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Single Gender Schools

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Speaking at the new Single Gender Academies here Wednesday, Gov. Pete Wilson announced plans to double the number of same-sex schools to 24 statewide. Wilson said he has earmarked $5 million in his 1998-99 budget proposal to open more single-gender schools and support those already operating. That would match the amount allocated for the program this school year. "In the budget for next year, we're going to build upon what is clearly working in Fountain Valley," Wilson said.
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NATIONAL
December 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Auburn refused to block Wells College's plans to allow men to enroll next year for the first time in its 136-year history, saying the survival of the institution was at stake. Two students had challenged the school's decision to go coed, alleging fraud and breach of contract, but Acting State Supreme Court Justice Peter Corning said they failed to prove their arguments in seeking an injunction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000
Education is always high on the nation's agenda, but how best to make it work is receiving renewed attention nationwide. Candidates make improved education the most prominent of their promises. Teachers, administrators and theorists look for the best ways to help students learn. Amid great hoopla several years ago, Gov. Pete Wilson took a page from the book of private schools and announced a new experiment in public education: single-sex schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2002 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they sit separated by a hallway, the boys and girls of Jefferson Leadership Academies in Long Beach don't cite research to explain why they concentrate, learn and behave. And they don't care whether their public middle school violates federal law. Something about their school is working, they say. And if they took classes together, it wouldn't. "You can ask your teacher something girlie, and you don't have to worry about boys saying something cruel," seventh-grader Kiona Jones said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of the state's few experiments in single-gender public education, the concept may get its truest test in the first two such schools to open in Southern California--in an Orange County office park. Other all-boy and all-girl public schools launched this year in California serve mainstream students on or next to mainstream, coeducational campuses. The Single Gender Academies, which opened in Fountain Valley on Dec. 1, cater to students who have left traditional education altogether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of the state's few experiments in single-gender public education, the concept may get its truest test in the first two such schools to open in Southern California--in an Orange County office park. Other all-boy and all-girl public schools launched this year in California serve mainstream students on or next to mainstream, coeducational campuses. The Single Gender Academies, which opened in Fountain Valley on Dec. 1, cater to students who have left traditional education altogether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The girls and boys who go to public school in an office park here sit at the same desks, type at the same computers and learn from the same teachers. They split everything evenly down to the last No. 2 pencil. The only thing the two groups don't share in Southern California's first state-funded, single-sex schools is class time together. That's fine with them. "You get more concentration on your work," said Manuel Ponce, 16, of Santa Ana. "When there's girls, they flirt and stuff like that."
NATIONAL
December 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Auburn refused to block Wells College's plans to allow men to enroll next year for the first time in its 136-year history, saying the survival of the institution was at stake. Two students had challenged the school's decision to go coed, alleging fraud and breach of contract, but Acting State Supreme Court Justice Peter Corning said they failed to prove their arguments in seeking an injunction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2002 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they sit separated by a hallway, the boys and girls of Jefferson Leadership Academies in Long Beach don't cite research to explain why they concentrate, learn and behave. And they don't care whether their public middle school violates federal law. Something about their school is working, they say. And if they took classes together, it wouldn't. "You can ask your teacher something girlie, and you don't have to worry about boys saying something cruel," seventh-grader Kiona Jones said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1995
In a move aimed at bolstering parochial school enrollment, officials of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles have announced plans to consolidate four of their secondary schools. Officials announced the opening of two all-girls' campuses in the Southeast area, one at the site of Pius X High School in Downey and another at the site of Regina Caeli school in Compton. Beginning in September, students attending St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000
Education is always high on the nation's agenda, but how best to make it work is receiving renewed attention nationwide. Candidates make improved education the most prominent of their promises. Teachers, administrators and theorists look for the best ways to help students learn. Amid great hoopla several years ago, Gov. Pete Wilson took a page from the book of private schools and announced a new experiment in public education: single-sex schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Speaking at the new Single Gender Academies here Wednesday, Gov. Pete Wilson announced plans to double the number of same-sex schools to 24 statewide. Wilson said he has earmarked $5 million in his 1998-99 budget proposal to open more single-gender schools and support those already operating. That would match the amount allocated for the program this school year. "In the budget for next year, we're going to build upon what is clearly working in Fountain Valley," Wilson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of the state's few experiments in single-gender public education, the concept may get its truest test in the first two such schools to open in Southern California--in an Orange County office park. Other all-boy and all-girl public schools launched this year in California serve mainstream students on or next to mainstream, coeducational campuses. The Single Gender Academies, which opened in Fountain Valley on Dec. 1, cater to students who have left traditional education altogether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of the state's few experiments in single-gender public education, the concept may get its truest test in the first two such schools to open in Southern California--in an Orange County office park. Other all-boy and all-girl public schools launched this year in California serve mainstream students on or next to mainstream, coeducational campuses. The Single Gender Academies, which opened in Fountain Valley on Dec. 1, cater to students who have left traditional education altogether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The girls and boys who go to public school in an office park here sit at the same desks, type at the same computers and learn from the same teachers. They split everything evenly down to the last No. 2 pencil. The only thing the two groups don't share in Southern California's first state-funded, single-sex schools is class time together. That's fine with them. "You get more concentration on your work," said Manuel Ponce, 16, of Santa Ana. "When there's girls, they flirt and stuff like that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998
California's small experiment with public single-gender academies recognizes that children learn in different ways. Expanding the number of same-sex classes, as Gov. Wilson has proposed, would allow more students to participate on a strictly voluntary basis in an environment that some girls and some boys may find most conducive to learning. Research indicates that some girls do better, particularly in math and science, in classes by themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1993
Pledging to maintain the Roman Catholic Church's commitment to South-Central Los Angeles and surrounding communities, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony on Friday announced a two-year, $10-million program to revitalize three Catholic high schools. The schools are the only remaining single-gender high schools in South-Central Los Angeles and Compton. They are Verbum Dei Boys High School in Watts, Regina Caeli Girls High School in Compton and St.
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