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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1986
Until Calendar is expressed entirely in visuals, we need to get the printed words right. The story on Siskel and Ebert makes the who/whom mistake twice. On the cover: "Standing is Siskel ( whom Ebert says is 'the world's baldest critic'). "Siskel wasn't interested in Allen-- whom he felt was overexposed." Doesn't anyone check the copy? ELEANOR BREESE Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
"At the Movies," the TV series that was (under a variety of names) the longtime home of bantering film critics Roger Ebert and the late Gene Siskel, premiered with two new hosts Sunday night, A.O. Scott of the New York Times and Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune (Siskel's old paper and corporate cousin to the Los Angeles Times, where Phillips had earlier worked and which still sometimes runs his reviews). Promo spots preceding its debut promised "two accomplished critics," "serious reviews from serious journalists" and "voices you trust," the implication being that the hosts being replaced, Ben Lyons (an E!
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1986
I am a 6-month-old child. I think Roger Ebert is too expansive and Siskel needs more hair, appropriately speaking. BOBBY SMITH JR. Camarillo
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1999
Michael Miller is not the only one "Looking Up to the Balcony" (Riffs, Calendar Weekend, March 18) for movie selection guidance from the late Gene Siskel. I too am left with a giant void in my life. My wife and I (and my kids when they got old enough) watched the "Siskel & Ebert" television program weekly since its inception over 20 years ago. We taped it when we were out. It was our bible for deciding on which films we would spend our money to see or to rent. I have probably seen more of their shows than any show ever broadcast.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1990
Some people (including me) prefer to hear what the critics say only after seeing the film. That way we can tell how smart the critics are; that is, whether they agreed with us or not. I have come to learn that if Rex Reed and Siskel and Ebert all liked a film for wordy reasons, it will probably bore me senseless. JOHN DEGATINA, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1987
Okay, Gene and Roger, now you can sound off: Siskel would have replaced Paul Newman with Jeff Goldblum for "The Fly"--ignored, Siskel figures, because of the Academy's anti-sci-fi bias. (Sigourney Weaver only got on because "it was such a weak year for actresses.") Siskel only liked Matlin and Kathleen Turner of the whole best-actress batch--where Chloe Webb ("Sid and Nancy") and Cathy Tyson ("Mona Lisa") should have been included.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
Wonder if Siskel and Ebert ever have these problems? You've hired a baby-sitter, had an enjoyable, leisurely dinner, paid for parking, tickets, popcorn and sodas and are now kicked back watching the feature film. As if on cue, the people behind turn into Andrew Dice Clay clones. They talk, they giggle, they laugh at the romantic parts, make kissing sounds during the tender scenes, and they give away plot points at the most suspenseful moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1986
Gene Siskel has been asked to step down as film critic of the Chicago Tribune, Daily Variety reported Tuesday. Siskel and Roger Ebert, the film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, recently announced they were not renewing their TV syndication contract with Tribune Entertainment and instead had signed with Walt Disney Domestic Television. Tribune editor Jim Squires told Variety that Siskel was being removed from the critic's slot because of the time demands that the Disney pact will make.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | ROBERT BURNS, (Wolfgang Jones and Bubba Versailles are aliases that Burns sometimes uses to protect the innocent--and himself.)
THE SHOW Siskel & Ebert, 6:30 p.m. Sundays on ABC. THE SETUP Fashion critics "Wolfgang Jones" and "Bubba Versailles" review their counterparts in film and video, Gene Siskel (right) and Roger Ebert (left). THE LOOK Jones: There certainly is a level of clothing coordination here that I haven't seen since the do-wop groups of the '60s. Versailles: Definitely. What do we have? Two pairs of chinos, two black sport jackets, two sweaters, two open-collar sport shirts. Jones: I see a trend forming.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1986 | LEWIS BEALE
"Gene! Love the show, but you really do have to lighten up a bit, honey." Gene Siskel, co-star of "At the Movies," the wildly successful syndicated TV movie-review show, was hanging out with wife and friends at Ed Debevic's, the Windy City's trendy answer to a retro 1950s hamburger joint.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1999 | STEPHEN SIMON, Stephen Simon (formerly Deutsch) is the co-founder of Metafilmics and has produced several films, including "Somewhere in Time," "All the Right Moves" and "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure."
For me, film criticism has been on life support for many years. Sadly, with the tragic death of Gene Siskel, it now has flatlined. Just a few days ago, a nationally known news anchor told me that the problem with film criticism today is that "most critics are writing to and for each other, not for the public." I heartily agree. Siskel and Roger Ebert were the only film critics who were truly answerable to the public. TV shows depend on ratings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1999
I began receiving the calls Saturday night around 10 p.m. My friends knew how upset I'd be; they knew how I, the great movie fanatic, revered film critic Gene Siskel. Through the years, I enjoyed watching Siskel and Roger Ebert's relationship evolve from being brittle rivals to being openly affectionate friends. Ultimately, that's what I considered Gene Siskel: a friend. A movie buddy. The greatest service S&E have performed all these years has been not simply to inform us, but to actually make the movies better.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Gene Siskel, dead at 53. Thumbs down to that script. After his death Saturday, two of the TV obits I watched ended with the perfunctory: "He will be missed." It was classic anchorese, what newscast androids always say when a celebrity dies, making you wonder if it's spontaneous--what they think is expected of them--or a Ted Baxter read from a TelePrompTer. Yet here I am saying it, too. I will miss Siskel as a friend. Not literally. I barely knew him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gene Siskel, who along with partner Roger Ebert brought film criticism to the masses with their weekly television program and ingeniously concise thumbs-up, thumbs-down rating system, died here Saturday at age 53.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1995 | Donald Liebenson, Donald Liebenson is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
September marked the start of the 20th TV season for movie reviewers Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert--an impressive achievement in the capricious world of television, especially for a show whose format has remained basically unchanged over two decades: two newspaper guys sitting around talking about the movies and showing film clips. Of course, these aren't just any two guys.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One might think the topic would have been popcorn on Monday when film critic Gene Siskel spoke to clients of the American Maize-Products Co., here from Indiana for a convention. But the only nods to corn were the polenta and the corn salsa on the steaks. That doesn't mean folks didn't get an earful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of America's most popular movie critics used a luncheon address Monday at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art to criticize politicians who accuse the entertainment industry of glorifying violence. Gene Siskel, half of television's "Siskel & Ebert" review team and film critic for the Chicago Tribune, said he thinks filmmakers, record producers and others in show business should always "be responsible for the products that they sell," but it is disingenuous to blame them for the sins of society.
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