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SPORTS
March 5, 1990 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Isphording flashed a wide smile as she crossed the finish line as the top female finisher in the fifth Los Angeles Marathon Sunday. Isphording had every reason to smile. Doctors told Isphording that she might never walk again, let alone run, after she underwent back surgery to repair a ruptured disc in April of 1987. "I really don't know how it (the ruptured disc) happened," she said. "It wasn't like I was taking out the trash and I felt it go. It paralyzed me.
SPORTS
February 29, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is possible to be freed from tyranny, only to be enslaved by freedom's responsibilities. This is what Tatyana Zuyeva has come to know. Zuyeva is one of seven women from the former Soviet Union who will run in Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon. The race will serve as an Olympic trials for the Commonwealth of Independent States team, but it also will serve as a political primer on the tension brimming in the newly independent republics.
SPORTS
March 5, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian Peter Fonseca, running in his first marathon, found himself in a pack of three runners leading the race with only one mile to go in Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon. Alongside Fonseca, 23, were two men who were a decade older and had run scores of world-class marathons. Suddenly, the men began to run with almost wild abandon, sprinting hard after running 25 miles. It was a pivotal moment for Fonseca, and a telling moment, too. For in marathons, as in life, experience is the best teacher.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 19,000 runners trekked through the City of Angels on Sunday, and the city they saw during Los Angeles' fifth annual marathon was as colorful as their sweat-drenched T-shirts and as alive as a jogger on a high. The race turned Los Angeles into a 26.2-mile-long block party. On Olvera Street, a mariachi band played an upbeat serenade. In Chinatown, shopkeepers watched from fish markets and bakeries as schoolchildren performed a traditional lion dance.
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