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NEWS
July 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
A 45-year-old San Francisco man has been reported missing in a remote area of Siskiyou County, officials said. Sheriff's search and rescue teams were searching for Paul Robert Pierson, a botanist who was working with four other people on a botany survey near the Del Norte County line, officials said. He was reported missing Saturday afternoon. Members of his group said Pierson was about 200 yards ahead of them when a thunderstorm broke out.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - Modoc County, in remote northeastern California, has voted to join neighboring Siskiyou County in its bid to withdraw from the state and team with southern Oregon counterparts to go it alone. Tuesday's 4-0 vote by the Modoc County Board of Supervisors - with one supervisor absent - to explore the pursuit of a state of Jefferson came just weeks after Siskiyou County supervisors voted 4-1 on a resolution to back secession. Modoc's board chairman, Geri Byrne, told the Redding Record-Searchlight that she placed the measure on the agenda “because I heard from a number of people in my district that wanted to do such.… We're not saying we're seceding today, we're saying let's look into it.” “This is going to have to be something the people bring forward,” Byrne said.
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BUSINESS
January 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unocal to Sell Geothermal Properties in Siskiyou County: Unocal Corp. has agreed to sell its Glass Mountain-Medicine Lake geothermal properties in Northern California to California Energy Co. The move is part of the oil company's continuing two-year plan to divest $700 million in assets. Terms of the sale, expected to close by March 31, were not revealed.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
AULT, Colo. - Jennifer Weichel stood scowling behind the counter of her antique shop, in front of a life-size cutout of John Wayne, and fairly spat the word out: "Used!" It's how, she said, people in rural northern Colorado feel they're treated by those in Denver and its sprawling suburbs, the ones with all the political power, who think milk comes from a carton and meat arrives magically shrink-wrapped inside the butcher case. "They don't even know who we are up here," she said, her anger like the smoke curling from Wayne's six-shooter.
OPINION
April 6, 2009
Re "A new kind of water war springs up," April 2 The Times' article about Nestle trying to bottle Colorado's water got the headline wrong. There's nothing new about Nestle targeting small rural communities to make a profit off of their pure spring water. Here in California, the residents of Siskiyou County have been fighting Nestle for more than five years to prevent the company from building one of the nation's largest water-bottling plants at the headwaters of the McCloud River, which feeds the Sacramento River, an important water source for the entire state.
NEWS
January 18, 1989
A southbound Southern Pacific freight train struck and killed 27 antelope near Tulelake after the herd stubbornly refused to leave the tracks, wildlife officials said. Robbie Robinson, a California Department of Fish and Game warden, said the antelope were run down along a 1 1/2-mile stretch of track between Tulelake, in Siskiyou County, and Canby, in Modoc County. He said the train made an effort to stop.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Northern California counties announced Friday that they have settled legal claims against Southern Pacific Lines stemming from a pesticide spill that devastated a pristine stretch of the Upper Sacramento River last summer. Under the agreement, the railroad will pay Siskiyou and Shasta counties $263,000 each for economic losses they suffered in the spill. In return, Shasta County will drop its lawsuit against Southern Pacific and Siskiyou County will waive its right to press a court claim.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 1990
I grew up in Siskiyou County during the events described in "The Ballad of Hooty Croy" (by David Talbot, June 24), and I knew Bo Hittson. Tony Serra's eloquently impassioned and utterly inaccurate defense rested on a single premise: that villainous Siskiyou County is so violently bigoted that Native Americans live in fear for their lives and that consequently Croy had no choice but to gun down this law officer--in "self-defense." In 20 years of living in Siskiyou County, moving among all types of citizens from shop clerks to cowboys and attending Yreka High School alongside Native Americans like Croy, I never witnessed an act or word of prejudice against a Native American, nor did I know anyone who harbored such bigotry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2003 | Michelle Munn, Special to The Times
Gov. Gray Davis has proposed increasing California's sales tax by 1 cent to help ease the budget deficit. But for the businesses and residents of Siskiyou County in Northern California, this could mean only one thing: the further erosion of their local economy, as residents stream north to shop in the tax-free haven of Oregon. In southern Oregon where the timber industry once sprouted, retail and service industries now flourish.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | Michelle Locke, Associated Press
Along the far northern edge of California, far from the bright lights of Hollywood and the foggy charms of San Francisco, exists a place many have never heard of: the State of Jefferson. But for those in the know, the name -- a slogan from a quixotic past -- says a lot about the state of mind in this wild, beautiful and sparsely populated country. Jefferson, a would-have-been 49th state made up of a handful of neighboring counties in Northern California and southern Oregon, lasted only a few days in 1941 before it was squashed by the cold reality of Pearl Harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Kate Mather, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
It's the Golden State's latest version of the Great Secession. Fed up by Sacramento's regulations and Southern California's political sway, residents in one rural Northern California county are taking steps to leave the state. The Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors voted, 4-1, on Tuesday to pursue seceding from California, the Redding Record Searchlight reported . Proponents say Siskiyou should form a new state -- called Jefferson -- with other counties in Northern California and Southern Oregon they believe share similar interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Early one morning in February 2012, thieves crept into the Siskiyou County Courthouse, made off with more than $1.25 million in gold and other items from the lobby's display case and disappeared. Now, more than a year later, police say they know who did it. In a news release this week, the Siskiyou County Sheriff's Department said it had issued felony arrest warrants for 49-year-old David Dean Johnson of El Cerrito and 51-year-old Scott Wayne Bailey of El Sobrante. The pair are the primary suspects in the heist, authorities said.
TRAVEL
December 2, 2012 | By Barbara A. Noe
YREKA, Calif. - Deep in Siskiyou County in far Northern California, high granite peaks and rocky streams have long incited gold miners, including my grandfather, who in the 1930s lived with his family - my grandmother, mother and aunt - in a two-room cabin near the Dewey gold mine southwest of Yreka. My mother, who doesn't remember much about the area because she was 3 when they left, and I recently headed to this beautiful backwater to find out what we could about the gold mine where my grandfather worked and to bask in the region's simple charms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Thieves broke a glass case, taking nuggets that had been collected over decades. Police, Siskiyou County sheriff's deputies and the California Department of Justice are investigating. Thieves in Yreka, Calif., made off with $3 million in gold nuggets Wednesday after breaking into the Siskiyou County Courthouse and smashing a glass case that contained a display on the area's mining history, officials said. The collection in the town near the Oregon border was about the only remnant of the Northern California county's little-known Gold Rush days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010 | Maria L. La Ganga
Kayla Burris, soon to turn 6, had three loose teeth, a library card and a deep need for information. So she and her mother headed to the McCloud Branch Library on a recent Thursday afternoon, located  "Franklin and the Tooth Fairy" in the neat stacks and settled down in the big blue recliner for a little research. "We now know that the tooth fairy doesn't always leave money," said Stephanie Burris, who spends several hours a week with her children in the tiny library of this remote lumber town at the base of Mt. Shasta.
OPINION
April 6, 2009
Re "A new kind of water war springs up," April 2 The Times' article about Nestle trying to bottle Colorado's water got the headline wrong. There's nothing new about Nestle targeting small rural communities to make a profit off of their pure spring water. Here in California, the residents of Siskiyou County have been fighting Nestle for more than five years to prevent the company from building one of the nation's largest water-bottling plants at the headwaters of the McCloud River, which feeds the Sacramento River, an important water source for the entire state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - Modoc County, in remote northeastern California, has voted to join neighboring Siskiyou County in its bid to withdraw from the state and team with southern Oregon counterparts to go it alone. Tuesday's 4-0 vote by the Modoc County Board of Supervisors - with one supervisor absent - to explore the pursuit of a state of Jefferson came just weeks after Siskiyou County supervisors voted 4-1 on a resolution to back secession. Modoc's board chairman, Geri Byrne, told the Redding Record-Searchlight that she placed the measure on the agenda “because I heard from a number of people in my district that wanted to do such.… We're not saying we're seceding today, we're saying let's look into it.” “This is going to have to be something the people bring forward,” Byrne said.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | MICHAEL HARRIS, Harris is a Times suburban editor
The dead trout were long gone when I visited my hometown, Dunsmuir, for the first time since the July 14 chemical spill into the Sacramento River. The river, where I swam as a boy, where I caught my first fish, swirled green and brown over volcanic boulders, looking as clear as ever. The willows on its banks were unharmed. Only a few small rust-colored plants caught my eye--signs of poison or just of the season? The river splashed and whispered.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | Michelle Locke, Associated Press
Along the far northern edge of California, far from the bright lights of Hollywood and the foggy charms of San Francisco, exists a place many have never heard of: the State of Jefferson. But for those in the know, the name -- a slogan from a quixotic past -- says a lot about the state of mind in this wild, beautiful and sparsely populated country. Jefferson, a would-have-been 49th state made up of a handful of neighboring counties in Northern California and southern Oregon, lasted only a few days in 1941 before it was squashed by the cold reality of Pearl Harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2003 | Michelle Munn, Special to The Times
Gov. Gray Davis has proposed increasing California's sales tax by 1 cent to help ease the budget deficit. But for the businesses and residents of Siskiyou County in Northern California, this could mean only one thing: the further erosion of their local economy, as residents stream north to shop in the tax-free haven of Oregon. In southern Oregon where the timber industry once sprouted, retail and service industries now flourish.
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