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Siskiyou National Forest

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Standing in the ruins of a U.S. Forest Service fire lookout, Lou Gold told a group of schoolchildren the story of how a fawn saved the mountain from an evil demon. Gold, shaking his rattle of deer hooves, said people once lived in harmony with the spirits on their mountain, but traded the mountain to a demon for vacuum cleaners and cars.
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NATIONAL
April 1, 2005 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
Stan Chronister and the young man calling himself Purusha were probably never going to see eye to eye anyway. But they were certainly not doing so the other day, what with Purusha crouched 70 feet up in a Douglas fir tree, and Chronister pacing around on the ground below with a chain saw, cutting other trees here in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.
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NATIONAL
February 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Forest Service estimates that about 1.1 billion board feet of timber can be salvaged from land scorched by the Biscuit fire last summer. The service is considering salvage logging on about 51,000 acres of Siskiyou National Forest land burned by the nation's largest and most expensive wildfire of the season. But the figure doesn't factor in trees that have already deteriorated, or other restrictions, an official said.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
Loggers began cutting down trees inside an old growth forest reserve burned by the 2002 Biscuit fire on Monday after authorities hauled away protesters trying to block access. Five lumberjacks toting chainsaws, axes and fuel cans hiked past the protest site in the Siskiyou National Forest and a short while later the roar of chainsaws and trees crashing to earth could be heard. Authorities arrested 10 people and towed a disabled pickup draped with an Earth First! banner.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
The supervisor of the Siskiyou National Forest, bowing to public pressure, has suspended a planned sale of redwoods. Forest Supervisor Ron McCormick announced last week that he had deferred a timber sale for the Grapevine section of the forest that contains scattered redwoods. McCormick also said he would offer no other redwoods for sale until a plan for managing the giant trees is developed with the help of a citizens advisory committee.
NEWS
September 29, 1987
The West's largest forest fire continued to grow in Northern California's Klamath National Forest, but crews hoped to get it contained before much longer. More than 1,200 square miles of forest have been charred in several Western states since lightning storms began igniting blazes in late August. About 5,000 firefighters remained on the lines at the Klamath fire, where 2,000 more acres burned over the weekend to bring the total there to nearly 226,000 acres.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
Loggers began cutting down trees inside an old growth forest reserve burned by the 2002 Biscuit fire on Monday after authorities hauled away protesters trying to block access. Five lumberjacks toting chainsaws, axes and fuel cans hiked past the protest site in the Siskiyou National Forest and a short while later the roar of chainsaws and trees crashing to earth could be heard. Authorities arrested 10 people and towed a disabled pickup draped with an Earth First! banner.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | From Times Wire Service Reports
Thousands of firefighters remained on the job Saturday in hard-hit Northern California while others in Oregon and Idaho made slow progress against the last major forest fires in the three states. Fires in the West have burned more than 1,100 square miles since Aug. 28. In California, about 8,500 of the 11,000 firefighters fighting the fires Saturday were concentrated on two dozen uncontained and extremely smoky fires in the Klamath National Forest where 174,000 acres have already been scorched.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | From United Press International
The crash of an air tanker and the deaths of the three crewmen aboard brought to seven the number of firefighters killed in blazes that have blackened about 760,000 acres of Western wilderness during the last three weeks, officials said Thursday. The C-119, carrying fire retardant, crashed Wednesday night "during an initial attack" on a fire six miles west of Castle Crags State Park in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Northern California, officials said.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration said Tuesday it will allow new mining to resume on nearly 1 million acres of southwestern Oregon's Siskiyou region, one of the most diverse ecological habitats in the country. The decision to cancel a two-year moratorium on new claims opens the area to more prospectors, many of whom build shacks on national forest and Bureau of Land Management land and use giant, gasoline-powered dredges to suck material from stream beds in search of gold.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Forest Service estimates that about 1.1 billion board feet of timber can be salvaged from land scorched by the Biscuit fire last summer. The service is considering salvage logging on about 51,000 acres of Siskiyou National Forest land burned by the nation's largest and most expensive wildfire of the season. But the figure doesn't factor in trees that have already deteriorated, or other restrictions, an official said.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration said Tuesday it will allow new mining to resume on nearly 1 million acres of southwestern Oregon's Siskiyou region, one of the most diverse ecological habitats in the country. The decision to cancel a two-year moratorium on new claims opens the area to more prospectors, many of whom build shacks on national forest and Bureau of Land Management land and use giant, gasoline-powered dredges to suck material from stream beds in search of gold.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some 200 million years ago, the Pacific sea floor shoved itself beneath the coastal plate, leaving exposed a primeval ocean under a crust of magnesium and iron. Rough shrubs grew. Over the years, hardy cedar and spruce pushed down roots. Today, the serpentine slopes and forested valleys of the Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon are a rare window into the ancient past. Some wildflower and tree species trace their roots back further than anything in the U.S. West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Standing in the ruins of a U.S. Forest Service fire lookout, Lou Gold told a group of schoolchildren the story of how a fawn saved the mountain from an evil demon. Gold, shaking his rattle of deer hooves, said people once lived in harmony with the spirits on their mountain, but traded the mountain to a demon for vacuum cleaners and cars.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
The supervisor of the Siskiyou National Forest, bowing to public pressure, has suspended a planned sale of redwoods. Forest Supervisor Ron McCormick announced last week that he had deferred a timber sale for the Grapevine section of the forest that contains scattered redwoods. McCormick also said he would offer no other redwoods for sale until a plan for managing the giant trees is developed with the help of a citizens advisory committee.
NEWS
September 29, 1987
The West's largest forest fire continued to grow in Northern California's Klamath National Forest, but crews hoped to get it contained before much longer. More than 1,200 square miles of forest have been charred in several Western states since lightning storms began igniting blazes in late August. About 5,000 firefighters remained on the lines at the Klamath fire, where 2,000 more acres burned over the weekend to bring the total there to nearly 226,000 acres.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some 200 million years ago, the Pacific sea floor shoved itself beneath the coastal plate, leaving exposed a primeval ocean under a crust of magnesium and iron. Rough shrubs grew. Over the years, hardy cedar and spruce pushed down roots. Today, the serpentine slopes and forested valleys of the Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon are a rare window into the ancient past. Some wildflower and tree species trace their roots back further than anything in the U.S. West.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2005 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
Stan Chronister and the young man calling himself Purusha were probably never going to see eye to eye anyway. But they were certainly not doing so the other day, what with Purusha crouched 70 feet up in a Douglas fir tree, and Chronister pacing around on the ground below with a chain saw, cutting other trees here in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | From Times Wire Service Reports
Thousands of firefighters remained on the job Saturday in hard-hit Northern California while others in Oregon and Idaho made slow progress against the last major forest fires in the three states. Fires in the West have burned more than 1,100 square miles since Aug. 28. In California, about 8,500 of the 11,000 firefighters fighting the fires Saturday were concentrated on two dozen uncontained and extremely smoky fires in the Klamath National Forest where 174,000 acres have already been scorched.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | From United Press International
The crash of an air tanker and the deaths of the three crewmen aboard brought to seven the number of firefighters killed in blazes that have blackened about 760,000 acres of Western wilderness during the last three weeks, officials said Thursday. The C-119, carrying fire retardant, crashed Wednesday night "during an initial attack" on a fire six miles west of Castle Crags State Park in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Northern California, officials said.
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