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Sisters In Crime Organization

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NEWS
January 21, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With both arms stretched out in the classic gun-holding stance, Garden Grove mystery writer Patricia McFall calmly aimed the Smith & Wesson revolver at the center of the target. "That's good," said weapons instructor Larry Morrison. "Hold it. Squeeze." After firing off several rounds, McFall admitted she didn't much care for shooting a handgun for the first time: "I'd rather the target look like a bush than a person."
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NEWS
January 21, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With both arms stretched out in the classic gun-holding stance, Garden Grove mystery writer Patricia McFall calmly aimed the Smith & Wesson revolver at the center of the target. "That's good," said weapons instructor Larry Morrison. "Hold it. Squeeze." After firing off several rounds, McFall admitted she didn't much care for shooting a handgun for the first time: "I'd rather the target look like a bush than a person."
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FOOD
June 21, 2000 | RUSS PARSONS
Sometimes I think there's just not enough silliness in cookbooks--intentional silliness, I mean. Of the other kind, there is certainly no shortage. Authors get so wrapped up in exploring the ins and outs and the hows and whys that they forget to have fun. That's definitely not the problem with "Desserticide II" (No Crime Unpublished, $12.99), a very informal paperback collection of recipes from the Southern California chapter of Sisters in Crime, an organization of female mystery writers.
NEWS
May 12, 1994 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gloria Steinem, whose lectures, essays and books--including "Revolution from Within" and "Outrageous Acts & Everyday Rebellions"--have shaped gender politics for three decades, will make a rare appearance in Ventura to lecture on the subject of her new book of essays, "Moving Beyond Words" published by Simon & Schuster. Steinem, always an innovative activist, founded Ms. Magazine in 1972. She co-founded New York Magazine, created the Ms.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Bouchercon, the annual ingathering of mystery readers and writers, was held here on Sherlock Holmes' turf, outside the United States for the first time in its 21-year history. Founded in Santa Monica in 1969, the event is named for the late critic and crime writer Anthony Boucher. Over the proceedings held in King's College on The Strand hung the ghostly but inspirational spirit of Dame Agatha Christie, whose centenary had been celebrated at Torquay, her home, a few days before Bouchercon began.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
They call themselves Sisters in Crime, but the dozen women gathered in a West Hollywood bookshop weren't up to anything more nefarious than promoting the interests of women mystery writers. The national Sisters in Crime organization was founded three years ago by Sara Paretsky, a successful Chicago-based writer of hard-boiled mysteries. Although women have written some of the greatest mysteries of all time, Paretsky and others believed women mystery writers were being given short shrift, particularly by reviewers for influential publications that have a major impact on sales.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN
The Orange County chapter of Sisters in Crime--an organization of mystery authors and readers--will host a fifth anniversary celebration and author appreciation program at 3 p.m. today in the community room at Pacifica Hospital, 18800 Delaware Ave., Huntington Beach. The public is invited.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Christine Louise Berry has been compiling information on murderesses from the Victorian Age to the present. She even has come up with a wry alphabetical catalog of the violent means that they used. A is for arsenic, of course. But there are a few surprises: Z, for example, is for 30 zinc coffins. "That's a true story," said Berry, who will recite her alphabet as part of "Women Who Kill Too Much," a performance piece tonight at the Huntington Beach Art Center; she is one of three collaborators.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | ALISON CARPER, NEWSDAY
The question hung in the air, hauntingly, tickling the morbid side of the imagination the way the wail of a police siren on a quiet night conjures up fanciful visions of crime. What weird twist of the psyche, the inquisitor wanted to know, would turn an ordinary woman into a pyromaniac?
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