Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSix Day War
IN THE NEWS

Six Day War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exploiting mobility and massive use of air power and armor, the allied invasion of Kuwait resembles the German blitzkrieg that rolled over Poland and smashed Belgium, Holland and France in the early days of World War II. As was the case in the Germans' "lightning war," the speed and shock of the allied attack are intended not only to destroy the enemy's defenses but also to wear down his morale and will to resist, spurring wholesale surrenders of Iraqi soldiers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 9, 2012
Miko Peled's Op-Ed article on Wednesday about Israel's 1967 war prompted reader Desmond Tuck of San Mateo, Calif., to write: "I share Miko Peled's dream of peace in the Middle East. But his article brought the expression 'Monday morning quarterback' to mind. When Hitler was poised to enter the Sudetenland and no one stopped him, we all know what happened next. "It is naive to argue 45 years after the fact that Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser was not able to launch a full-scale war against Israel in 1967.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Soon after the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, East Jerusalem's Palestinian residents wanted to erect a monument to the Jordanian soldiers who had died in the battle for the city, and Meron Benvenisti thought he saw an opportunity. Benvenisti, the new Israeli administrator over Jerusalem's eastern sector, knew that there was formidable opposition to the idea among the Jews of the recently unified city.
WORLD
July 20, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Batsheva Sobelman
Calling Israel's sovereignty over Jerusalem indisputable, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday rejected U.S. demands to stop plans to build 20 Jewish-owned apartments in the eastern part of the city that Palestinians regard as key to their future state.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1986 | From Associated Press
An Israeli made-for-television movie about the Six-Day War has won first prize at the Locarno International Film Festival. It was the first Israeli film to win the 39-year-old competition. Second prize was awarded to West German Peter Schulze Rohr for "Hautnah" ("At Close Range"), which deals with industrial espionage. An American, Joseph Sargent, won third prize for "Love Is Never Silent," the story of a boy raised by deaf parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1990
In the kettles of hostility that brew propaganda, lessons of history are less likely to be used than abused. This is the case with a bogus view of the past that was floated by Saddam Hussein after his invasion of Kuwait. The non-Arab world, he charged, quotes United Nations resolutions from both sides of its mouth. The counterfeit was most recently seen being put into circulation during the post-summit press conference held by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S.
OPINION
June 3, 2007 | Michael Oren, MICHAEL OREN, a senior fellow at the Adelson Institute for Strategic Studies at the Shalem Center, is the author of "Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East," which won the Los Angeles Times Book Award.
BY ALL contemporary accounts, it was one of the most stunning military victories in history. In six intense days of fighting that began on June 5, 1967, Israeli forces saved their country from an imminent existential threat, defeated three major Arab armies and almost quadrupled the territory under their country's control. Israeli flags flew on the banks of the Suez Canal, over the Golan Heights and above the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, the holiest site in Judaism.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The turning point of the 1967 Six-Day War, Yishiyahu Leibowitz says, was the seventh day. "On that day we had to decide whether that war was a war of defense or a war of conquest," the 84-year-old science professor said recently. "And we decided post facto that it was a war of conquest." To Leibowitz, the 20 years since have been characterized by "a long process of decline, internally and externally," exposing what was once seen as Israel's "brilliant victory" as "a historical disaster."
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Twenty years after the Six-Day War, Americans tend to think that Israel should give back at least some of the Arab territory it captured and that there should be peace negotiations with the Palestine Liberation Organization, a survey by the Los Angeles Times Poll showed. However, public support for the idea of negotiating with the PLO actually has declined substantially in recent years, since the optimistic afterglow of the 1978 Camp David peace accords between Israel and Egypt.
NEWS
June 1, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Among the books on display at the headquarters of a human rights organization here is one detailing the hodgepodge of Israeli, British, Jordanian and even Turkish laws applied by Israeli occupation authorities.
OPINION
June 7, 2007
Re "A holy city still divided," "Change cast in concrete" and "Clashing values alter a city's face," three-part series, June 3-5 In the first installment of this series, The Times details the history and circumstances of Jerusalem since the 1967 Six-Day War, quoting a former Israeli paratrooper as saying that "he now believes Israel should yield on Jerusalem in the interests of peace." What he and The Times failed to state is that now there can and should be no negotiations concerning Jerusalem until the Islamists no longer desire to drive the Jews in Israel into the sea. The article ignores this aspect of the situation, as if Islamist leaders have not been continuously making such statements.
OPINION
June 5, 2007 | Meir Shalev, MEIR SHALEV is the author of "A Pigeon and a Boy," to be published in the U.S. in October, and a columnist for the Israeli daily Yediot Aharonot. This was translated from Hebrew by Evan Fallenberg.
I WAS BORN during the 1948 war, which we Israelis refer to as the War of Independence. At the time, we were fighting against the Palestinians and the Arab nations, who refused to accept the U.N. Partition Plan that would have divided Palestine into two states for two peoples. My mother conceived me in Jerusalem, which was, at the time, under siege. The city was being bombarded, and there was no water, no food, no medicine.
OPINION
June 3, 2007 | Michael Oren, MICHAEL OREN, a senior fellow at the Adelson Institute for Strategic Studies at the Shalem Center, is the author of "Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East," which won the Los Angeles Times Book Award.
BY ALL contemporary accounts, it was one of the most stunning military victories in history. In six intense days of fighting that began on June 5, 1967, Israeli forces saved their country from an imminent existential threat, defeated three major Arab armies and almost quadrupled the territory under their country's control. Israeli flags flew on the banks of the Suez Canal, over the Golan Heights and above the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, the holiest site in Judaism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Mordechai Hod, the commander of the Israeli air force during its lightning 1967 destruction of Egyptian, Jordanian and Syrian warplanes, died Sunday in Tel Aviv. He was 76. Hod, a British army veteran who joined the Israeli air force in 1949, died in Tel Hashomer Hospital after a "lengthy illness," Israeli media reported. A major general, he directed repeated sorties over Arab airfields June 5, 1967, preemptive strikes that destroyed most of the Arabs' planes and ensured a quick Israeli victory.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Rodny was a 20-year-old Israeli army lieutenant riding in an armored vehicle toward Jericho when he heard the news over his military radio: East Jerusalem was in Israeli hands. "We were crying, weeping," recalled Rodny, whose battalion fought in Jerusalem and Jericho. "It was like half our heart, so long from our body, had come back to us."
OPINION
April 25, 1993 | JACOB NEUSNER, Jacob Neusner is Distinguished Research Professor of Religious Studies at the University of South Florida, Tampa. His latest book is "A Rabbi Talks With Jesus" (Doubleday, 1993).
Monday in Washington, the United States Holocaust Memorial opens its doors on the Mall in the nation's memorial corridor, a powerful symbolic statement that America mourns the mass murder of millions of Jews in World War II Europe. American Jewry's obsession with remembering the catastrophe, to the near-exclusion of all else, comes to triumphant conclusion.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Rodny was a 20-year-old Israeli army lieutenant riding in an armored vehicle toward Jericho when he heard the news over his military radio: East Jerusalem was in Israeli hands. "We were crying, weeping," recalled Rodny, whose battalion fought in Jerusalem and Jericho. "It was like half our heart, so long from our body, had come back to us."
MAGAZINE
October 13, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Daniel Williams is The Times' Jerusalem bureau chief.
AT ANOTHER TIME IN ANOTHER PLACE, BATYA KFIR MIGHT BE TAKEN FOR AN AMERIcan pioneer woman fearlessly taking civilization into a strange land and holding off the local natives. The bonnet-like covering on her head and the long dress somehow complete the image--she could be auditioning for a role in "Wagon Train." At night, she sits outdoors with a couple of friends, surrounded by her brood of children, and wonders aloud about their future on the frontier.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel celebrated its quarter-century hold on Jerusalem this week, but along with the fireworks and pomp, acrimonious debate broke out over just whose city it is. Obvious points of dispute were voiced by Israelis and Palestinians, the Arabs contending that, despite Israel's assertion of sovereignty, the Israeli capital is divided and the eastern half rightfully belongs to them. "Israelis are celebrating under the slogan of a unified Jerusalem.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Daniel Williams is The Times' Jerusalem bureau chief.
AT ANOTHER TIME IN ANOTHER PLACE, BATYA KFIR MIGHT BE TAKEN FOR AN AMERIcan pioneer woman fearlessly taking civilization into a strange land and holding off the local natives. The bonnet-like covering on her head and the long dress somehow complete the image--she could be auditioning for a role in "Wagon Train." At night, she sits outdoors with a couple of friends, surrounded by her brood of children, and wonders aloud about their future on the frontier.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|