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Sisterhood

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NEWS
October 6, 1994
In the past, giant chains have targeted local independent bookstores as a matter of policy. It is therefore difficult to believe K-mart-owned Borders' western regional manager's claim ("Chain Reaction," Sept. 29) that she was "dismayed . . . that we were going to be such a close neighbor of such a respected bookshop" (as Sisterhood, an independent bookstore across the street from Borders' new Westwood location). Equally unbelievable is her statement that she hopes Sisterhood will "do a better business because of spillover from us. Our employees will be instructed to refer people to Sisterhood."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By T.L. Stanley
Alyssa Milano has been in fairly racy series in her television career, such as the bed-hopping-crazy "Melrose Place," but she needed persuading to star in a drama called "Mistresses. " By its very title, not to mention its ongoing focus on infidelity, the ABC primetime soap seemed to the veteran actress to be a potential lightning rod. Milano, who eventually signed on as one of the four leading ladies, said she could just imagine the angry tweets when word leaked about a U.S. version of the hit BBC series.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Sisterhood is powerful in "A Thousand Acres," and you'd think that would be enough. Certainly it seems to be in those moments when Michelle Pfeiffer and Jessica Lange triumphantly share the screen as embattled siblings in this adaptation of Jane Smiley's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about the bonds and burdens of kinship and a gift that shatters a family. Playing sisters has been a longtime aim of these actresses, and they handle the opportunity beautifully.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
While former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton considers the pros and cons of trying, once again, to become this nation's first female president and Julia Louis-Dreyfus returns as the bumbling but pencil-skirt-rocking fictional vice president in HBO's "Veep," a strange day took from us two women who helped a generation redefine what it meant to be a woman. It's difficult to imagine former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and former Mouseketeer and pop music star Annette Funicello sharing much beyond today's obituary page - Thatcher died Monday, at 87, of a stroke; Funicello, at 70, of complications arising from multiple sclerosis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1991 | PERRY C. RIDDLE, Vivian Robbins' collection of 28 family photo albums reflects the importance of her family and her penchant for organization. In retirement, Robbins, a former bookkeeper, fills her schedule with meetings, classes and dinner parties. Robbins and her husband, Joe, live in North Hollywood
We came back from our honeymoon with $1.25, an apartment, which was hard to get in 1948, and a car that my father had bought for me when the war was over. So we had those two assets. That was great, and that's how we started. I worked part time, and I gave my husband every single paycheck that I ever made, because it's our money. From the beginning it was instilled in us that you just put away a certain amount for the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Another falsehood has emerged in the story of a privileged young white woman from Sherman Oaks whose memoir, "Love and Consequences," described her violent early years as a racially mixed foster child and drug-runner for the Bloods in South Central. Like those gangland tales, Margaret B. Jones' claim that she co-founded a Los Angeles foundation to help street kids appears to be fiction. The book has been recalled by Riverhead Books, its publisher. On the jacket of the book, Jones, whose real name is Margaret "Peggy" Seltzer, is described as "an active member" of Brother/SisterHood, "which works to reduce gang violence and mentor urban teens."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
FILM CRITIC "Julie & Julia" does it right. A consummate entertainment that echoes the rhythms and attitudes of classic Hollywood, it's a satisfying throwback to those old-fashioned movie fantasies where impossible dreams do come true. And, in this case, it really happened. Twice.
SPORTS
June 15, 2002
Lisa Dillman's article in the June 10 Times was interesting in that it shows a maturity on the part of the Williams sisters in dealing with the media. That is nice to hear. What no writer has addressed is the caliber of the final match of the French Open. If the No. 1 player in the world makes only one forehand winner and no backhand winners in 21 games of a match and the No. 1 and No. 2 players share 105 unforced errors, it seems to me the tennis-loving public was cheated. If playing each other in a match makes these tennis players so nervous they can't perform to a level that vaguely resembles their ability, maybe they shouldn't enter the same tournaments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1989 | Stacy Jenel Smith \f7
It's strictly at the formative stage, but Dionne Warwick, Gladys Knight and Patti LaBelle may join as Sisters in the Name of Love next year for what Warwick terms "a major world tour." Recording as a trio is also a possibility, Warwick told Outtakes. They'll make their first concert appearance as Sisters in the Name of Love on June 10 at Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall, part of NYC's "That's What Friends Are For" AIDS fund-raising weekend, which Warwick is spearheading. The three famed singers, who first teamed for a 1986 HBO special, have been talking about regrouping ever since, Warwick explained.
BOOKS
January 31, 1993 | ELLEN MELINKOFF, Melinkoff is a local free - lance writer.
When they opened Sisterhood Bookstore 20 years ago, Adele Wallace and Simone Wallace weren't sure there would be enough books for, about and/or by women to make a go of it. That thought makes them laugh these days. Their shelves are packed--and meticulously labeled according to subject matter. Body image. Literary criticism. Aging. Sexuality. Childbirth. Poetry. Biography. Chicana literature. Lesbian literature. Science fiction. Co-dependency. Battering. Spirituality. Travel. Sports.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
FILM CRITIC "Julie & Julia" does it right. A consummate entertainment that echoes the rhythms and attitudes of classic Hollywood, it's a satisfying throwback to those old-fashioned movie fantasies where impossible dreams do come true. And, in this case, it really happened. Twice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2009 | Reed Johnson
The daughters of Joni and Joan are alive and well and living these days in places like Buenos Aires and Portland, Ore. They also were on stage Tuesday night at the Troubadour, demonstrating to a transfixed crowd how they've absorbed the lessons of the aforementioned Mitchell, Baez and other elder stateswomen of the singer-songwriter sisterhood.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
Did former presidential candidate Rudy Giuliani influence Meryl Streep's portrayal of conservative avenging nun Sister Aloysius in "Doubt"? Consider, there is that moral certitude, the strange pursing of the lips, the occasionally maniacal righteousness. "I'll never tell," giggles Streep, then she slyly suggests a certain affinity between the two, that like Sister Aloysius, who's quite convinced of her own rectitude, Giuliani "is one of these people who is sure. He's sure.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
When a series of books has sold almost 9 million copies in North America and two of those books have been made into movies, coming up with a new and equally successful idea can be tough. That's the situation in which Ann Brashares seems to have been in when she wrote the kickoff to her new series, "3 Willows: The Sisterhood Grows." As the subtitle indicates, the book is as much a continuation of her hugely successful "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants" books as it is a departure.
FOOD
October 1, 2008 | Jenn Garbee, Special to The Times
IT'S ONE of the many home brew competitions that take place around the country each year. There's the panel of certified judges, the international entrants in 28 categories of beer and mead -- and there's the hops-filled afternoon of sipping and scribbling until a winner is crowned. But photos on the website for the Queen of Beer's Women's Homebrew competition -- this year's judging takes place Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2008 | Allyssa Lee, Special to The Times
For AS long as she can remember, Dona Granata has been fascinated by costumes, whether it be the theatrical attire of the stage or the opulent movie fashions of Hollywood's Golden Age. "It's always appealed to me," she says. "Part of it is a fantasy-reality thing and how it affects the whole persona of someone, watching these fabulous actresses completely change their look."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
When a series of books has sold almost 9 million copies in North America and two of those books have been made into movies, coming up with a new and equally successful idea can be tough. That's the situation in which Ann Brashares seems to have been in when she wrote the kickoff to her new series, "3 Willows: The Sisterhood Grows." As the subtitle indicates, the book is as much a continuation of her hugely successful "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants" books as it is a departure.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2009 | Reed Johnson
The daughters of Joni and Joan are alive and well and living these days in places like Buenos Aires and Portland, Ore. They also were on stage Tuesday night at the Troubadour, demonstrating to a transfixed crowd how they've absorbed the lessons of the aforementioned Mitchell, Baez and other elder stateswomen of the singer-songwriter sisterhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2008 | Jessica Reaves, Chicago Tribune
In the current popular culture, female friendships -- at any age -- are generally considered secondary to life's "important" relationships, the romantic bonds between men and women. Nowhere is this depressing trend more evident than in Hollywood, where story lines putatively about women's friendships tend toward the saccharine ("Mona Lisa Smile"), the malicious ("Mean Girls") or the boy-crazy (take your pick).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Another falsehood has emerged in the story of a privileged young white woman from Sherman Oaks whose memoir, "Love and Consequences," described her violent early years as a racially mixed foster child and drug-runner for the Bloods in South Central. Like those gangland tales, Margaret B. Jones' claim that she co-founded a Los Angeles foundation to help street kids appears to be fiction. The book has been recalled by Riverhead Books, its publisher. On the jacket of the book, Jones, whose real name is Margaret "Peggy" Seltzer, is described as "an active member" of Brother/SisterHood, "which works to reduce gang violence and mentor urban teens."
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