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OPINION
December 14, 2012
Re "He introduced Indian music to much of the Western world," Obituary, Dec. 12 I had the great fortune to see Ravi Shankar several times over the last 30 years. Unquestionably the most impressive of any musical performance I have ever seen was his benefit concert in Long Beach on Nov. 4. Despite requiring oxygen and assistance getting to and from the stage, he was in fine form throughout the show, demonstrating his characteristic sense of humor, masterful musicianship and love for the audience, fellow musicians and family.
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OPINION
December 14, 2012
Re "He introduced Indian music to much of the Western world," Obituary, Dec. 12 I had the great fortune to see Ravi Shankar several times over the last 30 years. Unquestionably the most impressive of any musical performance I have ever seen was his benefit concert in Long Beach on Nov. 4. Despite requiring oxygen and assistance getting to and from the stage, he was in fine form throughout the show, demonstrating his characteristic sense of humor, masterful musicianship and love for the audience, fellow musicians and family.
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OPINION
December 9, 2001 | RUBEN MARTINEZ
It was a warm fall evening in 1997, and on the patio of the Wilshire Ebell Theatre, mariachi trumpets were blasting. The occasion was a family reunion, and it was in all ways a typical Mexican fiesta--except for the presence of a handful of guests who stood out among the Old World elders and Mexican American kids. Huddled together at a table were George Harrison and some of his friends, including Indian sitar legend Ravi Shankar, Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne of Electric Light Orchestra and session drummer extraordinaire Jim Keltner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Mark Swed
On Sept. 28, 2011, Ravi Shankar was 91 and frail when he took the stage for an unforgettable night in Los Angeles. With Shankar's death at 92 on Tuesday, we share the review of that performance from Times music critic Mark Swed. I come to praise a legend. Ravi Shankar appeared at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Thursday night. Legendary and iconic are terms cheapened and debased by advertising and the overeager. They should be reserved for someone like Shankar. I am among the maybe millions whose first meaningful experience with music from a distant culture was Shankar's sitar playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Mark Swed
On Sept. 28, 2011, Ravi Shankar was 91 and frail when he took the stage for an unforgettable night in Los Angeles. With Shankar's death at 92 on Tuesday, we share the review of that performance from Times music critic Mark Swed. I come to praise a legend. Ravi Shankar appeared at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Thursday night. Legendary and iconic are terms cheapened and debased by advertising and the overeager. They should be reserved for someone like Shankar. I am among the maybe millions whose first meaningful experience with music from a distant culture was Shankar's sitar playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Jan Garbarek was best known as a member of Keith Jarrett's early '70s European quartet but the Norwegian saxophonist has been a fixture at the ECM label since that time. ECM had a reputation for an ethereal, "pastel" label sound so it's not surprising that Garbarek sounded like the godfather of Nordic new age music in his local debut at the L.A. Theatre Center on Thursday. His high-tech quartet played music of the mind that largely abandoned rhythmic pulse to stress textural improvisation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"If East has to meet West," a music critic wrote of the 1971 premiere of Ravi Shankar's First Sitar Concerto in London, "then few musicians have achieved it with such open joy as Ravi Shankar." Dated, provincial words, perhaps. If music, if culture, if life have taught us anything in the past few decades, it is that East most definitely must, and does, meet West. Indeed, open, joyous multicultural encounters have been the tradition in California music for close to a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
Ustad Vilayat Khan, one of India's leading sitar players, died Saturday at Bombay's Jaslok Hospital. He was 76. Khan had lung cancer, diabetes and hypertension, the Press Trust of India reported. He was born in Gouripur, a village that is now part of Bangladesh, into a family of musicians that traced its lineage six or seven generations back to the Moghul courts and ultimately to Miyan Tansen, the court musician of the Emperor Akbar of the late 16th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Originally a recording concept, the "Meeting of Angels" mix of Gregorian chant and North Indian sitar music has been transposed into an unlikely but viable touring concert. Sitarist Ustad Nishat Khan and the Gregorian Voices quartet arrived Friday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on their first trip through the U.S. As with similar New Age conceits, such as the Jan Garbarek/Hilliard Ensemble "Officium," a certain suspension of cynical and purist impulses is required here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2010 | By Nomi Morris
An eclectic group of people sat on floor cushions in a Los Feliz home earlier this month for a concert to mark famed sitar player Ravi Shankar's 90th birthday. In the same room where Shankar played in the 1960s sat atheists and believers, guests who were raised Catholic, Jewish, Muslim and evangelical Christian. They came together at the home of Shankar's longtime friend Jan Steward to hear Paul Livingstone, a Los Angeles-based virtuoso sitar player who, in the last year, has adapted various world music styles to church worship.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Jason Kehe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - When Gavin Martin and his family moved here from southern India in the early '70s, the country's capital city offered the gifted young pianist exactly one option for continuing his music education: the Delhi School of Music. It was the only place in town - perhaps in the whole of northern India - that taught Western classical music with any degree of competence. Even so, life wasn't easy for the serious student born in a country where the sitar is king. "Growing up in India playing the piano was kind of like [being]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2010 | By Nomi Morris
An eclectic group of people sat on floor cushions in a Los Feliz home earlier this month for a concert to mark famed sitar player Ravi Shankar's 90th birthday. In the same room where Shankar played in the 1960s sat atheists and believers, guests who were raised Catholic, Jewish, Muslim and evangelical Christian. They came together at the home of Shankar's longtime friend Jan Steward to hear Paul Livingstone, a Los Angeles-based virtuoso sitar player who, in the last year, has adapted various world music styles to church worship.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
THERE is a feline grace about Anoushka Shankar as she sits cross-legged onstage, as she did earlier this year at the San Francisco Opera House, her dark hair flowing gently across the golden threads of her sari. Her long, many-stringed sitar -- ungainly for some players, surprisingly elegant in her small hands -- is propped on one knee as she moves and sways with the music, making almost constant eye contact with the veteran sitarist seated next to her: Ravi Shankar, her father.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
Ustad Vilayat Khan, one of India's leading sitar players, died Saturday at Bombay's Jaslok Hospital. He was 76. Khan had lung cancer, diabetes and hypertension, the Press Trust of India reported. He was born in Gouripur, a village that is now part of Bangladesh, into a family of musicians that traced its lineage six or seven generations back to the Moghul courts and ultimately to Miyan Tansen, the court musician of the Emperor Akbar of the late 16th century.
OPINION
December 9, 2001 | RUBEN MARTINEZ
It was a warm fall evening in 1997, and on the patio of the Wilshire Ebell Theatre, mariachi trumpets were blasting. The occasion was a family reunion, and it was in all ways a typical Mexican fiesta--except for the presence of a handful of guests who stood out among the Old World elders and Mexican American kids. Huddled together at a table were George Harrison and some of his friends, including Indian sitar legend Ravi Shankar, Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne of Electric Light Orchestra and session drummer extraordinaire Jim Keltner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"If East has to meet West," a music critic wrote of the 1971 premiere of Ravi Shankar's First Sitar Concerto in London, "then few musicians have achieved it with such open joy as Ravi Shankar." Dated, provincial words, perhaps. If music, if culture, if life have taught us anything in the past few decades, it is that East most definitely must, and does, meet West. Indeed, open, joyous multicultural encounters have been the tradition in California music for close to a century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Jason Kehe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - When Gavin Martin and his family moved here from southern India in the early '70s, the country's capital city offered the gifted young pianist exactly one option for continuing his music education: the Delhi School of Music. It was the only place in town - perhaps in the whole of northern India - that taught Western classical music with any degree of competence. Even so, life wasn't easy for the serious student born in a country where the sitar is king. "Growing up in India playing the piano was kind of like [being]
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times Staff Writer
Shubho Shankar was the last of the three musicians to walk onto the wooden stage and sit cross-legged on the floor. He picked up his sitar, tightened a string or two and flashed a thousand-watt smile that lit up the dark auditorium. Shyam Kane tapped on the tabla drums, and Rajeev Taranath strummed the sarod.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Originally a recording concept, the "Meeting of Angels" mix of Gregorian chant and North Indian sitar music has been transposed into an unlikely but viable touring concert. Sitarist Ustad Nishat Khan and the Gregorian Voices quartet arrived Friday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on their first trip through the U.S. As with similar New Age conceits, such as the Jan Garbarek/Hilliard Ensemble "Officium," a certain suspension of cynical and purist impulses is required here.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1998 | John Henken, John Henken is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Though you could talk forever about the myriad melodic forms and rhythmic cycles of Indian classical music, at its heart lies not the mechanics of ragas and talas, nor even the aesthetics of rasas, the specific moods or emotions the music expresses. Rather, at the core of this ancient tradition is a personal and artistic relationship--that of master and student. A particularly rare and vibrant example of that relationship is flourishing in this almost stereotypical Southern California community.
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