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NATIONAL
December 17, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Advocates for so-called plural marriages are applauding a ruling by a U.S. District Court judge that struck down key segments of Utah's anti-polygamy law, saying they violated constitutional rights to privacy and religious freedom. In a 91-page decision issued Friday, Judge Clark Waddoups effectively decriminalized polygamy in Utah, ruling that a central phrase in the state's law forbidding cohabitation with another person violated the 1st and 14th amendments. The ruling, which distinguishes between polygamy and bigamy, was the result of a lawsuit filed in 2011 by Kody Brown, star of the reality series "Sister Wives," now in its fourth season on cable TV's TLC. Brown has four "wives" - who together have 17 children - but is legally married only to his first, Meri Brown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Claudia Luther
Joan Fontaine, the coolly beautiful 1940s actress who won an Academy Award for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Suspicion" and who became almost as well-known for her lifelong feud with her famous older sister, Olivia de Havilland, died Sunday. She was 96. Fontaine died of natural causes at her home in Carmel, said her assistant, Susan Pfeiffer. In addition to winning an Academy Award as best actress for "Suspicion," Fontaine was also nominated as best actress for her role in Hitchcock's "Rebecca" (1940)
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Kari Howard
Although we had only two Column Ones in the paper this week, don't fret - when you add the Christopher Dorner manhunt series, we had six Great Reads. You might be saving up the series to read this weekend when you have more time, and this is your reminder not to let it languish like a stack of guilt-inducing New Yorkers. Yes, you know the outcome. But you haven't read anything like this. Metro reporters have done more than 400 interviews over the 10 months since the manhunt, a number that staggers me. But here's the wonderful alchemy of the series: the richness of details pulled from those interviews + some of our best writers = a beautiful, unexpected narrative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A Canyon Country man was charged Friday with murder in the deaths of his 68-year-old wife and 59-year-old sister, in what police have described as a possible "mercy killing. " Lance Anderson, 60, also faces special circumstance allegations of committing multiple murders and intentionally discharging a firearm with great bodily injury, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced. He was expected to be arraigned Friday in a San Fernando courtroom. If convicted of the charges, prosecutors said Anderson faces the death penalty or life in prison without parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Ruben Vives and Richard Winton
Two weeks ago, Lance Holger Anderson gave his Christmas tree to a neighbor, telling her “we're not having Christmas this year.” The neighbor thought nothing of it until Wednesday, when police cars swarmed the apartment complex. Police allege that Anderson killed his ailing wife at their Canyon Country apartment, then drove to a North Hills nursing facility, where he fatally shot his near-comatose sister. Anderson then dropped the gun and waited officers to arrive, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Richard Winton
A woman who authorities say was shot and killed by her brother Wednesday as she lay in a vegetative state in a North Hills convalescent home was identified as Lisa Nave, 58. Before the 60-year-old man killed his sister with a small-caliber handgun, he had killed his wife, who suffered from dementia, at their Canyon Country home, authorities said. Police described the fatal shooting of Lisa Nave as a "mercy killing. " “I use the term 'mercy killing' in terms of describing a killing here because I want people to understand that this man did not randomly walk into a hospital to commit this crime," said Lt. Paul Vernon of the Los Angeles Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Ruben Vives and Richard Winton
Two weeks ago, Lance Holger Anderson gave his Christmas tree to a neighbor, telling her "we're not having Christmas this year. " The neighbor thought nothing of it until Wednesday, when deputies swarmed the apartment complex. Authorities allege that Anderson killed his ailing wife at their Canyon Country apartment, then took a cab to a North Hills nursing facility, where he fatally shot his near-comatose sister. Anderson then dropped the gun and patiently waited for officers to arrive, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Richard Winton
A man who authorities said killed his ailing wife in their Canyon Country home and then fatally shot his near-comatose sister Wednesday at a North Hills nursing home had recently given away the family Christmas tree, saying he didn't need it this year. Lance Holger Anderson, 60, was arrested by the Los Angeles police on suspicion of killing his sister just hours after being taken into custody at the nursing home where he waited for detectives.  Neighbors in the quiet apartment couple said Anderson and his wife moved in five or six months ago. The man cared for his ailing wife.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Being the sister to the man who connected more than a billion people through Facebook can cause you to get overshadowed, and Randi Zuckerberg is getting a little tired of it.  Randi went on BBC's "Woman's Hour" radio program this week where she half joked that she is not just the sister to Mark Zuckerberg. "It must be awful, but do people always introduce you as Mark Zuckerberg's big sister?" "Woman's Hour" presenter Jane Garvey asked, to which Randi quickly replied "Yes. " PHOTOS: Top 10 ways to take advantage of the 'sharing economy' Randi then went on to explain that journalist Jeremy Paxman called her "Mark Zuckerberg's sister," but she mispronounced his name and called him "Jeremy Paxon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Some jobs - catching fastballs, singing pop songs, dancing en pointe - are a lot easier when you're young. Add to that list directing independent movies, where it's not the physical demands that wear out many filmmakers but the financial stresses. At some point, most indie directors tire of the never-ending hustle for the money to make and release their movies and repair to the more lucrative worlds of television and studio fare. That's what makes the career of John Sayles so remarkable.
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