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Sister Souljah

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OPINION
July 12, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Before we move on to this campaign's next contretemps, it's worth considering the substance beyond the snickers over Jesse Jackson's candid, if unplanned, appraisal of Sen. Barack Obama. Jackson was a guest on a Fox News show Sunday and, while off camera, didn't realize that his microphone was on.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 12, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Before we move on to this campaign's next contretemps, it's worth considering the substance beyond the snickers over Jesse Jackson's candid, if unplanned, appraisal of Sen. Barack Obama. Jackson was a guest on a Fox News show Sunday and, while off camera, didn't realize that his microphone was on.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We are at war," New York rapper Sister Souljah said harshly during an interview on the eve of the release Tuesday of her debut album on Epic Records. "I am a soldier in this war." Other female rappers, notably MC Lyte and Queen Latifah, have addressed issues of black pride and unity, but in a positive, harmonious manner. So it will be a shock for many rap fans to hear the strident, militant views of Sister Souljah (pronounced soul-juh).
BOOKS
August 1, 1999 | PAULA L. WOODS, Paula L. Woods is the author of "Inner City Blues: A Charlotte Justice Novel."
There is a style of African American literature that might be called the "Ghetto Gothic" school of fiction, consisting typically of coming-of-age-stories of the black underclass that employ a vernacular and worldview unfamiliar to most readers. Publishers brought these often first-time authors' works to print in the latter half of the 20th century with stunning and sometimes controversial results.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sister Souljah, the New York "raptivist" whose militant black nationalist views were criticized by Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton last weekend, said Tuesday she is not a racist and has never promoted the killing of white people. "I do not advocate the murdering of anybody," Souljah said in a telephone interview from New York Tuesday. "Not white people. Not black people. That charge is absolutely ridiculous. Mr. Clinton took my comments completely out of context.
BOOKS
March 19, 1995 | Heidi Siegmund, Siegmund, a frequent contributor to the Times, is co-author of "The Ice Opinion" (St. Martin's)
A more appropriate title for Sister Souljah's first work of nonfiction might have been, "Smart Woman, Foolish Choices, II." For although the self-proclaimed "raptivist" soundly details numerous underlying tensions between African-American men and women, what stays with the reader is her personal journey through one failed relationship after another. It's no wonder her dalliances have turned out disastrous. Souljah's world is all about Souljah. She should've been an actress: "Enough about me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992
In rationalizing Sister Souljah's malicious suggestion that African-Americans should concentrate on killing whites, Jesse Jackson revealed the only color in the rainbow of his coalition: black. SAM DOMANCICH Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1992
This letter is prompted by the recent Jesse Jackson-Bill Clinton flap over Jackson's support of Sister Souljah. Let me see if I have this straight. Jackson publicly supports a young black woman who advocates that blacks take a week off from killing each other and kill white people instead. Clinton condemns the idea, Jackson condemns Clinton and says that Clinton owes Sister Souljah an apology. Well folks, I think that the real Jesse Jackson just stood up. If Jackson is really a leader as he claims to be, we really are in deep, deep trouble.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1992
Does part of the healing process require law-abiding, honest, hard-working Angelenos to welcome with open arms this anti-white rhetoric put forth by community leaders Sister Souljah, Ice-T and now Wanda Coleman? It's time to draw the line against all racism and bigoted, non-productive behavior. THOMAS GRETEMAN San Gabriel
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | BYRAN O. JACKSON, an associate professor of political science at Cal State Los Angeles, specializes in urban affairs and issues that affect African-Americans. He commented on the recent controversy over remarks made by rap artist Sister Souljah in an interview that were interpreted by some as an endorsement of violence against whites. Gov. Bill Clinton has called Souljah's remarks racist. Jackson told The Times: and
Sister Souljah hasn't been elected to anything. She's just a rap artist trying to make a living. Why would someone like Clinton take issue with her? I didn't see many whites taking David Duke to task publicly and he is a racist. How can you apply that term to her? I don't think Sister Souljah has joined any organization that has as a goal the annihilation of a race of people. And why are white folks so eager to call black folks racists?
BOOKS
March 19, 1995 | Heidi Siegmund, Siegmund, a frequent contributor to the Times, is co-author of "The Ice Opinion" (St. Martin's)
A more appropriate title for Sister Souljah's first work of nonfiction might have been, "Smart Woman, Foolish Choices, II." For although the self-proclaimed "raptivist" soundly details numerous underlying tensions between African-American men and women, what stays with the reader is her personal journey through one failed relationship after another. It's no wonder her dalliances have turned out disastrous. Souljah's world is all about Souljah. She should've been an actress: "Enough about me.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1992
Does part of the healing process require law-abiding, honest, hard-working Angelenos to welcome with open arms this anti-white rhetoric put forth by community leaders Sister Souljah, Ice-T and now Wanda Coleman? It's time to draw the line against all racism and bigoted, non-productive behavior. THOMAS GRETEMAN San Gabriel
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1992
It's not surprising that Ice-T, Sister Souljah and other rappers and rockers express far-out, shocking attitudes and opinions. Rebellion against authority and perceived or imagined injustices is a normal part of being young. What's surprising is that the media continue to fall all over themselves to report and glorify the outrageous and often infantile messages of these heretofore virtually unknown performers. Why not just ignore these extremes and simply give these angry kids a chance to grow up?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, Chuck Philips is a regular contributor to Calendar. and
I got my 12-gauge sawed off I got my headlights turned off I'm 'bout to bust some shots off I'm 'bout to dust some cops off. Cop Killer, better you than me. Cop Killer, f--- police brutality! --Ice-T, "Cop Killer" Ice-T is fed up with George Bush, Bill Clinton and other politicians taking potshots at rap artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992
In response to Jackson: This absurdly illogical piece presumes that one must belong to an organization to qualify as "racist" or dangerously genocidal. Conclusion: Since Sister Souljah doesn't belong to one, her "kill whites" message is not racist, dangerous or genocidal! Via such outrageous non-thinking, only murderers who belonged to an organization such as the Mafia would be condemnable. Jackson defends in blacks what he condemns in whites, and this passes for "teaching" at the college level.
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