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BUSINESS
November 17, 1992 | JACK SEARLES
Business is improving at some of Ventura County's mid-priced housing tracts, but most prospective buyers still lack confidence about the future, reports Ernest V. Siracusa, a marketing researcher who closely follows the county's home-building industry. His Westlake Village firm, the Siracusa Co., produces a quarterly report tracking the sales of new homes; it is distributed by the Ventura office of Gateway Title Co.
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BUSINESS
November 17, 1992 | JACK SEARLES
Business is improving at some of Ventura County's mid-priced housing tracts, but most prospective buyers still lack confidence about the future, reports Ernest V. Siracusa, a marketing researcher who closely follows the county's home-building industry. His Westlake Village firm, the Siracusa Co., produces a quarterly report tracking the sales of new homes; it is distributed by the Ventura office of Gateway Title Co.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1988
According to a recent study, the average price for new single-family houses in the Santa Clarita and Antelope Valleys is on the rise. The study, conducted by The Siracusa Co., a real estate market research firm in Westlake Village, compared the sales of new houses and condominiums from Newhall to Lancaster in the 1987 winter quarter, November to January, to spring 1987 sales, February to April.
REAL ESTATE
April 5, 1987
The retail vacancy rate in Ventura County is only 2%, but the office vacancy factor is 18% and the industrial space vacancy rate was 20% and climbing at the beginning of the year, according to a forecast by Grubb & Ellis Commercial Brokerage Services. According to the firm's study, 739,000 square feet of new office space will come on the market this year, up from just 135,000 square feet completed in 1986.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | WILLIAM DIEPENBROCK, Times Staff Writer
Prices for new homes in Ventura County jumped 19.7% from July to September, and the number of new houses and condominiums ready for occupancy dropped to a 10-year low of 11, a new report states. The average home cost $317,810, up from $265,448 in the previous quarter, according to the Metro Bulletin, a quarterly published by Continental Land Title Co. Buyers will shell out an average of $350,000 for a new house, up about 22% from the previous quarter, the report said.
REAL ESTATE
June 1, 1986 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Despite an increased leasing pace that resulted in 376,809 square feet of space being leased during the first quarter of 1986, the overhang of available industrial space in Ventura County grew to 3.7 million square feet--a 29.7-month supply at current market absorption rates.
REAL ESTATE
June 1, 1986 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
It's almost a cliche in the commercial and industrial real estate market that Ventura County is at that stage of development where Orange County was 10 to 15 years ago. It would be a cliche, except that so much is taking place to make it a reality. Despite increasing no-growth sentiment toward residential development, virtually all of the communities along the Ventura Freeway in the 26-mile sector from Woodland Hills to Newbury Park are seeing rapid commercial and industrial growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a blow painful both economically and symbolically, Exxon Corp. has announced plans to close its West Coast production headquarters in Thousand Oaks and relocate 150 employees. Exxon's departure underscores the decline of the oil industry that once powered Ventura County, shaping the regional economy, influencing local politics and employing much of the work force during the 1940s and '50s.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the promised land. So thought Jeanine and Joel Price when they moved to Thousand Oaks from Northridge four years ago. The couple loved the green belts and open space of this east Ventura County community, as well as its highly rated public schools and near-absence of violent crime. Today, the Prices live in a four-bedroom house in a neighborhood that reminds them of the San Fernando Valley 25 years ago, when they were growing up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, economist Ron Halcrow had some bad news for Palmdale and Lancaster, the dusty desert towns that had become two of California's fastest growing cities almost overnight. At the northern edge of Los Angeles County, where dozens of spanking-new housing tracts had sprouted in the old alfalfa fields during the mid- to late 1980s, he saw dark clouds on the horizon.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside the grandest building in one of Oxnard's grandest new business complexes, 461 parking spaces lie in the afternoon sun. Four hundred and sixty are empty. And in the 111,478 square feet of office space above, there are no tenants. Judged by such numbers, Ventura County may be the empty-office capital of California. The Oxnard building, once hailed as a new Chevron regional headquarters, is only one stop on a formidable tour of empty halls, quiet courtyards and echoing atriums.
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