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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
The saxophone has been, almost from the music's earliest years, one of the primary voices of jazz. From Johnny Hodges and Sidney Bechet, Charlie Parker, Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane, the instrument has virtually defined jazz for many listeners. And, in the new millennium, it continues to be heard in an amazing number of styles and settings.
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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | EVAN CUMMINGS
Living the single life can be expensive. Food, shelter, clothing, taxes, insurance, even pleasurable pastimes--vacations and entertainment--cost more when you're alone. But you don't have to wait for Mr. or Ms. Right--or earn a six-figure salary--to build a firm financial base, says Victoria Felton-Collins, a certified financial planner. As a partner of Felton-Collins, Woodhouse & Associates in Costa Mesa, she regularly advises people from all income levels.
NEWS
December 19, 2002
A classic column ("Yes, Virginia, You Must Believe," Dec. 12). And you're single why? Or maybe you're not and that's just your marital status de plume. Bob Colleary Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2010 | By Roger Moore
Of all the acclaim that's come to Colin Firth's depiction of hidden grief in "A Single Man," precious little of it has focused on the physical Firth. At 49, the Golden Globe nominee looks 10 years younger and as fit as he was in those glory days as Mr. Darcy on TV's "Pride and Prejudice." "I pick up the script, and it says 'Naked man lies on bed.' And then a few pages in, 'Naked man jumps in ocean,' " Firth recalls. " 'Well,' I thought. 'It's time. One more push against gravity before I turn 50 and it's all downhill.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2005 | Steve Hochman
Wilco "Kicking Television: Live in Chicago" (Nonesuch) * * * 1/2 IT'S funny when Wilco leader Jeff Tweedy sings the musical question, "Do you still like rock 'n' roll?" in "Misunderstood," which opens this in-concert collection -- and the fans respond with a rousing, affirmative cheer. Wilco arguably abandoned rock 'n' roll and, for that matter, alt-country, back in 1996 when it first recorded that song.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a recent conversation, bassist Ron Carter promised that his nonet was going to be something special. And he was right. His opening set Tuesday night at Catalina Bar & Grill offered perfect testimony to the fact that innovation and adventure still exist in jazz, at a time when the music is passing through a period of distinct retrospection. A group consisting of four cellos, two basses, piano, drums and percussion is, on the face of it, an unusual instrumentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1988 | CRAIG LEE
For more than a decade, England's Siouxsie & the Banshees have portrayed a dark, phantasmagorical world filled with a dreamy sensuality and a sense of dark foreboding. Friday night at the Universal Amphitheatre, the group brought an elaborate stage show that resembled a cross between a German Expressionist, "Blue Angel"-type cabaret and a post-atomic shindig, marking the first time the quintet has delivered a theatrical performance befitting it's idiosyncratic vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's reason to celebrate this season. The stock market's up, the Angels have won more often than they've lost, and saxophonist Bennie Wallace is making local appearances again. Wallace, among the most singular and enthusiastic tenor players on the planet, has forgone live performances in all but Europe and New York City in recent years. Instead he's been concentrating on his writing and film score work while living in Pacific Palisades.
NEWS
September 15, 2001 | JANET WILSON and JOE MOZINGO and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Gamboas aren't waiting for his body, not that they really expect it to turn up. And though they're Roman Catholic, they're not having a funeral for Ronald, a Hollywood Hills resident who died alongside his partner and their 3-year-old adopted son aboard the United Airlines jet that crashed into the World Trade Center. Instead, family and friends gathered Friday night in his hometown outside Louisville, Ky., for a memorial service at his alma mater, Trinity High School.
SPORTS
February 15, 2002
If Wednesday's training runs are any indication, the United States will be in the medal chase with both its luge doubles teams today. The teams of Mark Grimmette and Brian Martin and Chris Thorpe and Clay Ives turned in some of the top times at Utah Olympic Park. Grimmette and Martin, bronze medalists at the Nagano Games, were the fastest on the first run at 43.217 seconds and second-fastest in the second run at 43.313. Thorpe and Ives were fastest starters both times, with the day's best 3.
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