Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSitiveni Rabuka
IN THE NEWS

Sitiveni Rabuka

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 30, 1987
Fiji's army commander, Col. Sitiveni Rabuka, declared Fiji a republic and appointed himself head of state. In a national radio address, he said the South Pacific island nation is severing constitutional ties with Britain. Rabuka, who led a coup May 14 and again last week, said he will appoint an interim council of ministers to rule until a new constitution is drawn up to guarantee political dominance by ethnic Fijians over a slightly larger Indian population.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 11, 1987
Fiji marked the 17th anniversary of its independence from Britain as the South Pacific island nation ended a second week under the control of military strongman Col. Sitiveni Rabuka. India, meanwhile, saying it does not recognize the republic proclaimed by Rabuka, suspended trade and technical cooperation with Fiji. Australia already has suspended aid, and New Zealand says it may suspend its support. Rabuka staged two coups in five months, the latest on Sept.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1987
Having lived in the interior of Fiji from 1984-86, I share a sympathy and concern for their situation. I lived in a village, sleeping, eating, and talking as they did. Thus, I believe I understand some of what they are experiencing. Further, I am compelled to support and applaud the efforts of Lt. Col. Sitiveni Rabuka. He rallied for the traditional Fijian--the Fijian who has seen his tropical paradise change at a furious rate within the last hundred years; the Fijian who lives off the land in the bush; the Fijian who has seen ethnic Indians rise in number and economic power at their expense.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | Associated Press
Coup leader Sitiveni Rabuka said Monday he has abolished Fiji's constitution and that a new one will be drawn up to make sure that ethnic Fijians hold the political power in this South Pacific island nation. Col. Rabuka told a group of foreign diplomats that he will appoint a council of ministers to run the country in the meantime. Britain has warned that Rabuka's actions could end Fiji's membership in the Commonwealth. Rabuka seized power Friday for the second time.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | Associated Press
Coup leader Sitiveni Rabuka said Monday he has abolished Fiji's constitution and that a new one will be drawn up to make sure that ethnic Fijians hold the political power in this South Pacific island nation. Col. Rabuka told a group of foreign diplomats that he will appoint a council of ministers to run the country in the meantime. Britain has warned that Rabuka's actions could end Fiji's membership in the Commonwealth. Rabuka seized power Friday for the second time.
NEWS
September 26, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Col. Sitiveni Rabuka, a native Fijian and head of the armed forces, said Friday he staged his second military coup in this South Pacific island nation to block a political comeback by the elected Indian majority he toppled in the first coup May 14. In a radio announcement, Rabuka said he had seized power again because the new government did not meet the goal that motivated his first coup: ensuring that Melanesians would control Fiji's government.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Supporters of ousted Fijian Prime Minister Timoci Bavadra threatened Saturday to set up a breakaway government in this South Pacific island nation to rival a 19-member council of advisers that will run the government until new elections are held in several months, according to Bavadra aides. Bavadra had been offered a seat on the advisory council, agreed to Friday by Governor General Penaia Ganilau and the Great Council of Chiefs, the traditional leaders of ethnic Fijians.
NEWS
September 26, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Col. Sitiveni Rabuka, a native Fijian and head of the armed forces, said Friday he staged his second military coup in this South Pacific island nation to block a political comeback by the elected Indian majority he toppled in the first coup May 14. In a radio announcement, Rabuka said he had seized power again because the new government did not meet the goal that motivated his first coup: ensuring that Melanesians would control Fiji's government.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
Here in the heart of the South Pacific, on an island of gentle breezes and eternal innocence, a noble experiment in democracy and multiracial harmony has met its severest challenge--and has failed. For 17 years, ever since gaining its independence from Britain, this nation of 322 islands and 715,000 people was, as Pope John Paul II put it last November, "a symbol of hope in the world."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1987
Having lived in the interior of Fiji from 1984-86, I share a sympathy and concern for their situation. I lived in a village, sleeping, eating, and talking as they did. Thus, I believe I understand some of what they are experiencing. Further, I am compelled to support and applaud the efforts of Lt. Col. Sitiveni Rabuka. He rallied for the traditional Fijian--the Fijian who has seen his tropical paradise change at a furious rate within the last hundred years; the Fijian who lives off the land in the bush; the Fijian who has seen ethnic Indians rise in number and economic power at their expense.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|