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August 15, 2012 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Sir Mix-a-Lot's "Baby Got Back" has remained the go-to anthem for celebrating voluptuous bottoms since its release 20 years ago (yes, it's really been that long -- try not to wince at that fact). Now, the tawdry party jam that's found a permanent home at frat parties and sketchy nightclubs across the U.S. has gotten a pretty cool makeover by a YouTuber with a scary amount of free time. Using clips from more that 295 films and TV shows, the song is spoken-sung by a breadth of characters from classic cinema titles including “Casablanca,” “Desperado,” “Good Will Hunting,” “Pulp Ficton” and “Full Metal Jacket.”  Of course, the frenetically edited clip -- it could greatly benefit from a warning to viewers prone to epileptic seizures -- also pulls greatly from seminal frat brother gems such as “American Pie,” “Animal House” and “Dazed and Confused.” (Check out the video below)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The season of Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe" is winding down, her so-called "wish in a well" has long been thrown. The addictive ode to obsessive ambivalence, propelled into the heads of millions after a Justin Bieber tweet in the spring, can safely be called the proverbial "song of the summer. " At slumber parties and pool parties, during barbecues, while jogging or making out, in front of YouTube on repeat, remixed and covered thousands of times by amateurs, "Call Me Maybe" has been everywhere.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1994
Let's assume that rock producer Brad Wood rests on the seventh day from all his work, and assume that the three albums you mentioned (including Liz Phair's "Whip-Smart") took at least three weeks each to do (Pop Eye, Nov. 20). Then we calculate that the 47 other albums he said he did this year took about five days each for rehearsal, setting up the instruments, recording songs, doing all the vocals and overdubs and then mixing the record. This means that the amazing Mr. Wood must complete something like two or three songs a day, recorded and mixed, every single working day of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Sir Mix-a-Lot's "Baby Got Back" has remained the go-to anthem for celebrating voluptuous bottoms since its release 20 years ago (yes, it's really been that long -- try not to wince at that fact). Now, the tawdry party jam that's found a permanent home at frat parties and sketchy nightclubs across the U.S. has gotten a pretty cool makeover by a YouTuber with a scary amount of free time. Using clips from more that 295 films and TV shows, the song is spoken-sung by a breadth of characters from classic cinema titles including “Casablanca,” “Desperado,” “Good Will Hunting,” “Pulp Ficton” and “Full Metal Jacket.”  Of course, the frenetically edited clip -- it could greatly benefit from a warning to viewers prone to epileptic seizures -- also pulls greatly from seminal frat brother gems such as “American Pie,” “Animal House” and “Dazed and Confused.” (Check out the video below)
NEWS
September 13, 2007 | Margaret Wappler, Times Staff Writer
Sir Mix-A-Lot, the Seattle rapper who slammed skinny models in his 1992 big-booty anthem "Baby Got Back," isn't one for vigorous exercise. "Have you seen me lately?" he said from the road outside Vegas. "I hit the treadmill this morning, but that was strictly walking. That's about as much as I can take." But that won't stop him from performing at this year's Nike Run Hit Remix: The Power Song Edition, a five-mile race set to live performances of the most incorrigibly popular tracks of the '90s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT
"Me? A sexist? Are you kidding?" Seattle-based rapper Sir Mix-A-Lot seems genuinely indignant--which isn't quite the reaction you'd expect from someone who's been nicknamed "Sir Sexist" because of his hit single "Baby Got Back." The record, which has been No. 1 for three weeks and sold more than 1 million copies, is a rollicking homage to plump female behinds. Since the record focuses on black women, some have also labeled the Def American release racist. "A bad rap," says Mix-A-Lot, 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1994 | HEIDI SIEGMUND
Sir Mix-a-Lot is the rare rap artist whose style is so distinctive that even a hip-hop dabbler can name that rapper within a couple of notes. Whether it's his semi-singing rap delivery or his trademark lashing beats, he put Seattle on the rap map with his distinguished sound. Mix--who wrote, mixed, arranged, engineered and produced--has created an album that incorporates more '70s funk than his three earlier efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During an unusual half-hour on Los Angeles' airwaves Wednesday, one of the officers facing federal civil rights charges in the beating of Rodney G. King squared off with rap-music star Sir Mix-A-Lot. The verbal sparring match on KABC's "Ken and Barkley Company" radio show occurred when the rap star joined an in-progress interview with suspended Los Angeles Police Officer Laurence M. Powell.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Chris Willman, Chris Willman writes regularly for Calendar. and
If there was a "Baby's Got Back," it was probably inevitable there'd be a "Baby's Got Front." Still, the breast-obsessed new video "Put 'Em on the Glass" marks an instant rift in rapper Sir Mix-a-Lot's unlikely alliance with those women who saw his paean to plump derrieres, "Baby's Got Back," as a liberating corrective to thin-is-better stereotypes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The season of Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe" is winding down, her so-called "wish in a well" has long been thrown. The addictive ode to obsessive ambivalence, propelled into the heads of millions after a Justin Bieber tweet in the spring, can safely be called the proverbial "song of the summer. " At slumber parties and pool parties, during barbecues, while jogging or making out, in front of YouTube on repeat, remixed and covered thousands of times by amateurs, "Call Me Maybe" has been everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2008 | Stephanie Lysaght, Times Staff Writer
Looking back on the beginning of the night, I saw no signs that something truly sinister was afoot. When I picked up my press pass from will call on Thursday, I heard no frantically barking dogs; when I handed my ticket to the usher, I felt not a tinge of Santa Anas. And yet, a great atrocity was about to take place in the "So You Think You Can Dance" studio. Inside, everything seemed normal as well. I found my seat beside reporters from US Weekly and People, while Tommy the warmup guy recruited girls from the audience to dance to Sir Mix-a-Lot.
NEWS
September 13, 2007 | Margaret Wappler, Times Staff Writer
Sir Mix-A-Lot, the Seattle rapper who slammed skinny models in his 1992 big-booty anthem "Baby Got Back," isn't one for vigorous exercise. "Have you seen me lately?" he said from the road outside Vegas. "I hit the treadmill this morning, but that was strictly walking. That's about as much as I can take." But that won't stop him from performing at this year's Nike Run Hit Remix: The Power Song Edition, a five-mile race set to live performances of the most incorrigibly popular tracks of the '90s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1994
Let's assume that rock producer Brad Wood rests on the seventh day from all his work, and assume that the three albums you mentioned (including Liz Phair's "Whip-Smart") took at least three weeks each to do (Pop Eye, Nov. 20). Then we calculate that the 47 other albums he said he did this year took about five days each for rehearsal, setting up the instruments, recording songs, doing all the vocals and overdubs and then mixing the record. This means that the amazing Mr. Wood must complete something like two or three songs a day, recorded and mixed, every single working day of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Chris Willman, Chris Willman writes regularly for Calendar. and
If there was a "Baby's Got Back," it was probably inevitable there'd be a "Baby's Got Front." Still, the breast-obsessed new video "Put 'Em on the Glass" marks an instant rift in rapper Sir Mix-a-Lot's unlikely alliance with those women who saw his paean to plump derrieres, "Baby's Got Back," as a liberating corrective to thin-is-better stereotypes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1994 | HEIDI SIEGMUND
Sir Mix-a-Lot is the rare rap artist whose style is so distinctive that even a hip-hop dabbler can name that rapper within a couple of notes. Whether it's his semi-singing rap delivery or his trademark lashing beats, he put Seattle on the rap map with his distinguished sound. Mix--who wrote, mixed, arranged, engineered and produced--has created an album that incorporates more '70s funk than his three earlier efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During an unusual half-hour on Los Angeles' airwaves Wednesday, one of the officers facing federal civil rights charges in the beating of Rodney G. King squared off with rap-music star Sir Mix-A-Lot. The verbal sparring match on KABC's "Ken and Barkley Company" radio show occurred when the rap star joined an in-progress interview with suspended Los Angeles Police Officer Laurence M. Powell.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2008 | Stephanie Lysaght, Times Staff Writer
Looking back on the beginning of the night, I saw no signs that something truly sinister was afoot. When I picked up my press pass from will call on Thursday, I heard no frantically barking dogs; when I handed my ticket to the usher, I felt not a tinge of Santa Anas. And yet, a great atrocity was about to take place in the "So You Think You Can Dance" studio. Inside, everything seemed normal as well. I found my seat beside reporters from US Weekly and People, while Tommy the warmup guy recruited girls from the audience to dance to Sir Mix-a-Lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT
"Me? A sexist? Are you kidding?" Seattle-based rapper Sir Mix-A-Lot seems genuinely indignant--which isn't quite the reaction you'd expect from someone who's been nicknamed "Sir Sexist" because of his hit single "Baby Got Back." The record, which has been No. 1 for three weeks and sold more than 1 million copies, is a rollicking homage to plump female behinds. Since the record focuses on black women, some have also labeled the Def American release racist. "A bad rap," says Mix-A-Lot, 28.
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