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NEWS
September 30, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tiny Tim was hospitalized in serious but stable condition after suffering a heart attack on stage during a ukulele concert in Montague. The 64-year-old balladeer with a falsetto voice and long black hair was about to croon his first tune at the Uke Expo when he suddenly collapsed. "He just gets up on stage and he introduces the band, and then just out of nowhere . . . he just basically passed out.
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NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
The Kings of Leon stunned fans when the band canceled its entire U.S. tour after an unfortunate Dallas concert in which lead singer Caleb Followill abruptly left the stage saying "I'm going to go backstage and I'm going to vomit, I'm going to drink a beer... " While the band's official line is that Followill is suffering from vocal issues and exhaustion, band member and brother Jared Followill suggested there were deeper issues involved, tweeting on July 29, "Dallas, I cannot begin to tell you how sorry I am. There are internal sicknesses & problems that have needed to be addressed.
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NEWS
May 29, 1997 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rock legend Bob Dylan canceled a two-week European tour Wednesday after being hospitalized in New York for treatment of a respiratory infection, according to a statement released in London by the singer's representatives. The statement said that the 56-year-old singer-songwriter, who was hospitalized last weekend, is suffering from histoplasmosis, a fungal infection that creates a swelling of the sac that surrounds the heart. In severe cases that are left untreated, the disease can be fatal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An understudy replaced opera star Sylvie Valayre for the Sunday performance of Puccini's "Manon Lescaut" at the Orange County Performing Arts Center following her collapse onstage Saturday night. Valayre, who was stricken 75 minutes into the opera, was taken to a local hospital and released. She then flew back to Paris, said Kevin Crysler, marketing director for Opera Pacific, which stages opera at the arts center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An understudy replaced opera star Sylvie Valayre for the Sunday performance of Puccini's "Manon Lescaut" at the Orange County Performing Arts Center following her collapse onstage Saturday night. Valayre, who was stricken 75 minutes into the opera, was taken to a local hospital and released. She then flew back to Paris, said Kevin Crysler, marketing director for Opera Pacific, which stages opera at the arts center.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marilyn Horne travels with a complete medicine chest. Simon Estes gulps vitamins daily--at least 3,000 units of Vitamin C. Sherrill Milnes wears a scarf and rarely talks in the cold outdoors. Leigh Munro washes her hands often. Benjamin Luxon doesn't worry about his health and even spends time cutting wood on his farm. Opera singers sometimes take extraordinary precautions to avoid catching a cold or the flu. After all, that first sneeze can lead to a temporary loss of livelihood.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
The Kings of Leon stunned fans when the band canceled its entire U.S. tour after an unfortunate Dallas concert in which lead singer Caleb Followill abruptly left the stage saying "I'm going to go backstage and I'm going to vomit, I'm going to drink a beer... " While the band's official line is that Followill is suffering from vocal issues and exhaustion, band member and brother Jared Followill suggested there were deeper issues involved, tweeting on July 29, "Dallas, I cannot begin to tell you how sorry I am. There are internal sicknesses & problems that have needed to be addressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Corina Knoll
Emails written by Michael Jackson's longtime manager will be turned over to the attorneys involved in an ongoing wrongful death case filed by the pop singer's mother and his three children. A Pennsylvania attorney for the widow of manager Frank DiLeo said Thursday that he would turn over emails that could be relevant to the case, which accuses entertainment behemoth AEG of responsibility for the pop singer's death in 2009. The attorney, David Regoli, who spoke via telephone in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom, said he had made a copy of DiLeo's email inbox while he was doing work for the manager's estate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
About six weeks after Michael Jackson's death, an AEG executive told a producer for the “This Is It” documentary to delete footage of the singer looking too “skeletal.” Witnesses in the Jackson family's wrongful-death suit have testified that they were worried about the singer's health and dramatic weight loss in the day before his scheduled comeback tour and had expressed concerns to tour officials. The paramedic who came to Jackson's Holmby Hills home after the 911 call on June 25, 2009, testified that the singer was so emaciated that he thought Jackson was an end-stage cancer patient who had come home to die. FULL COVERAGE: AEG wrongful death trial “Make sure we take out the shots of MJ in that red leather jacket at the sound stage where the mini-movies were being filmed,” AEG Live president and co-chief executive Randy Phillips wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Ruben Vives, Victoria Kim, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
A Los Angeles jury on Wednesday found that concert promoter AEG Live was not liable for the death of Michael Jackson, capping a marathon civil trial that laid bare the troubled singer's health problems, struggles with drugs and fateful attempt at a comeback tour. The verdict came four years after Jackson received a fatal dose of an anesthetic from his doctor as he was about to launch a concert series produced by AEG aimed at reviving his stalled career. Jackson's family filed the lawsuit, claiming that AEG's was to blame for the King of Pop's death because it was negligent in the hiring and supervising of the doctor, Conrad Murray.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rock legend Bob Dylan canceled a two-week European tour Wednesday after being hospitalized in New York for treatment of a respiratory infection, according to a statement released in London by the singer's representatives. The statement said that the 56-year-old singer-songwriter, who was hospitalized last weekend, is suffering from histoplasmosis, a fungal infection that creates a swelling of the sac that surrounds the heart. In severe cases that are left untreated, the disease can be fatal.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tiny Tim was hospitalized in serious but stable condition after suffering a heart attack on stage during a ukulele concert in Montague. The 64-year-old balladeer with a falsetto voice and long black hair was about to croon his first tune at the Uke Expo when he suddenly collapsed. "He just gets up on stage and he introduces the band, and then just out of nowhere . . . he just basically passed out.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marilyn Horne travels with a complete medicine chest. Simon Estes gulps vitamins daily--at least 3,000 units of Vitamin C. Sherrill Milnes wears a scarf and rarely talks in the cold outdoors. Leigh Munro washes her hands often. Benjamin Luxon doesn't worry about his health and even spends time cutting wood on his farm. Opera singers sometimes take extraordinary precautions to avoid catching a cold or the flu. After all, that first sneeze can lead to a temporary loss of livelihood.
HEALTH
September 12, 2005 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
The days of the fat opera singer are waning. Opera has become an increasingly visual medium, because of the influence of television and film, and directors want singers to look the part, not just sing it. They now demand more physical prowess from performers -- a swordfight should resemble a swordfight, not a couple of guys vaguely lunging at each other. But singers who have jumped on the treadmill have discovered something else -- being fit makes them better singers.
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