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July 13, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody knows her birth name. Zintkala Nuni, the Lakota call her. Lost Bird. Today, she is lost no more. A century after the infant was discovered alive, lying beneath her mother's body on the killing fields of Wounded Knee, her remains have been brought home. In a traditional ceremony, Lost Bird was interred Thursday, near the mass grave where 200 slain Native Americans, including her mother, were unceremoniously buried Jan. 3, 1891.
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SPORTS
February 28, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
The mystery sweeps across these desolate grasslands like a cold, haunting wind. For nearly 70 years, it has been a consistent drumbeat of cluttered life in the biggest village on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The streets here have no names. The houses have no numbers. Some residents use faded blankets for window panes, splintered outhouses for relief.
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SPORTS
February 28, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
The mystery sweeps across these desolate grasslands like a cold, haunting wind. For nearly 70 years, it has been a consistent drumbeat of cluttered life in the biggest village on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The streets here have no names. The houses have no numbers. Some residents use faded blankets for window panes, splintered outhouses for relief.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The body of Long Wolf, a Sioux chief who died 105 years ago in London while traveling with Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, was buried atop a wind-swept hill in Wolf Creek, S.D., his ancestral land. "I'm very glad my grandfather is home. I feel very good now," said Jessie Black Feather, 87, Long Wolf's closest living descendant. Long Wolf died of pneumonia in London in 1892.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | Associated Press
A delegation of South Dakota Sioux Indians prayed on the lawn of a downtown Baghdad hotel and said they will offer their sacred peace pipe to the Iraqi president. "When President Saddam Hussein has prayed for peace, the Teton will return to the land of their ancestors and ask President Bush to pray for peace also," Arvol Looking Horse said Sunday. He led a seven-member delegation representing the elders of the traditional Teton Sioux tribes on a visit at the invitation of the Iraqi government.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire reports
Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and Kris Kristofferson held a concert with Indian performers aimed at bringing Indians and whites closer together. Sunday's Concert for Reconciliation stemmed from Gov. George Mickelson's declaration of 1990 as Year of Reconciliation between whites and Indians. Between 150 and 400 Indian men, women and children were killed Dec. 29, 1890, by cavalry gunfire at Wounded Knee.
NEWS
August 5, 1990
"A Bridge Between Two Worlds" (June 17) is a commendable account of Jack West, the person chosen to head the new American Indian Museum planned to be built in Washington D.C. Mr. West has an amazingly strong background, and I admire his strength and endurance as an attorney who defends Indian issues in Washington. Being half Indian and half Anglo, he has the ability to bridge both worlds. I find the fact that the museum will be called "American Indian Museum" has a demeaning effect.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of American Indians arrived on foot and horseback at this massacre site to commemorate the 100th anniversary Saturday of one of the saddest days in their history. About 100 horseback riders and another 100 people watched as Indians conducted a spiritual ceremony in sub-freezing temperatures Saturday morning at the grave site of Sioux Indians killed by U.S. soldiers a century ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1988 | DOUG BROWN, Times Staff Writer
Sioux leaders chose a 59-year-old Newport Beach man Thursday to be their first war chief in more than a century and lead the battle to recover their ancestral land in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Phillip J. Stevens was named to this post, a Sioux spokesman said, so the Sioux tribes could show a united front in their campaign to persuade the federal government to pay $3.1 billion in reparations and return 1.3 million acres in South Dakota.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1989 | RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writer
Almost a year since he vowed to help the Sioux Indians achieve their 111-year-old dream of recovering the sacred Black Hills of South Dakota, Newport Beach millionaire Philip Stevens has found the task more daunting and frustrating than he ever imagined. In the time since Stevens stepped forward to offer his expertise as a successful entrepreneur to help the Sioux, the eight tribes of the Great Sioux Nation are no closer to recovering even a single acre of Black Hills land, much less the 1.
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | BILL HARLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Isadora White Calf has two big cardboard boxes in his house. They used to contain computers, but White Calf has not moved onto the information superhighway. Not by a long shot. He is an Oglala Sioux who lives on western South Dakota's sprawling Pine Ridge Reservation. White Calf, 60, and 13 family members share a tiny two-room house with no running water. The computer boxes are used to store clothing, for lack of a chest of drawers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1994 | DEBBIE KONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His arms folded majestically and a headdress of white feathers cascading down his back, the Special Chief of the Great Sioux Nation stood with kindergartners Tuesday watching Sioux dancers perform amid chanting voices and beating drums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1993 | MATT KELLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The buffalo graze calmly on the frost-covered prairie, their breath fogging the air as if nothing has changed in two centuries, their presence offering hope of a revived covenant with the Sioux. Behind them, the rolling plains stretch to a hazy horizon at the Missouri River in north-central South Dakota. Fred DuBray gestures at the small herd of yearlings. He explains that the buffalo family structure mirrors the way the Sioux divided themselves into tiospa, or extended families.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody knows her birth name. Zintkala Nuni, the Lakota call her. Lost Bird. Today, she is lost no more. A century after the infant was discovered alive, lying beneath her mother's body on the killing fields of Wounded Knee, her remains have been brought home. In a traditional ceremony, Lost Bird was interred Thursday, near the mass grave where 200 slain Native Americans, including her mother, were unceremoniously buried Jan. 3, 1891.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a century after the U.S. Cavalry killed 400 Sioux at Wounded Knee, S.D., ending the U.S.-Indian wars, the National Park Service has decided to begin taking steps to establish a national historical park on the site of the battle. Park Service officials said Saturday that they plan to order a feasibility study designed to pave the way for possible acquisition of the land. Most of the 330 acres at the site where the massacre began are already part of the Pine Ridge Indian reservation.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of American Indians arrived on foot and horseback at this massacre site to commemorate the 100th anniversary Saturday of one of the saddest days in their history. About 100 horseback riders and another 100 people watched as Indians conducted a spiritual ceremony in sub-freezing temperatures Saturday morning at the grave site of Sioux Indians killed by U.S. soldiers a century ago.
NEWS
November 16, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Sam Eaglestaff, 57, born in poverty on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in central South Dakota and retired now among his destitute people, has had a dalliance the last few months with an unaccustomed emotion. Hope. For as long as Eaglestaff--and most of the 54,000 Indians on the eight Sioux reservations in the Dakotas, Nebraska and Montana--can remember, the tribe has struggled fitfully to win compensation for the seizure of its sacred lands in the Black Hills by the U.S.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | LARRY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost 200 years, pioneers, adventurers and opportunists have found this Missouri River town a friendly, convenient way station on journeys to discovery, dreams and riches. Explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, Mormons heading toward their promised land and California-bound gold rush prospectors all paused in this western Iowa town.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is peaceful here, in the charnel quiet of a new day. Snow blankets the hills, now as then. The sun is shining. Listen: from the valley to the west, faintly, the lowing of cattle, the barking of dogs. Even closer: the echo of what happened here. Beside Chankpe Opi Wakpala--a creek called Wounded Knee--more than 200 people died 100 years ago, many of them women and children. The sacred Ghost Dance did not save them. Whether what happened was a battle or massacre will perhaps be debated forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire reports
Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and Kris Kristofferson held a concert with Indian performers aimed at bringing Indians and whites closer together. Sunday's Concert for Reconciliation stemmed from Gov. George Mickelson's declaration of 1990 as Year of Reconciliation between whites and Indians. Between 150 and 400 Indian men, women and children were killed Dec. 29, 1890, by cavalry gunfire at Wounded Knee.
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