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April 19, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since the advent of the Nuclear Age, a large number of targets in the former Communist world are being deleted from the U.S. nuclear war plan following a two-year, top-secret Pentagon review, according to U.S. sources. The reductions--well over 1,000 and perhaps more than 2,000--represent about 20% or more of the total group of about 8,500 Soviet Bloc targets that were to be struck by about 12,000 U.S.
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NEWS
April 19, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since the advent of the Nuclear Age, a large number of targets in the former Communist world are being deleted from the U.S. nuclear war plan following a two-year, top-secret Pentagon review, according to U.S. sources. The reductions--well over 1,000 and perhaps more than 2,000--represent about 20% or more of the total group of about 8,500 Soviet Bloc targets that were to be struck by about 12,000 U.S.
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NEWS
December 30, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A seemingly straightforward dispute between the United States and Soviet Union over how many cruise missiles a bomber can carry has emerged as the greatest remaining obstacle to a Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty that would cut offensive nuclear weapons by about half. The issue will be the first order of business when Secretary of State James A. Baker III flies to Moscow in a few weeks. It will be very difficult to resolve because it cuts to the heart of U.S. nuclear war plans.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
In 1957, just before Sputnik, two alarmed emissaries from President Dwight D. Eisenhower visited U.S. Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command, in Omaha. Their calculations, they said, showed that virtually none of SAC's bombers could escape a surprise Soviet air attack, even with the several hours of warning time that then was expected. "You're right," LeMay agreed.
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