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Sisyphus

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1998
As a retired teacher, I was saddened upon seeing a bumper sticker that read, "My kid can beat up your honor student." With that kind of parenting mentality (and politicking by school administrators), is it any wonder that the battles teachers wage daily in their classrooms make Sisyphus look like a couch potato. MICHAEL OLTON Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
Made up to look like black and white drawings, the protagonists in Mary Reid Kelley's videos speak in a constant, densely allusive patter. This approach worked swimmingly in her 2010 show at Susanne Vielmetter, which featured two videos that looked at the darker side of early modernism. The stark, stylized appearance of those works perfectly evoked stripped-down modern aesthetics. Her latest efforts - in collaboration with her partner, Patrick Kelley - are less taut and more expansive.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992
As the dredging of the Ventura Keys nears completion, we are again contemplating the "Myth of Sisyphus" syndrome. Citywide-generated drainage has once again started silting up the marina through the Arundell Barranca and city storm drains. The city, as is government's normal stance, refuses to look at permanent solutions but insists on temporary and more expensive ones. Condoning continuous pollution sources, especially in the age of ecological awareness, is one more example of irresponsible government.
HEALTH
September 20, 2010 | By Eric Jaffe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With unemployment idling near 10%, the negative effect of job loss on mental health has assumed a sharp relevance. Losing work has been linked to depressive symptoms, heavy alcohol use and even long-term psychological damage. But research suggests that loss of income explains only part of this pain. The rest has something to do with the deep connection people forge between themselves and their work. In several recent studies, social scientists have zeroed in on why paychecks alone can't explain the link between work and well-being.
HEALTH
September 20, 2010 | By Eric Jaffe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With unemployment idling near 10%, the negative effect of job loss on mental health has assumed a sharp relevance. Losing work has been linked to depressive symptoms, heavy alcohol use and even long-term psychological damage. But research suggests that loss of income explains only part of this pain. The rest has something to do with the deep connection people forge between themselves and their work. In several recent studies, social scientists have zeroed in on why paychecks alone can't explain the link between work and well-being.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Young males in contemporary novels seem to be perennially coming of age without ever arriving at it--as if adolescence were a burden they had to push along throughout their lives, like Sisyphus' rock. "Ripples" centers on the naive Brenton Heathersfield, who comes to Ocean City with his old prep school buddy, Christian, for one last summer of fun before entering college.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
Made up to look like black and white drawings, the protagonists in Mary Reid Kelley's videos speak in a constant, densely allusive patter. This approach worked swimmingly in her 2010 show at Susanne Vielmetter, which featured two videos that looked at the darker side of early modernism. The stark, stylized appearance of those works perfectly evoked stripped-down modern aesthetics. Her latest efforts - in collaboration with her partner, Patrick Kelley - are less taut and more expansive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2009 | Diana Wagman
What would you do if you knew the world was coming to an end? What if you were the only person who knew it, and you knew it irrefutably and without any hope of deliverance? Would you tell anyone? How would you live your life? Junior, the protagonist of Ron Currie Jr.'s superb novel "Everything Matters!," is 3 when he receives a prophecy from the television: The world will end in 36 years. Junior is already a special child.
OPINION
March 18, 1990 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe is a senior associate of the Center for Politics and Policy at the Claremont Graduate School
There is a phenomenon in political campaigning I call "the Sisyphus factor." Sisyphus, you may recall, was a character in Greek mythology condemned to roll a heavy stone up a hill, only to have it always roll down again. A campaign is like that--except, as the summit approaches, the impact of events and ideas can catapult the rock over the top. Or it can cause the stone to roll back down again--crushing the candidate. The Sisyphus factor is at work in the Democratic gubernatorial primary. (Sen.
SPORTS
November 8, 1986 | DAVE DISTEL
Tears erode the rocky shores of New England. Old Ironsides is draped in black. Kenmore Square is haunted. The lobster is not as sweet. This is what baseball can do. Baseball is hope and baseball is heartbreak. Except in Boston. Skip the hope. Thayer had Boston in mind when he invented Mudville. Red Sox fans should remember Casey when they work themselves into a frenzy. It would remind them that it always turns out the same way for them, just as it does for Casey.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2009 | Diana Wagman
What would you do if you knew the world was coming to an end? What if you were the only person who knew it, and you knew it irrefutably and without any hope of deliverance? Would you tell anyone? How would you live your life? Junior, the protagonist of Ron Currie Jr.'s superb novel "Everything Matters!," is 3 when he receives a prophecy from the television: The world will end in 36 years. Junior is already a special child.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
One morning a decade ago, on a day like most any other, Belgian-born artist Francis Alÿs had a large, knee-high block of ice delivered to the street outside his Mexico City studio. Shortly after 9 a.m., and dressed in a work shirt, chinos and red sneakers, the lanky artist bent over and began to push the heavy rectangular block along the pavement. For the next nine hours, cameraman Rafael Ortega recorded the quirky journey on video, which is now on view at the UCLA Hammer Museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1998
As a retired teacher, I was saddened upon seeing a bumper sticker that read, "My kid can beat up your honor student." With that kind of parenting mentality (and politicking by school administrators), is it any wonder that the battles teachers wage daily in their classrooms make Sisyphus look like a couch potato. MICHAEL OLTON Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992
As the dredging of the Ventura Keys nears completion, we are again contemplating the "Myth of Sisyphus" syndrome. Citywide-generated drainage has once again started silting up the marina through the Arundell Barranca and city storm drains. The city, as is government's normal stance, refuses to look at permanent solutions but insists on temporary and more expensive ones. Condoning continuous pollution sources, especially in the age of ecological awareness, is one more example of irresponsible government.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Young males in contemporary novels seem to be perennially coming of age without ever arriving at it--as if adolescence were a burden they had to push along throughout their lives, like Sisyphus' rock. "Ripples" centers on the naive Brenton Heathersfield, who comes to Ocean City with his old prep school buddy, Christian, for one last summer of fun before entering college.
OPINION
March 18, 1990 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe is a senior associate of the Center for Politics and Policy at the Claremont Graduate School
There is a phenomenon in political campaigning I call "the Sisyphus factor." Sisyphus, you may recall, was a character in Greek mythology condemned to roll a heavy stone up a hill, only to have it always roll down again. A campaign is like that--except, as the summit approaches, the impact of events and ideas can catapult the rock over the top. Or it can cause the stone to roll back down again--crushing the candidate. The Sisyphus factor is at work in the Democratic gubernatorial primary. (Sen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1989 | RAY LOYND T.H. McCULLOH
Madame Mao, facing another morning under permanent house arrest, rises from her prison cot and undertakes her daily regimen with a quiet fury that suggests she's quite capable of seizing power once again. How dare the People's Republic, her revolution, restrict her to sewing dolls, reading newspapers and watching television. "China is my medicine, and I will be cured!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
One morning a decade ago, on a day like most any other, Belgian-born artist Francis Alÿs had a large, knee-high block of ice delivered to the street outside his Mexico City studio. Shortly after 9 a.m., and dressed in a work shirt, chinos and red sneakers, the lanky artist bent over and began to push the heavy rectangular block along the pavement. For the next nine hours, cameraman Rafael Ortega recorded the quirky journey on video, which is now on view at the UCLA Hammer Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1989 | RAY LOYND T.H. McCULLOH
Madame Mao, facing another morning under permanent house arrest, rises from her prison cot and undertakes her daily regimen with a quiet fury that suggests she's quite capable of seizing power once again. How dare the People's Republic, her revolution, restrict her to sewing dolls, reading newspapers and watching television. "China is my medicine, and I will be cured!"
SPORTS
November 8, 1986 | DAVE DISTEL
Tears erode the rocky shores of New England. Old Ironsides is draped in black. Kenmore Square is haunted. The lobster is not as sweet. This is what baseball can do. Baseball is hope and baseball is heartbreak. Except in Boston. Skip the hope. Thayer had Boston in mind when he invented Mudville. Red Sox fans should remember Casey when they work themselves into a frenzy. It would remind them that it always turns out the same way for them, just as it does for Casey.
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