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Six Feet Under Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2001 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memo to HBO: Sometimes it isn't necessary to reinvent the wheel. Spinning it a little will do. "Six Feet Under," which will conclude its freshman season with back-to-back episodes Sunday, is beginning to attract the sort of loyal audience and critical acclaim that made "Sex and the City" and "The Sopranos" smash hits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2006 | Matea Gold
Missing the macabre Fishers? Later this year, you can relive the funeral home family's travails when Bravo begins airing repeats of "Six Feet Under," the critically acclaimed Alan Ball drama that ended its run on HBO last year. It's the latest HBO show to be picked up for syndication since "Sex and the City" found a home on TBS. -- Matea Gold
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
HBO faces a terrible dilemma of its own making. ABC, CBS and NBC don't face it. Fox doesn't face it. UPN and the WB network don't face it. PBS doesn't face it. Nor Showtime or anyone else along TV's wide-flung sprawl of cable. The predicament, the crucible for HBO? How to top or even match its own scintillating achievement. The price of being good--way, way above the rest--is high, often unreasonable expectations from viewers. In other words, forget about last week, last month or last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2005 | Scott Collins
HBO's "Six Feet Under" showed a little more of a ratings pulse with its much-talked-about series finale Sunday night. The 72-minute farewell to the Fisher mortuary clan dug up an average of 3.9 million viewers, according to figures released Tuesday by Nielsen Media Research. The numbers gave a bittersweet sendoff to one of HBO's signature shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003
I was looking for a laugh and got one when I found Fox's "24" Tuesday night and watched fearless Jack Bauer take off on a suicide mission to save America by crashing a terrorist nuclear bomb and himself into the desert. Jack was supposed to be alone, but talk about predictable.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2005 | Scott Collins
HBO's "Six Feet Under" showed a little more of a ratings pulse with its much-talked-about series finale Sunday night. The 72-minute farewell to the Fisher mortuary clan dug up an average of 3.9 million viewers, according to figures released Tuesday by Nielsen Media Research. The numbers gave a bittersweet sendoff to one of HBO's signature shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2006 | Matea Gold
Missing the macabre Fishers? Later this year, you can relive the funeral home family's travails when Bravo begins airing repeats of "Six Feet Under," the critically acclaimed Alan Ball drama that ended its run on HBO last year. It's the latest HBO show to be picked up for syndication since "Sex and the City" found a home on TBS. -- Matea Gold
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003
I was looking for a laugh and got one when I found Fox's "24" Tuesday night and watched fearless Jack Bauer take off on a suicide mission to save America by crashing a terrorist nuclear bomb and himself into the desert. Jack was supposed to be alone, but talk about predictable.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2001 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memo to HBO: Sometimes it isn't necessary to reinvent the wheel. Spinning it a little will do. "Six Feet Under," which will conclude its freshman season with back-to-back episodes Sunday, is beginning to attract the sort of loyal audience and critical acclaim that made "Sex and the City" and "The Sopranos" smash hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
HBO faces a terrible dilemma of its own making. ABC, CBS and NBC don't face it. Fox doesn't face it. UPN and the WB network don't face it. PBS doesn't face it. Nor Showtime or anyone else along TV's wide-flung sprawl of cable. The predicament, the crucible for HBO? How to top or even match its own scintillating achievement. The price of being good--way, way above the rest--is high, often unreasonable expectations from viewers. In other words, forget about last week, last month or last season.
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