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Sisters Of The Immaculate Heart Of Mary

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community. That act of conscience by most of the Hollywood-based Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary ended a standoff that had sent ripples of tension through congregations nationwide and to the Vatican.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
During a showdown with the Catholic Church in the late 1960s, Anita Caspary and the Los Angeles order she led, the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, were cast as "rebel nuns" for progressive reforms that included abandoning the nun's habit and suspending a fixed time for prayer. Although the moves were made in response to a call from the Vatican to modernize, conservative Cardinal James Francis McIntyre of the Los Angeles Archdiocese barred the sisters from teaching in the Catholic schools he oversaw.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community. That act of conscience by most of the Hollywood-based Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary ended a standoff that had sent ripples of tension through congregations nationwide and to the Vatican.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
During a showdown with the Catholic Church in the late 1960s, Anita Caspary and the Los Angeles order she led, the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, were cast as "rebel nuns" for progressive reforms that included abandoning the nun's habit and suspending a fixed time for prayer. Although the moves were made in response to a call from the Vatican to modernize, conservative Cardinal James Francis McIntyre of the Los Angeles Archdiocese barred the sisters from teaching in the Catholic schools he oversaw.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Five camera crewmen were injured, four of them seriously, when they were struck by a car during a stunt being filmed at a convent for the action-adventure television series "She Spies," authorities said. None of the five men were identified, said Bob Collis, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Fire Department. He said the crew was filming on the property of the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary on Waverly Drive when the car spun out of control.
NEWS
November 14, 1993
Regina McPartlin, 89, former Mother General of the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. She entered the order in 1923 and over the years taught at Immaculate Heart and Saint Anthony's high schools in Los Angeles and Long Beach respectively, and at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Midge Turk Richardson, a former nun and parochial school principal in Los Angeles who cast off her habit for the world of New York publishing, where she reigned for nearly two decades as editor of Seventeen magazine, has died. She was 82. Richardson, who was found in her New York City home Dec. 17, appeared to have died in her sleep from natural causes, according to her stepson, Kevin Richardson. A Los Angeles native, Richardson spent 18 years as a nun in the order of the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, including seven years as superintendent of Our Lady Queen of Angels High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Jesuit Father John D. McAnulty, who founded a retreat center in Los Angeles for Catholic priests and served as its director for more than 25 years, has died. He was 88. McAnulty died Saturday at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos, Calif., after a lengthy chronic illness, the California Jesuit provincial office announced. After McAnulty suggested starting a ministry dedicated to priests, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles opened the center in 1975.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1997 | Karla Perez-Villalta
HAUNTED HOUSE: The parish hall at St. Finbar Catholic Church will be transformed into a haunted house from 6 to 10 tonight and 6 to 9 p.m. Sunday at 2120 W. Olive Ave., Burbank. The event will benefit the parish school. Admission is $5 general, $3 for children. Information: (818) 848-0191. BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS: Churches from around Los Angeles will join to try to heal racial divisions and break down cultural barriers at a "reconciliation celebration" at 3 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They believed they were doing God's work. But earthly rules were getting in the way. So, rather than bow to the wishes of the conservative Roman Catholic Church hierarchy in Los Angeles, more than 300 nuns decided 23 years ago to leave their order to form a new type of religious community.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She first became known as Sister Mary Corita of the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. As head of the art department at the now-defunct Immaculate Heart College in Hollywood, she became widely known for her "op-pop" serigraphs and her association with the progressive order. Then, at age 50, after 32 years with the order, she left the sisterhood, re-entered the secular world as Corita Kent and continued with her artworks.
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