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July 20, 1989 | ART PINE and LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writers
Assistant Chief Orville Thiele, a husky, red-haired 25-year veteran of the Sioux City, Iowa, fire department, was at the console at 3:40 p.m. Wednesday when the Woodbury County communications center radioed that a crippled DC-10 airliner was about to crash land. Thiele was stunned, but not unprepared.
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NEWS
October 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A paid hunt for wreckage from the July 19 crash of United Airlines Flight 232 near Sioux City, Iowa, was declared over for the year so that farmers could return to the fields. Fragments of the DC-10 engine's fan blade and bearings were found on the Edward Anderson farm near Alta, Iowa, and the landowners will divide a $1,000 reward with the treasure hunter who found them. General Electric said it had hired searchers from Missouri, Nebraska, Minnesota and Iowa to look for clues to the crash.
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NEWS
July 27, 1989 | From United Press International
A crippled jetliner made an emergency landing Wednesday at Sioux Gateway Airport without injury or major damage, exactly a week after the crippled United Airlines Flight 232 crash-landed at the facility, killing 111 of the 296 people aboard. Northwest Flight 2645, a twin-engine British Aerospace Jet-stream 31 carrying 14 passengers, lost oil pressure and power in its left engine about a half-hour after taking off from Minneapolis en route to Sioux City.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
About 40,000 people turned out in Sioux City, Iowa, to honor flight and ground crews who brought in a disabled jumbo jet to the Sioux Gateway Airport and the emergency workers who helped rescue passengers. "This is unbelievable," said Capt. Alfred C. Haynes, pilot of United Flight 232. "It's like a continuation of everything they did July 19," the day the DC-10 tumbled down the runway in an emergency landing, a crash in which 112 died but 184 survived.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Investigators continued to use infrared cameras Sunday to search cornfields for pieces of a shattered jet engine from a DC-10 that crashed, and prayers for the 110 people killed were offered during church services.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
About 40,000 people turned out in Sioux City, Iowa, to honor flight and ground crews who brought in a disabled jumbo jet to the Sioux Gateway Airport and the emergency workers who helped rescue passengers. "This is unbelievable," said Capt. Alfred C. Haynes, pilot of United Flight 232. "It's like a continuation of everything they did July 19," the day the DC-10 tumbled down the runway in an emergency landing, a crash in which 112 died but 184 survived.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A paid hunt for wreckage from the July 19 crash of United Airlines Flight 232 near Sioux City, Iowa, was declared over for the year so that farmers could return to the fields. Fragments of the DC-10 engine's fan blade and bearings were found on the Edward Anderson farm near Alta, Iowa, and the landowners will divide a $1,000 reward with the treasure hunter who found them. General Electric said it had hired searchers from Missouri, Nebraska, Minnesota and Iowa to look for clues to the crash.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | From United Press International
A crippled jetliner made an emergency landing Wednesday at Sioux Gateway Airport without injury or major damage, exactly a week after the crippled United Airlines Flight 232 crash-landed at the facility, killing 111 of the 296 people aboard. Northwest Flight 2645, a twin-engine British Aerospace Jet-stream 31 carrying 14 passengers, lost oil pressure and power in its left engine about a half-hour after taking off from Minneapolis en route to Sioux City.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Investigators continued to use infrared cameras Sunday to search cornfields for pieces of a shattered jet engine from a DC-10 that crashed, and prayers for the 110 people killed were offered during church services.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | ART PINE and LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writers
Assistant Chief Orville Thiele, a husky, red-haired 25-year veteran of the Sioux City, Iowa, fire department, was at the console at 3:40 p.m. Wednesday when the Woodbury County communications center radioed that a crippled DC-10 airliner was about to crash land. Thiele was stunned, but not unprepared.
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