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OPINION
November 6, 2012
Re "18th Street to death row," Nov. 3 Pedro Espinoza, the 23-year-old killer of Jamiel Shaw II, smirked at the victim's grieving father. Espinoza is unlikely to be put to death in California, so he'll almost surely spend at least 40 years in prison. He should think about all he'll never enjoy again: family gatherings, good food and drink, sleeping in a comfortable bed, the company of women, driving a car and anything else that brought pleasure in his former life as a free person.
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NATIONAL
November 18, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
George Zimmerman, whose battles with the law have captivated the nation for almost two years, was arrested again Monday in Florida on charges of domestic violence, including pointing a weapon at his girlfriend. Zimmerman, 30, was taken into custody in Apopka, Fla., where he and his girlfriend lived, and taken to the Seminole County jail, Florida officials said. He will spend the night in a 64-square-foot cell and will appear before a judge Tuesday afternoon, Chief Deputy Dennis Lemma said at a televised news conference.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A man convicted in the rape and murder of an 87-year-old woman in her El Monte home more than two decades ago was pronounced dead after he was found unresponsive in his death row cell, authorities said Monday. Mario Lewis Gray, 55, was found Saturday morning in his single cell at San Quentin State Prison, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said Monday. Gray was pronounced dead at the prison hospital. Gray was found guilty by a jury in the April 24, 1987, slaying of Ruby Reed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | Matt Hamilton
Heriberto Eddie Rodriguez was far from a model inmate. Two months after arriving at the Men's Central Jail, authorities say, the San Fernando Valley gang member beat and kicked his cellmate as he lay on the ground -- then forced him to sleep under the bed. Weeks later, he allegedly assaulted a new cellmate. The man was clasping at the cell's bars with blood dripping down his face when a sheriff's deputy arrived. He was begging for help. Rodriguez, who is 5 feet, 9 inches tall and weighs 165 pounds, stomped on a third cellmate who wouldn't give up his blanket, authorities say, and he was part of a group of prisoners who beat and choked another man who was in custody for a few days for driving on a suspended license.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
(Editor's note: Writer Mary MacVean tried out trainer Jackie Warner's diet plan from her new book “10 Pounds in 10 Days.” Here's her experience. Read about her previous days , too.) Day 5 I have to admit that being told what to do helps. Exactly, precisely what to do. Even if I don't always do it. So when every single cell in my body is pushing me toward the pastries someone brought to the office, I have an easy excuse. I'm following a plan. My normal M.O. is closer to, “Oh, I'll just have a little and make up for it later.” Choice.
SCIENCE
January 11, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Scientists reported Thursday that for the first time they have made human embryonic stem cells without destroying embryos, a development that the government's top stem cell official said would make the controversial research eligible for federal funding. Story Landis, who chairs the National Institute of Health's stem cell task force, said that with certain safeguards, the new method appeared to comply with federal restrictions that have largely cut scientists off from the $28 billion the government spends on medical research each year.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
George Zimmerman, whose battles with the law have captivated the nation for almost two years, was arrested again Monday in Florida on charges of domestic violence, including pointing a weapon at his girlfriend. Zimmerman, 30, was taken into custody in Apopka, Fla., where he and his girlfriend lived, and taken to the Seminole County jail, Florida officials said. He will spend the night in a 64-square-foot cell and will appear before a judge Tuesday afternoon, Chief Deputy Dennis Lemma said at a televised news conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2012 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to The Times
The human body begins as a single cell that proliferates into a few identical daughter cells which ultimately grow into billions of specialized body cells. Scientists and physicians have long recognized the pattern of this process, called differentiation, but how it works was a mystery. Then in the early 1950s, an Italian developmental biologist transplanted to the United States, Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini, provided the first clue. Levi-Montalcini and her colleague, American biochemist Stanley Cohen, identified and ultimately isolated and purified nerve growth factor, a hormone that tells growing nerve cells where to go. The discovery was a seminal development in the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate cell and organ growth and established an entirely new field of biological study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | Matt Hamilton
Heriberto Eddie Rodriguez was far from a model inmate. Two months after arriving at the Men's Central Jail, authorities say, the San Fernando Valley gang member beat and kicked his cellmate as he lay on the ground -- then forced him to sleep under the bed. Weeks later, he allegedly assaulted a new cellmate. The man was clasping at the cell's bars with blood dripping down his face when a sheriff's deputy arrived. He was begging for help. Rodriguez, who is 5 feet, 9 inches tall and weighs 165 pounds, stomped on a third cellmate who wouldn't give up his blanket, authorities say, and he was part of a group of prisoners who beat and choked another man who was in custody for a few days for driving on a suspended license.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A month into investigating a fire that broke out on Boeing Co.'s grounded 787 Dreamliner passenger jets, the National Transportation Safety Board said it found a short-circuit in one of the aircraft's lithium ion batteries and even traced it to a specific cell, but still doesn't have a cause. Speaking to reporters Thursday from Washington, NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said the agency hasn't reached a conclusion on the cause of the fire that occurred in Boston on Jan. 7. But investigators have been “working around the clock to learn about what happened and why.” The lithium-ion battery system on the 787 is a cluster of eight individual cells packaged together in one box. Hersman said that all mechanical damage to the cells and the battery case occurred after the short-circuiting in Cell No. 6. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The battery then experienced “thermal runaway,” a chain reaction in which heat spreads rapidly from cell to cell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A man convicted in the rape and murder of an 87-year-old woman in her El Monte home more than two decades ago was pronounced dead after he was found unresponsive in his death row cell, authorities said Monday. Mario Lewis Gray, 55, was found Saturday morning in his single cell at San Quentin State Prison, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said Monday. Gray was pronounced dead at the prison hospital. Gray was found guilty by a jury in the April 24, 1987, slaying of Ruby Reed.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Though a month of investigating the grounded Boeing Co. Dreamliner 787 passenger jet and its fire-prone batteries has turned up clues, federal officials reported that the cause of the problem remains a mystery. Meanwhile, airlines have made other arrangements for passengers for the foreseeable future as its 787s are grounded and the battery issue is investigated. Speaking to reporters Thursday from Washington, National Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said investigators found a short-circuit in a lithium-ion battery on one aircraft and even traced it to a specific cell, but they didn't yet determine the root cause.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A month into investigating a fire that broke out on Boeing Co.'s grounded 787 Dreamliner passenger jets, the National Transportation Safety Board said it found a short-circuit in one of the aircraft's lithium ion batteries and even traced it to a specific cell, but still doesn't have a cause. Speaking to reporters Thursday from Washington, NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said the agency hasn't reached a conclusion on the cause of the fire that occurred in Boston on Jan. 7. But investigators have been “working around the clock to learn about what happened and why.” The lithium-ion battery system on the 787 is a cluster of eight individual cells packaged together in one box. Hersman said that all mechanical damage to the cells and the battery case occurred after the short-circuiting in Cell No. 6. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The battery then experienced “thermal runaway,” a chain reaction in which heat spreads rapidly from cell to cell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2012 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to The Times
The human body begins as a single cell that proliferates into a few identical daughter cells which ultimately grow into billions of specialized body cells. Scientists and physicians have long recognized the pattern of this process, called differentiation, but how it works was a mystery. Then in the early 1950s, an Italian developmental biologist transplanted to the United States, Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini, provided the first clue. Levi-Montalcini and her colleague, American biochemist Stanley Cohen, identified and ultimately isolated and purified nerve growth factor, a hormone that tells growing nerve cells where to go. The discovery was a seminal development in the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate cell and organ growth and established an entirely new field of biological study.
OPINION
November 6, 2012
Re "18th Street to death row," Nov. 3 Pedro Espinoza, the 23-year-old killer of Jamiel Shaw II, smirked at the victim's grieving father. Espinoza is unlikely to be put to death in California, so he'll almost surely spend at least 40 years in prison. He should think about all he'll never enjoy again: family gatherings, good food and drink, sleeping in a comfortable bed, the company of women, driving a car and anything else that brought pleasure in his former life as a free person.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
(Editor's note: Writer Mary MacVean tried out trainer Jackie Warner's diet plan from her new book “10 Pounds in 10 Days.” Here's her experience. Read about her previous days , too.) Day 5 I have to admit that being told what to do helps. Exactly, precisely what to do. Even if I don't always do it. So when every single cell in my body is pushing me toward the pastries someone brought to the office, I have an easy excuse. I'm following a plan. My normal M.O. is closer to, “Oh, I'll just have a little and make up for it later.” Choice.
SCIENCE
March 30, 2006 | By Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
Smart children have a different rhythm in their heads — a seesaw pattern of growth that lags years behind other young people — say government scientists who mapped the brains of hundreds of children. Seeking a link between neural anatomy and mental ability, researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health and McGill University in Montreal discovered it where they least expected — not in sheer brain size or special structures, but in the patterns of childhood growth. Brain development in children with the highest IQ peaked four years later than among average children, the researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Though a month of investigating the grounded Boeing Co. Dreamliner 787 passenger jet and its fire-prone batteries has turned up clues, federal officials reported that the cause of the problem remains a mystery. Meanwhile, airlines have made other arrangements for passengers for the foreseeable future as its 787s are grounded and the battery issue is investigated. Speaking to reporters Thursday from Washington, National Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said investigators found a short-circuit in a lithium-ion battery on one aircraft and even traced it to a specific cell, but they didn't yet determine the root cause.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
  A liquid biopsy? That’s what developers are calling a new blood test for cancer that’s been getting a lot of buzz lately. The test appears to be hypersensitive to even a single cell of cancer in the body. This video from KDAF-TV explains why this blood test would be a breakthrough in monitoring the spread of cancer in patients who have been diagnosed. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital are working with corporate partner Johnson & Johnson to develop this test.
SCIENCE
January 11, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Scientists reported Thursday that for the first time they have made human embryonic stem cells without destroying embryos, a development that the government's top stem cell official said would make the controversial research eligible for federal funding. Story Landis, who chairs the National Institute of Health's stem cell task force, said that with certain safeguards, the new method appeared to comply with federal restrictions that have largely cut scientists off from the $28 billion the government spends on medical research each year.
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