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WORLD
March 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
British lawmakers Thursday eliminated Sinn Fein's right to claim $750,000 in parliamentary expenses, a move designed to punish the Irish Republican Army-linked party for recent alleged IRA crimes. Sinn Fein said the move was "undemocratic" and a political attack on its constituents. After several hours of debate, lawmakers from all major parties in the House of Commons agreed to prevent Sinn Fein's four elected members from claiming office, staff and travel expenses for the next year.
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WORLD
April 8, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In Britain and around the world, supporters of the late Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher celebrated her legacy Monday. Even some of her sharpest critics said she defined an era in British public life -- if not always for the right reasons. Among those who have already offered their reflections are President Obama, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, the African National Congress of South Africa and Sinn Fein of Northern Ireland. Here are more thoughts from world leaders, political activists and other figures: British Prime Minister David Cameron: “As our first woman prime minister, Margaret Thatcher succeeded against all the odds, and the real thing about Margaret Thatcher is that she didn't just lead our country, she saved our country.
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WORLD
February 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain will impose financial penalties worth hundreds of thousands of dollars on Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army-linked party, for the IRA's alleged robbery of a Belfast bank and other crimes in Northern Ireland, the government said. Northern Ireland Secretary Paul Murphy said Sinn Fein's four elected members of the House of Commons would lose their right to claim expenses, a benefit worth more than $750,000 annually.
WORLD
April 13, 2009 | Associated Press
Irish Republican Army dissidents on Sunday threatened to kill top Sinn Fein politician Martin McGuinness and resume attacks in England as part of their efforts to wreck the IRA cease-fire and power sharing in Northern Ireland. An Easter statement from the outlawed Real IRA sent to Irish news media branded McGuinness a traitor because he holds the top Irish Catholic post in Northern Ireland's government, sharing power with British Protestants.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
British and Irish leaders anguished over whether to eject the IRA-allied Sinn Fein party from Northern Ireland peace talks after two killings blamed on the Irish Republican Army. Britain's Northern Ireland secretary urged that Sinn Fein be barred from the talks as punishment. Sinn Fein argues that it is totally separate from the IRA and that it has no link to violence--despite the fact that Britain says they are Siamese twins.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Protestant leader charged with forming Northern Ireland's new government said he has invited the senior Sinn Fein leaders to urgent talks, the first time he's done so. Although Ulster Unionist Party leader David Trimble began talking with Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams six months ago, until now such contact has always been at the behest of the IRA-allied party. Trimble's invitation comes as the deadline set by the British government approaches to hand back power to local politicians.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Sinn Fein will rejoin Northern Ireland peace talks despite reservations about where they are headed, leaders of the IRA-allied party announced. The Protestant leader of Northern Ireland's largest party, the Ulster Unionists, urged his supporters to stick with the negotiations. David Trimble said the talks would ensure Northern Ireland's continued union with Britain.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Resisting pressure from other parties, Sinn Fein negotiators formally rejected a compromise plan Tuesday that would allow Northern Ireland's long-delayed government to be formed in exchange for an IRA concession on arms. The Irish Republican Army-linked party made the announcement after all eight parties that backed last year's Good Friday peace accord gathered to discuss the plan proposed by the British and Irish prime ministers.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The political wing of the Irish Republican Army has declared an end to violence in its battle against British rule in Northern Ireland. The Sinn Fein statement came as the British government unveiled plans for a crackdown on guerrilla splinter groups still resisting a peace drive in British-ruled Northern Ireland, where sectarian foes reached a landmark accord in April. "Sinn Fein believe the violence we have seen must be for all of us now a thing of the past," Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams said.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Irish Prime Minister Bertie Ahern met with the leader of the Irish Republican Army's political wing in Dublin, marking the restart of direct contacts after a new IRA cease-fire in British-ruled Northern Ireland. Ahern, Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams and moderate nationalist leader John Hume jointly urged Northern Ireland's pro-British unionists to back a struggling talks initiative aimed at ending their decades of strife with Irish nationalist republicans.
WORLD
December 9, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Northern Irish paramilitary killer Michael Stone was sentenced to 16 years in prison for trying to kill Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams and storming into Belfast's parliament building with homemade explosives. Stone, who supports British rule and made a fatal attack on an Irish Republican Army funeral nearly 20 years ago, entered the Stormont building in November 2006 armed with nail bombs, a hatchet, knives and an imitation gun. He threw a bomb containing a gas canister, but it failed to explode.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Brian Keenan, a commanding figure during the Irish Republican Army's long march from war to peace, died of cancer Wednesday, the Sinn Fein party announced in Dublin. He was 66. Keenan built up the IRA's weapons arsenal in the 1970s, directed its bombing campaign in England and served on the IRA's ruling army council for a decade, casting votes to break and call cease-fires in the 1990s. Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams lauded Keenan as a key persuader atop the IRA command who understood the need to move into politics.
WORLD
April 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A brother-in-law of Martin McGuinness, the Sinn Fein deputy leader supposed to oversee a new power-sharing government of Northern Ireland, was charged with kidnapping and assaulting a couple in an IRA-style operation. Marvin Canning, 45, gave a clenched-fist salute to cheering supporters outside Londonderry Magistrates Court shortly before he was arraigned on seven criminal counts in Monday's abduction of the couple in the Irish Republic.
WORLD
March 27, 2007 | William Graham and Kim Murphy, Special to The Times
The leaders of two parties whose conflict helped fuel decades of violence in Northern Ireland held direct talks for the first time Monday and agreed to enter a power-sharing government on May 8. The meeting marked what many here hope will be the end of the strife that claimed 3,700 lives over three decades. It also set the stage for the Rev. Ian Paisley, the 80-year-old standard-bearer of pro-British unionism in Northern Ireland, to become the province's first minister within six weeks.
OPINION
February 3, 2007
Re "Are its Troubles over?" editorial, Jan. 30 This editorial states that the police in Northern Ireland "arrested and killed many Roman Catholics over the decades in which they fought for Northern Ireland's independence from Britain." In fact, during the period of "the Troubles" from 1969 to 1998, the Royal Ulster Constabulary was responsible for 55 deaths. Over the same period, the Irish Republican Army killed more than 1,700 people. The IRA killed more Roman Catholics than the constabulary and British army combined.
OPINION
January 30, 2007
IN A ONCE-UNTHINKABLE concession, the political wing of the Irish Republican Army voted Sunday to recognize the authority of the new Police Service of Northern Ireland. Meeting in Dublin, Sinn Fein pledged cooperation with the new force only days after revelations that the province's previous police force, the Royal Ulster Constabulary, coddled Protestant killers as recently as the 1990s.
WORLD
April 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A brother-in-law of Martin McGuinness, the Sinn Fein deputy leader supposed to oversee a new power-sharing government of Northern Ireland, was charged with kidnapping and assaulting a couple in an IRA-style operation. Marvin Canning, 45, gave a clenched-fist salute to cheering supporters outside Londonderry Magistrates Court shortly before he was arraigned on seven criminal counts in Monday's abduction of the couple in the Irish Republic.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
IRA-allied Sinn Fein representatives should rejoin Northern Ireland's peace talks, Prime Minister Tony Blair said, adding that other negotiators were already "agonizingly close" to a settlement without them. Blair spoke after meeting Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams in London. Adams said he favored returning "as soon as possible," but he added that he must consult with Sinn Fein's Executive Committee next week.
WORLD
January 29, 2007 | William Graham, Special to The Times
Sinn Fein members voted overwhelmingly Sunday to take the historic step of endorsing a reformed police force in Northern Ireland, a key action on the path of establishing a power-sharing arrangement in the British province.
OPINION
January 5, 2007
Re "Sinn Fein move could spell N. Irish progress," Dec. 29 Although I enjoyed the article on the progress in Northern Ireland, it was apparent that The Times' tendency to present facts in unusual ways persists to this day. The Times states that Northern Ireland's republicans "fought for years for independence from Britain and suffered years of arrests and killings at the hands of the police." I hope that none of the still-grieving relatives of police officers in Northern Ireland, regularly murdered with a short-range shot in the dark of the night, explosives strapped to the underside of their cars or by a sniper while on patrol in the streets, read this.
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