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Single Life

ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Morris Bobrow's musical-comedy revue about single life, "Party of One," at the Century City Playhouse, features five beautiful voices (Valerie Doran, Jennie Fahn, Jason Heil, Joe Symon and Melanie Wingert) in nice harmonies, but lacks the slinky sexiness or the great physical comedy that would give it some much-needed pizazz.
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NEWS
April 25, 1996 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
The stories in this first collection by Elizabeth Tippens are like half-fledged birds. Awkwardness and a fleck of shell are still on them, but also more than a promise of flight; and the reassurance that in writing, as in nature, spring comes regularly around with old songs in a refreshment of new voices. The nine jump-cut segments of "Winging It" present Faith: successively 27, 28, 29 and 30, single in the big city, and struggling to be an actress. She is variously involved with rich, sexy, middle-aged Lenny who will never marry her; poor, loving, poetical Sandy who desperately wants to; and cheerfully appreciative James, who will.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1995 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The whole thing started with red nail polish. I was sitting at home, newly and unexpectedly single, wondering if the baby was going to sleep through the night, and suddenly, completely and overpoweringly consumed with nail polish. I hadn't done my nails in years. Fingers or toes. I didn't even have any polish in the house. I searched the bathroom again and again, like a drunk pawing desperately for a bottle of Nyquil. That vintage red. It had to be here somewhere. I had to get those nails done.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the surface, Tara appears to have it all. The 31-year-old professional model travels the United States, appearing in catalogues and Sunday advertising supplements. She owns her home and lives a glamorous life that many would envy. "Friends and acquaintances think I'm independent, successful and don't need anyone," said Tara, who asked that her last name not be used. "But the truth is, I'm not that happy being alone.
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life is good, said Michael, 28, who was eating alone and reading a book at a Costa Mesa coffee shop. A good job. A new car. An apartment in Newport Beach. A devoted cat. No wife or ex-wife. Enough girlfriends, but none of the serious kind, he said. Marriage can wait, maybe forever. Michael is one of the estimated 838,000 single adults in Orange County, a group that is close to constituting half the total adult population. Two-thirds are white and not yet 40 years old.
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I'm just your basic single chick. My married friends suspect this means sex-packed nights and cereal dinners. But by the looks of Jerry Seinfeld's TV kitchen, I'm not the only one who eats Shredded Wheat for supper. And nobody thinks Jerry's a lazy slob, right? We are simply among a silent majority of people who eat way differently when alone. When we're with company, we feel compelled to eat meals as if we're dressing up.
NEWS
June 19, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Klein had always planned to retire from his construction job at 55, sell the house in Dana Point and spend his golden years tooling around Arizona in a mobile home. But just two years away from his target date, Klein's plans went up in smoke. In April of 1991, his ex-wife died, leaving the burden of raising their then-21-month-old grandson, Kevin, squarely on Klein's shoulders.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Once, being a never-married bachelor entering middle age was considered to be a pretty good gig. There were romantic role models: the sophisticated Henry Higgins, the dashing James Bond. That all-time good guy, Superman. Lifelong bachelors, at 40, were considered rugged individualists, urbane, worldly, self-aware, blissfully free, with unlimited options. They were even objects of envy.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Leanna Wolfe moved to Los Angeles from Berkeley seven years ago, she noticed some strange rituals practiced by single women. "People would take workshops to have elaborate strategies to be pleasing to (men)," she recalled. "That was very odd to me." So odd that the Hollywood Hills social anthropologist decided to write about it. She spent five years researching her book, "Women Who May Never Marry."
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In silent procession, the royal couple will enter a sanctuary on the Imperial Palace grounds housing Amaterasu, the sacred sun goddess of Japan and mythical matriarch of the 2,600-year-old Royal Family. There, in a dimly lit chamber, witnessed by only one attendant, the Chief Ritualist, the Crown Prince of Japan will read a matrimonial pledge. "I have come before you with the Crown Princess to pledge we will vow unchanging love," he will say, adding a plea for protection.
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