a model lip-synced to Wash's vocals on Black Box's hit songs, "Everybody Everybody" and "I Don't Know Anybody Else," distributed by RCA. Wash also received an undisclosed amount of money.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paula Abdul says she is no Milli Vanilli. She has launched a counterattack against charges that she wasn't the sole lead vocalist on her smash 1988 album, "Forever Your Girl." "Every time I hear one of these commentators comparing me to Milli Vanilli, I just want to reach into the television set and grab them and shake them," Abdul said in an interview this week. "It's not right and it's not fair. When they took the Grammy away from Milli Vanilli last year everybody knew they were a fraud.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A contract dispute between Geffen Records and Grammy winner Beck intensified this week as the company filed a breach of contract lawsuit against the singer after his threat to bolt the label. Beck, whose "Odelay" was named the best album of 1997 by the nation's pop critics, has told Geffen he will not honor his commitment to deliver up to four more albums to the label, according to the suit filed Monday in Los Angeles Superior Court.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Pop singer Toni Braxton has filed for bankruptcy protection in Los Angeles. Three companies owned by the Grammy-winning R & B artist also filed for Chapter 7 under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The move comes just eight weeks after Braxton filed a lawsuit against La Face Records and its parent company, Arista Records, seeking to terminate her recording contract.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | (Marla Matzer)
Singer Toni Braxton filed suit against La Face Records and its parent company, Arista Records, seeking to terminate her recording contract. The case, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, invokes a 50-year-old California law designed to protect movie actors from long-term studio deals. The so-called seven-year rule bars employers from enforcing personal-service contracts for more than seven years. By this measurement, the suit claims Braxton's contract should have expired in August 1996.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pop star George Michael's career rests on his next performance. One year after the singer filed suit to sever his contract with Sony Music Entertainment Ltd., his case comes to trial here Monday, with Michael as the first witness. While any superstar case attracts publicity, Michael's case against the United Kingdom unit of Sony Corp. is garnering particular attention because of the broader ramifications for the record business.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paula Abdul says she is no Milli Vanilli. She has launched a counterattack against charges that she wasn't the sole lead vocalist on her smash 1988 album, "Forever Your Girl." "Every time I hear one of these commentators comparing me to Milli Vanilli, I just want to reach into the television set and grab them and shake them," Abdul said in an interview this week. "It's not right and it's not fair. When they took the Grammy away from Milli Vanilli last year everybody knew they were a fraud.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | ALAN CITRON and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a thriller of a deal, pop icon Michael Jackson has signed a long-term contract with Sony Corp. that guarantees him an unprecedented share of the profits from his next six albums, his own record label, a role in developing video software products and a shot at movie stardom. The contract, the biggest ever awarded an entertainer, is expected to return hundreds of millions of dollars to Jackson.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A contract dispute between Geffen Records and Grammy winner Beck intensified this week as the company filed a breach of contract lawsuit against the singer after his threat to bolt the label. Beck, whose "Odelay" was named the best album of 1997 by the nation's pop critics, has told Geffen he will not honor his commitment to deliver up to four more albums to the label, according to the suit filed Monday in Los Angeles Superior Court.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2002 | Associated Press
Legislators turned to a parliamentary maneuver to resuscitate a bill that seeks to stop California's $41-billion recording industry from locking singers into contracts for long stretches of their careers. The Senate Judiciary Committee converted the bill, already three weeks past its legislative deadline to reach the Senate floor or die, into a special legislation device called a "spot" bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Martha Wash, the singer who says that hers is the real voice behind the pop groups Black Box, Seduction and C&C Music Factory, has signed an eight-year, eight-album contract with RCA. The contract was part of a settlement agreement between Wash and RCA, whom the singer sued after learning that a model lip-synced to Wash's vocals on Black Box's hit songs, "Everybody Everybody" and "I Don't Know Anybody Else," distributed by RCA. Wash also received an undisclosed amount of money.
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